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Jo-Ann

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  1. Like
    Jo-Ann got a reaction from Sharon P in Amaco "Potter's choice" glazes   
    None of my tile samples worked, I made them all with three coats, I tried 4 and 5 coats on my pots which have all turned out well except for running, especially the ancient jasper.
     
    This first one has 5 coats, as you can see there was a lot of running but the colour is perfect.
    . Hahaha this is a funny glitch no matter what I do this photo won't post upside right . . . Sorry
     
    This one has four coats, less running colour is still okay but still some drips.

     
    when I did the three coats it was like you said muddy all of theses were fired to cone 6, all holes and lid closed tight and I have a down draft vent.
     
     
    The frosted melon worked very well this has 5 coats and no drips or runs but when I fired the test tile I had a pot glazed in misty mountain blue next to it and the frosted mellon got some yellowing, I thought it looked fine but if you don't want that on your pot you should be carful what you fire next to it.

     
    The olive speckle needed a thick coat as well, this plater started off with four coats and the streaking was terrible sorry i don't have a photo of that but I decided to put another coat of glaze over the already fired piece and refired it, this is what I got . . . I might try another coat and another fire tho

     
    This one is glazed in smokey merlot I think it's called, I'll go look and update that if I'm wrong, I have four coats on this the three coated tile test was muddy

     
    I have a bunch more and a few layering photos if you want I can post those too but but it seems to me the four or 5 coats is what is required with all the Potters choice glazes I have . . . Now maybe what I personally think is a thick coat is actually thin by Potter's Choice standards and that's why I need to put more . . .
     
    The other colours I have are fire brick, palladium and Art Deco green
     
    If you are going to layer you might even want to try more than 4 coats like for example the bowl in this photo is glazed with 2 coats of frosted melon and 2 coats of firebrick I personally don't like it and might try putting another coat of firebrick or even something else just to experiment. . . .







  2. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Rae Reich in What Clay To Use To Make Waterfall For Cat And How To Use Clay?   
    Check out Youtube for interesting tabletop fountains that you can make using found objects. Most commercially made serving bowls (look in thrift stores) used as bases will be food and pet safe. Add a small pump (in a mesh bag is a good suggestion) behind a clean rock pile or small sculpture. I refill mine from a filter pitcher, but it still gets hard water rings which can be removed by scrubbing with a toothbrush and a paste of vinegar and baking soda.
  3. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to rayaldridge in Submit Your Community Challenge Ideas   
    I hope the next challenge will avoid too specific a goal.  I participated in a couple, but I just wasn't interested enough to devote time to a specific form that was narrowly defined.  And at the moment, not interested in tile, though I've made quite a few over the years.
     
    I tend to find the more nebulously defined challenges more thought provoking.
     
    Still, my suggestion is the albarello, or medicine jar.  It's a simple form, but can take many shapes and if we're not sticklers for authenticity, many decorative approaches.
  4. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Chris Campbell in Submit Your Community Challenge Ideas   
    I'd like to see people choose one form ... Bowl, mug, vase, container, casserole ... And execute the form several times using different techniques ... Throwing, coiling, soft slab building, firm slab building, slump molds, hump mods, pinching, free form ... Whatever. Just test how many ways you can get to where you are going.
  5. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Chris Campbell in Large Platter Broke In Half In Bisque Firing. Anything To Do With It?   
    When I am teaching my colored clay/neriage/nerikome classes, my number one piece of advice is ... SLOW DOWN.
     
    Consider all the things you are asking your clay to do ...
    you have colored it, shaped it into patterns or designs ... it has a hundred places it needs to connect ... you have rolled it, stretched and molded it into your idea of a good form.
    That clay has had it!!!
    Give it time to settle, treat it gently as you go forward.
    You have already invested so much time and attention in the production that it is a shame to lose it all by hurrying the firing.
     
