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tinbucket

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  1. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from D.M.Ernst in Plaster Vs. Bisque Bats And Molds   
    Others have said this but to reiterate - use Pottery Plaster #1 not Plaster of Paris
  2. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from BlackDogPottery in tools or methods drawing fine lines of underglaze   
    This may be helpful: 
     
     

  3. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from maidmarion in Terracotta & glaze compatability   
    My first guess is what Marcia said. Bisque to a higher temperature than you glaze fire to. Red clay has lots of impurities/organic matter which leads to a high loss on ignition and off-gassing (matter burns out of the clay and produces gas, the gas is trapped by the glaze).
  4. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from glazenerd in Terracotta & glaze compatability   
    My first guess is what Marcia said. Bisque to a higher temperature than you glaze fire to. Red clay has lots of impurities/organic matter which leads to a high loss on ignition and off-gassing (matter burns out of the clay and produces gas, the gas is trapped by the glaze).
  5. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Rae Reich in Making terra cotta bricks   
    Yes. You might look at some old brick making techniques to give you some ideas. My brother makes wooden molds for custom shapes of bricks, fills them with clay, then wires the excess clay from the top of the mold. The clay he uses is Redart for the color, sand as an aggregate/adds a coarse texture, and some ball clay for plasticity. I fire them to cone 04 and he uses them like regular bricks. The bricks when installed act like a crown molding/baseboard trim. It’s inefficient but it makes his home unique. Adding some type of coarse material will improve the drying properties of clay. Also, I’m not sure why you would add further detail after the clay is fired, it is easier to work with when plastic and holds detail very well.
  6. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Rae Reich in tools or methods drawing fine lines of underglaze   
    This may be helpful: 
     
     

  7. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from yappystudent in tools or methods drawing fine lines of underglaze   
    This may be helpful: 
     
     

  8. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Sheryl Leigh in Please tell me I'm not crazy...   
    Unless you have a pugmill, lots of buckets, and free time I doubt it will be financially sensible to go through with it. It can be a lot of work to reclaim clay if you don't have a good set up. To contradict myself I would probably do it depending on the circumstances. I've never heard of the clay but that doesn't mean much. You could take a small chunk of the clay, place it in a bowl made of high fire clay and fire it to cone 6 and 10, if possible. The absorption of the fired clay/just looking at it will give you an idea of what you have. Because she's insisting it's low fire it may be a talc/ball clay body but it's hard to say. Best luck to ya
  9. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from bobtiki in How Would I Make This… Stamp? Medallion?   
    The graphic/impression was most likely made with a wooden or metal stamp. It may be a sprig like Pres said or it ma have been stamped directly into the surface of the pot. I think it would be less work (after some trial and error) to stamp the pot directly. There are a number of companies that will make a stamp from a graphic. A quick online search will give you a number of companies and their pricing. You can also try an office supply store. If they offer customized rubber stamps, I assume that would work too. If I was trying to replicate the photo I would throw the pot, stamp it, apply underglaze or stain wash to the logo, wipe away the high areas of underglaze with a sponge, bisque it, wax the stamped area, then dip the entire pot in glaze.
  10. Like
    tinbucket reacted to Tyler Miller in How I Process My Wild Clay   
    There has been some interest in how to use your own dug clays, so I thought I'd share what I've been up to and maybe help a few people on their own journey to using materials claimed themselves.  Today I was processing some clay I harvested this week and last year, and I thought i'd share what I do.

     

    To begin your search, I would advise you track down a publication from your State, provincial, or regional geological office.  In my case, this is "The Clay and Shale resources of Ontario"  (link here: OFR5134 - Clay and shale resources of Ontario - Geology ...  ) an excellent publication that analyzes the composition of clay and shale from around the province, fires them, and characterizes other features, such as the geology of the areas where they found the clay etc.  Your area likely has something similar.

