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tinbucket

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    tinbucket got a reaction from claclana in Ceramic Tape Recipe? (Like Keraflex)   
    http://www.alfredgrindingroom.com/raw-materials/
    http://www.alfredgrindingroom.com/recipes/
    ^ A wealth of information on ceramic materials and experiments. The tape casting pdf is on the first link, the same one posted by two others in this thread
  2. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from D.M.Ernst in Plaster Vs. Bisque Bats And Molds   
    Others have said this but to reiterate - use Pottery Plaster #1 not Plaster of Paris
  3. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from BlackDogPottery in tools or methods drawing fine lines of underglaze   
    This may be helpful: 
     
     

  4. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from maidmarion in Terracotta & glaze compatability   
    My first guess is what Marcia said. Bisque to a higher temperature than you glaze fire to. Red clay has lots of impurities/organic matter which leads to a high loss on ignition and off-gassing (matter burns out of the clay and produces gas, the gas is trapped by the glaze).
  5. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from glazenerd in Terracotta & glaze compatability   
    My first guess is what Marcia said. Bisque to a higher temperature than you glaze fire to. Red clay has lots of impurities/organic matter which leads to a high loss on ignition and off-gassing (matter burns out of the clay and produces gas, the gas is trapped by the glaze).
  6. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Rae Reich in Making terra cotta bricks   
    Yes. You might look at some old brick making techniques to give you some ideas. My brother makes wooden molds for custom shapes of bricks, fills them with clay, then wires the excess clay from the top of the mold. The clay he uses is Redart for the color, sand as an aggregate/adds a coarse texture, and some ball clay for plasticity. I fire them to cone 04 and he uses them like regular bricks. The bricks when installed act like a crown molding/baseboard trim. It’s inefficient but it makes his home unique. Adding some type of coarse material will improve the drying properties of clay. Also, I’m not sure why you would add further detail after the clay is fired, it is easier to work with when plastic and holds detail very well.
  7. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Rae Reich in tools or methods drawing fine lines of underglaze   
    This may be helpful: 
     
     

  8. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from yappystudent in tools or methods drawing fine lines of underglaze   
    This may be helpful: 
     
     

  9. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Sheryl Leigh in Please tell me I'm not crazy...   
    Unless you have a pugmill, lots of buckets, and free time I doubt it will be financially sensible to go through with it. It can be a lot of work to reclaim clay if you don't have a good set up. To contradict myself I would probably do it depending on the circumstances. I've never heard of the clay but that doesn't mean much. You could take a small chunk of the clay, place it in a bowl made of high fire clay and fire it to cone 6 and 10, if possible. The absorption of the fired clay/just looking at it will give you an idea of what you have. Because she's insisting it's low fire it may be a talc/ball clay body but it's hard to say. Best luck to ya
  10. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Celadon - Application?   
    Adding water + epsom salt or epsom salt alone should help you get a more even application and less drips
  11. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Min in Celadon - Application?   
    Adding water + epsom salt or epsom salt alone should help you get a more even application and less drips
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