    I don't fire slow, but I never fire colored clay on 'fast'. Medium is good.
    I usually use the ramping programs to fire up and do controlled cooling down to 1100. Electric kilns cool much too quickly for many kinds of work.
  6. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Joy pots in Latest Studio Tricks And Tips   
    I use small stencils that I made from clear plastic used for table cloths. They bend around the pot. I glaze the piece first then use a stain with a stencil brush that I load with stain in a small tub that has a piece of folded t-shirt material in the bottom. I add stain & water sparingly & load the brush. It works very well the water keeps the stain from becoming to strong to prevent it from running on the glaze during firing.
    Joy
  7. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Magnolia Mud Researdh in Latest Studio Tricks And Tips   
    I use a pad cut from a roll of  thin open weave plastic drawer liner.  It helps with bat stability and wheel head cleanup.  Cut to fit either the wheel head or the shape of the bats.  Have both.
    LT
  8. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Fallon in Slip And Crochet   
    Heres a picture of two of the pieces I dipped the other day!
  9. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Stephen in Whining...just A Little   
    I cannot even begin to imagine what 275 customers in a day would feel like but it would certainly include a celebration at the end.
  10. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to MatthewV in Community Challenge #5   
    The watercolor Sky Blue and Black based loosely on some aspects of the Jackson Browne song Sky Blue and Black is what I am going for.  
    The leather hard tiles. Currently 6x8" each. With iron oxide and combinations of zinc-cobalt in slips and clays. The final glazing will be done with clear/tenmoku/cobalt blue.
  11. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to jrgpots in Community Challenge #5   
    This is my initial design for the mural.  Each tile will be 7'' x 10'' when wet.  The picture is one I took of a 1,00 year-old bristle cone  pine overlooking  Cedar Breaks Monument, Utah.
     
    Jed


  12. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Rebekah Krieger in Community Challenge #4   
    Ok it came out. I was trying to encourage cobalt bleeding but it was more of a dripping instead of bleeding. If I had more time I would have worked on the sculpture more.
     
    Final entry


  13. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Babs in What Weight Of Clay For Wool Bowls   
    Back to the drawing board when the relies leave.
    These survived the possum onslaught.



  14. Like
    Jo-Ann got a reaction from GiselleNo5 in Amaco "Potter's choice" glazes   
    None of my tile samples worked, I made them all with three coats, I tried 4 and 5 coats on my pots which have all turned out well except for running, especially the ancient jasper.
     
    This first one has 5 coats, as you can see there was a lot of running but the colour is perfect.
    . Hahaha this is a funny glitch no matter what I do this photo won't post upside right . . . Sorry
     
    This one has four coats, less running colour is still okay but still some drips.

     
    when I did the three coats it was like you said muddy all of theses were fired to cone 6, all holes and lid closed tight and I have a down draft vent.
     
     
    The frosted melon worked very well this has 5 coats and no drips or runs but when I fired the test tile I had a pot glazed in misty mountain blue next to it and the frosted mellon got some yellowing, I thought it looked fine but if you don't want that on your pot you should be carful what you fire next to it.

     
    The olive speckle needed a thick coat as well, this plater started off with four coats and the streaking was terrible sorry i don't have a photo of that but I decided to put another coat of glaze over the already fired piece and refired it, this is what I got . . . I might try another coat and another fire tho

     
    This one is glazed in smokey merlot I think it's called, I'll go look and update that if I'm wrong, I have four coats on this the three coated tile test was muddy

     
    I have a bunch more and a few layering photos if you want I can post those too but but it seems to me the four or 5 coats is what is required with all the Potters choice glazes I have . . . Now maybe what I personally think is a thick coat is actually thin by Potter's Choice standards and that's why I need to put more . . .
     
    The other colours I have are fire brick, palladium and Art Deco green
     
    If you are going to layer you might even want to try more than 4 coats like for example the bowl in this photo is glazed with 2 coats of frosted melon and 2 coats of firebrick I personally don't like it and might try putting another coat of firebrick or even something else just to experiment. . . .







  15. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to ronfire in Throwing Plates, Different Way?   
    I threw 22 plates with raising the rim. the rims stay well with the firing to 6^. 
    I trim a shallow foot  as well as a ring in the middle for support. There is just enough foot to allow clear glaze on the bottom, fortunately the clear glaze does not creep and stick on the shelves.
      I will have to teach my wife to get pics without the glare in them.  
     