     

    When you've located a promising sample, before anything else, determine if it's worth your while even to consider it.  Test its plasticity. (All links from this point on are to my gallery)  Edit:  To actually perform this test, wedge the clay in your hands out of the ground with some water to a good working consistency.  Roll into a snake, and bend over itself and twist.

     

    http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/4146-img-0472/

     

    If you can't get your clay to do that, move on.  It might be a good glaze, you might have a good additive for a clay body, but you're not going to be able to use it out of the ground.

     

    If your plasticity test is good, awesome, dig up a bucket full.  In my case, I know this clay is good, so I picked up several hundred pounds of the stuff.    Here's a small sample.

     

    http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/4147-img-0473/

     

    Next, cover it water. Cover it, and let it fester in a warm place for as long as you can stand.  For this particular batch, I'm going to leave it for two weeks.  It's what I can afford to leave it for.

     

    http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/4149-img-0475/

     

    For the batch below, I left it to sit for a year.  The longer the better, I've found.  I don't have a real explanation but, I think it has to do with a change in chemistry.  Throws better.  The water is cloudy because I stirred it up to feel how it was working.

     

    http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/4148-img-0474/

     

    Next, take a quantity and REALLY stir it, until it's like a milk shake.  Mix it as thoroughly as possible.  You'll notice that there's clumps of fibre, rocks, and other stuff in the mix.  The goal is to wash this debris of the clay its holding onto and get as much of the clay into solution as possible.

     

    http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/4150-img-0476/

     

    Secure a window screen over a second bucket.  In my case, the trimming scrap bucket for the same clay.  You may find you need a finer mesh screen to get your clay to work for you.  Experiment.  Window screening works for me because there's literally nothing in my clay but roots and moss.  You'll find that as you pour, the screen will get clogged with debris.  Scrub this debris against the screen, squeeze it in your hands (the clay will escape, the most of the debris will stay in your hand), and return it to your first bucket. 

     

    http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/4152-img-0478/

     

     

    Give the bucket a thorough stirring to "wash" the clay off the debris.  At the end, you'll be left with a little cow pat of a bit of clay, debris, and maybe stones.

     

    http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/4153-img-0480/

     

     

    Once filtered through a window screen, it will pass through a 40 mesh sieve without any debris on the screen.  You may find you have a different situation.  However, you may want some debris in your clay--it adds character.  John Baymore has discussed this and the results can be pleasing.

     

    After you've filtered your clay, let it settle out, siphon off the excess water and dry, pug, wedge, and otherwise process as you would reclaim.

     

    It's now time to test it.  Form it into bars, measure the bars when wet, then dry, and fire them at different temperatures, if they survive drying.  How does it look at cone 04, 1, 5, and 10?  Did it spall because of lime?  Find a new source if so, but remember that some pottery styles (esp. in Mexico) embrace lime pops.

     

    My particular clay melts at cone 4 and slumps at around cone 1.5.  Measure your bars after firing to each cone.  I've got a pretty heavy shrink from wet to dry and dry to mature.  This is something I've got to work toward fixing.

     

    Another thing to remember is to break the bars to check for carbon coring.  This is a real pain with wild clays as there is usually MUCH more organic matter than what you'd buy ready processed.  If you've got a dark interior to your clay, adjust your firing schedule to include a good long soak (sometimes over an hour) in oxidation from when the pots begin to get colour up to about cone 04.  

     

    If you decide your clay needs grog, a cost effective way of making it is to allow a portion of your clay to dry, pulverize, screen to a desirable size, and fire in a bowl to bisque temps.  I have not found that crushing failed bisqueware is a cost effective way of making grog without a ball mill.

     

    I hope you guys found this useful.  I thought I'd share what I do.  Here's a pot I threw a few weeks ago with clay processed this way.  I'm drying it as slowly as possible.  I'll be firing it either this week coming or next.  Not sure it will survive, as i'm still debating if I need grog or not, but it threw nicely all the same.