     



  16. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Mark C. in Throwing Plates, Different Way?   
    I like a more defined lip on a plate than one that is just raised as in above photo on Chilly's post.
    These wider lips need to be thrown as they will sag at least at high temps if not made right with a curve.
    I agree a plate rim is personal and takes time to master..
    My dinner set I use every day was thrown in 1975 and they are still like that today-I just sold the same type dinnerware set  I have always produced (13 place settings) last Friday.
    The lips are wide and raised. Most commercial ware has that this barely raised lip.
    Mark
    Here was the set last week-its in another state being used everyday now.You can see the wider lips.
     




  17. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to drmyrtle in Community Challenge #4   
    Pics of greenware ewer & hydria. Doubt I'll keep the hydria, tho it might be interesting to check the functionality with the air port. I think the port is too low, so....
     
    Ewer is a keeper so far.






  18. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Sue Edwards in Community Challenge #4   
    I found out this is called Scorpion pose

    Turns out this is as well!

     
    I didn't like the arms stuck down the the side with the side handles, felt like the balance was off. (gravity and all)  So I'm going to cover it and wait until the morning and see what I want to do.  I might have to break the arms and add them down the side.  Maybe have the other leg grow out of the pot, and the hand and arm stay dangling.  Not sure.
     
    I may change my original idea for the front post too.  Not sure how it will work now that the neck is longer than I had originally planned.  Funny how the sketch can change with reality.
     
    Things to ponder...





  19. Like
    Jo-Ann got a reaction from Roberta12 in Knitting Bowls   
    Yarn bowls are my absolute favourite to make, I enjoy making each one different depending on my mood.
    I use stonewear clay, throw a little thicker and cut just before leather hard. I wrap the top in plastic and dry upside down. Sometimes I will use paper wedges to support the swirl part if I notice some sagging (the wedges just burn up in the kiln) 
    after I bisque I sand the swirl as I once used a yarn bowl that didn't have a perfectly smooth swirl and it snagged my yarn and really annoyed me while I was knitting lol so now i'm mindful of how smooth the swirl and inner bowl is. I use a small sharp blade and hand carve all of my cuts, which is why I cut just before leather hard, I find that while there is risk of sagging for me its easier to carve when the clay isn't so stiff. Yarn bowls are my biggest seller. I personally don't like, wont use and wont sell a warped bowl but that's just me being picky. Slow drying, a gentle hand when carving and paper wedges for support helps me avoid warping. 
     
    Here are a bunch of bowls i've made.


  20. Like
    Jo-Ann got a reaction from TribeCreations in Knitting Bowls   
    Yarn bowls are my absolute favourite to make, I enjoy making each one different depending on my mood.
    I use stonewear clay, throw a little thicker and cut just before leather hard. I wrap the top in plastic and dry upside down. Sometimes I will use paper wedges to support the swirl part if I notice some sagging (the wedges just burn up in the kiln) 
    after I bisque I sand the swirl as I once used a yarn bowl that didn't have a perfectly smooth swirl and it snagged my yarn and really annoyed me while I was knitting lol so now i'm mindful of how smooth the swirl and inner bowl is. I use a small sharp blade and hand carve all of my cuts, which is why I cut just before leather hard, I find that while there is risk of sagging for me its easier to carve when the clay isn't so stiff. Yarn bowls are my biggest seller. I personally don't like, wont use and wont sell a warped bowl but that's just me being picky. Slow drying, a gentle hand when carving and paper wedges for support helps me avoid warping. 
     
    Here are a bunch of bowls i've made.


  21. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Community Challenge #4   
    After about 9 attempts at making handles for this pot. I finally got them good enough. Tired of fooling with this thing. I mixed up some bronze green glaze that I plan to use on this pot, as well as some crystal ash glazes in random spots with dark iron under it to make it look like a rust crystalization. At least in my head it looks good. I keep telling my wife I need a projector attached to my brain so I can show her what I have in my head and what I want on my pots. If I could only do that everyone would understand me better.
     
    Anywho. See attached. I am pretty happy with it. It is a slight bit wonky, but it is good enough for me. Now hopefully it will dry in time to get glazed and go to my grandmother for her birthday gift. She helped me buy my kiln so I owe her something, and she likes pottery so.. i guess its about time.
     
     




  22. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Benzine in Community Challenge #4   
    Here's my entry out of the kiln.  Overall, I'm happy with the way it turned out.  Some spots on the exterior, and interior seemed a bit thick.  Sure enough, they were, and caused a small dunting crack toward's the base.  Despite it being fairly cool, when I took it out of the kiln, there was still some pinging.  The glaze I used on the exterior does usually craze, even under normal conditions.  It's meant to be decorative.  I'm honestly not concerned with the crack, as I obviously never intended to use this.
     
    All the glazes are commercial, mostly Amaco bottle, with a couple dry  mixes from Continental Clay.  The main exterior is Amaco Sandstone (The one that likes to craze).  The Hydras have Continental Italian Green in the texture, then sponged off with Amaco Moss Agate over top.  The inside is Continental Tarnished Brass, and it was used on the Hydra's spikes and horns.  There is a bit of Amaco Jewel Brown on the eyes as well.
     
    I also did a little experiment.  I broke off one of the spikes, when rinsing it off.  So I used some of the "######" mender, and glazed over top.  The mender held,until the glaze matured, and now the glaze is holding it on just fine.
     

     

     

     

     

     
    EDIT:
     
    Hahaha!  I just realized the software censored the name of the mender.  It's simply the vinegar, clay powder, corn syrup recipe.  
     
    Also, I'm not sure why one of the photos shows up on its own, while the others only posted the links.  All of them were included in the same way.  Oh well...
     
    EDITED EDIT:  I was able to post the photos differently, so no need to click.  Thanks for the tip(s) High Bridge!
  23. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to ChenowethArts in Community Challenge #4   
    I've never been brave enough to post a 'failed throw' video before so I wanted to give your kudos for sharing.  If you've ever seen a basketball highlight film before, you might assume that every shot that a player makes hits the basket...and we know that isn't so.  There is indeed much to learn from watching attempts. I snagged a couple of ideas from your wedging and centering that I probably haven't considered for a long time.  The whole collaring thing with a pot this size is a challenge and if anything, I learned that the dryer I can keep the clay, the better,  once the basic cylinder is pulled and I am satisfied with wall thickness.  I may still do collaring a a fairly high wheel speed, but for me, the bellying-out/shaping stage is done at a much slower rate.
     
    Again, thanks for posting this.  I want a bunch of Clay II class students to view this...they've been throwing for 2 weeks and wondering how anyone ever throws more than 2 pounds of clay
     
    Peace,
    -Paul
  24. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Rebekah Krieger in Community Challenge #4   
    Here is my update for today. I added my vulture goddess. I also included a reference shot for form inspiration.
     
     
    I threw the belly at 6lb and the top half was 3.5




  25. Like
    Jo-Ann reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Community Challenge #4   
    So just for kicks here is my video of me failing to make this form. I am bringing my shoulders in too flat. I collapsed all 3 pots. The last pot I was just tinkering with to see what I could get away with as far as a blow dryer, never did that before so i wanted to push it as far as i could for experience. The first 2 hunks of clay were about 7-8 pounds the last one was 15. I figured recording myself making this would show me exactly where it went wrong. I think it worked pretty well.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrYNuPLTafE&feature=youtu.be
     
    Video is about 4 minutes. The form is a lot harder to make than I thought it would be. That shoulder gets me because you need to have enough clay to shoulder in and bring up a collar and then make a rim. I think I have how to do it in my head now. I will try more tomorrow.
     
    I have never made this form before, or ever tried to throw this much clay on a tall cylinder, only bowls.
     
    EDIT:
     
    I finally got the form on attempt 4. The neck isn't as tall as I would like, but what ever. I am not spending any more time on throwing another.
     
    I will attach handles tomorrow probably. No idea how I am going to glaze this thing.


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