     

    http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/4154-img-0444/

  11. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from gejoreni in Looking For A Mentor   
    I would take a class at a local community college or art center and see if any of the instructors resonate with you/have the knowledge you seek. See if they tutor on the side or would be willing to barter your time assisting them for their time teaching. I would look for anyone experienced in the field close to you and tell them what you are looking for. Even if they are not the person to teach you they might put you in touch with someone who will. I'm a big believer in seek and you will find, something like that. If you go out there and talk to potters or art teachers in your area, you will find what you are looking for.
  12. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Reduce Drip Marks   
    Epsom salts and most likely water, you will be flocculating. John Britt has a few great videos on the topic on YouTube
  13. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from sine in Looking For A Reliable Emmanuel Cooper Transparent Earthenware Glaze 1050'c Recipe   
    I use 90 Ferro Frit 3124, 10 EPK, and 2 bentonite, fired to cone 03. Cone 04 will work too, you may be able to go even lower. If it crazes, substitute some Frit 3249 for the 3124. Be sure to test because the chemestry of the frit may not be compatible with some of the underglazes. Other than that this is a super easy and reliable lowfire clear.
  14. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Sputty in Looking For A Reliable Emmanuel Cooper Transparent Earthenware Glaze 1050'c Recipe   
    I use 90 Ferro Frit 3124, 10 EPK, and 2 bentonite, fired to cone 03. Cone 04 will work too, you may be able to go even lower. If it crazes, substitute some Frit 3249 for the 3124. Be sure to test because the chemestry of the frit may not be compatible with some of the underglazes. Other than that this is a super easy and reliable lowfire clear.
  15. Like
    tinbucket reacted to Marcia Selsor in Ceramic Wall Panel Heaters   
    when I was a resident artist/caretaker in Upstate NY, I heated a studio with a wood stove and overnight with a kerosene heater.We had a German shepherd who would stay up all night with me when I fired my gas kiln. She would dose off sitting up. I split a lot of logs for that stove. -sledge hammer and a wedge on a stump.
     
    Youth!
     
    Marcia
  16. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Celadon - Application?   
    Adding water + epsom salt or epsom salt alone should help you get a more even application and less drips
  17. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from Min in Celadon - Application?   
    Adding water + epsom salt or epsom salt alone should help you get a more even application and less drips
  18. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from D.M.Ernst in Pulling Walls   
    Adam Field''s cylinder video on ceramic arts daily youtube channel really help me in the beginning. One more tip - don't take your hands off the pot/wheel too quickly
  19. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from LeeU in Chawan, Yonomi, Tea Bowl, Tea Cup, Mug.......   
    The followig link is a great resource for these kinds of questions
     
    http://www.e-yakimono.net/html/whatiswhat.html
  20. Like
    tinbucket reacted to Chilly in Hollow Cast Handles   
    After draining, I leave the mould laying with the handle down, and with a syringe/long-handled tea-spoon add more slip to the hollows where the handles are.  It can be time-consuming as you have to top-up a few times.  The same problem (worse?) occurs when slip-casting them separately, it takes forever to fill them completely as the slip dries out faster at the pour holes and then blocks.  Hollow handles are OK, but can sometimes get too hot to handle.
     
    Test the thickness after casting by slicing them along the length.
  21. Like
    tinbucket got a reaction from TallTayl in Bat "systems"   
    I was searching online a few weeks ago and found this blog post by Jeff Campana. Basically you buy bisque tiles (I got mine at a ceramics warehouse - Bailey) and cut a square hole into a plastic bat, similar to the Wonderbat. It cost me $50 for the bat and 40 tiles, and it has been working wonderfully.
     
    http://jeffcampana.com/d-i-y-tile-bat-system/
  22. Like
    tinbucket reacted to earthfan in Crazing   
    Crazing is the bane of my life, even though I work in stoneware. The thing with earthenware is that the glaze will eventually craze, even though it doesn't do it in the kiln. With use, the absorbent body takes in moisture from the air and dishwater, which makes it expand slightly, which stretches the glaze so that it splits. 
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