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neilestrick

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  1. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in Silicon Carbide Shelves   
    I've always made damper slots a half brick in height (1.5"), then blocked the opening gap with a piece of angle iron or flat steel. If the shelf warps, it's only the entry point that's narrow so it can still go in and out. And if it does happen to bind, you can just grind the welds and move the steel. I've also used kilns that have a big gap at the damper shelf entry point, and you just sit a piece of brick on top of the shelf to block the gap. It doesn't have to be perfectly sealed, just not a big hole that would act as a passive damper and spoil draft.
  2. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Mark C. in Old Crusader Kiln and asbestos   
    You really don't need to test the bricks for asbestos. Is it a typical round kiln with the outer metal jacket? If so, the issue is silica, so you should wear a mask when working with the bricks, like if you're replacing a brick and creating dust, but for normal operation of the kiln- loading, unloading, firing, etc.- it's not an issue. Even if it's a kiln with backup fiber insulation that is for some odd  reason asbestos, you're not going to be releasing any fibers during normal kiln operation, as the fiber will be behind the bricks and not exposed.
  3. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Old Crusader Kiln and asbestos   
    You really don't need to test the bricks for asbestos. Is it a typical round kiln with the outer metal jacket? If so, the issue is silica, so you should wear a mask when working with the bricks, like if you're replacing a brick and creating dust, but for normal operation of the kiln- loading, unloading, firing, etc.- it's not an issue. Even if it's a kiln with backup fiber insulation that is for some odd  reason asbestos, you're not going to be releasing any fibers during normal kiln operation, as the fiber will be behind the bricks and not exposed.
  4. Like
    neilestrick reacted to Callum Donovan-Grujicich in Looking for a firing service in Ontario   
    Yes, I will definitely post some pictures. 
  5. Like
    neilestrick reacted to Callum Donovan-Grujicich in Looking for a firing service in Ontario   
    Okay, I have decided to cut the sculpture. Thank you all for your help.
  6. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Looking for a firing service in Ontario   
    Knowing where and how it's going to be fired should be the first thing you do before building something like that, because that will dictate how it's going to be constructed. There are ways of building in sections where the seams become part of the design. In this case, I would cut the thing in half, fire the pieces separately, join them up with epoxy after firing, and fill any gaps with epoxy putty or body filler. Then sand everything smooth to hide the joints, and paint it rather than glazing and firing again. 
  7. Like
    neilestrick reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in What’s on your workbench?   
    A sugar jar from last fall, but playing with photo editing. 

  8. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from PottyMcPot in Dusty bisque firing   
    The rule for loading the kiln is to keep pots at least an inch away from the walls, at least on the walls with elements. This will prevent hot spots from  the pots being too close to the elements.
  9. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Babs in Bisque at cone 10, but glaze at cone 6?   
    If you bisque to cone 10, the clay will be fully vitrified and not at all porous. It will be very difficult to glaze the pots, and the glazes may not work properly. Dipped glazes will be pretty much impossible to apply. Brushed glazes would be possible, but still very difficult since the clay won't absorb the water in the glaze as you apply them. Even if you do manage to get a good glaze application, it could crawl or shiver or do any number of things in the firing.
  10. Like
    neilestrick reacted to Bill Kielb in Bartlett v6-cf malfunction?   
    Here is a handy thing to remember and  May be helpful if from time to time you have the time to observe a Bartlett controlled kiln at the various stages of firing.
    The hot keys.
    Specifically key 5 and observing what rate your kiln can achieve. (Best reviewed near top temp). The eight key is pretty handy as well to see how evenly your zones are performing and the impact of the current cycle time as well as the pid setting in the controller. And finally the zero key for when no one knows how long things have actually been cooking.
    All have provided some insight as to what is truly going on. If you put new elements in it, it’s a great time to see if it can maintain 120f/ hr at the top temp. Many cannot, especially with some wear,  which explains why firing times often vary significantly from the scheduled times.
    @neilestrick @liambesaw
    I should add 45 degrees every 22.5 Minutes is  Approx. 120 degrees per hour ( Makes me crazy! They should Just put it in terms of per hour!)

  11. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Momo in Is frit necessary?   
    Yes! Try mixing the glaze with and without the tin oxide or zircopax or whatever is being used to opacify the glaze and see how it affects your colors. You should be able to dial in the intensity of the colors pretty quickly with a simple line blend. You should be able to get the color you want with just one brush stroke, no multiple layers.
  12. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Momo in Is frit necessary?   
    I wouldn't use 3134. It doesn't melt as nice on its own at low fire temps. Could be rough/bubbly.
  13. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Babs in Is frit necessary?   
    Yes! Try mixing the glaze with and without the tin oxide or zircopax or whatever is being used to opacify the glaze and see how it affects your colors. You should be able to dial in the intensity of the colors pretty quickly with a simple line blend. You should be able to get the color you want with just one brush stroke, no multiple layers.
  14. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Benzine in How to Move Heavy Greenware   
    Best to move it at the leather-hard stage, if it's not too late. It will be strongest then. 
  15. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Benzine in Is frit necessary?   
    I would use the frit. Some stains are fairly refractory, and the frit will help them melt into the majolica glaze, especially since majolica glazes are quite stiff. It will also dilute the stain, so you don't end up with it being too intense. Another thing you can do is use the majolica glaze as a base for your overglaze colors. You'd have to test the proportions that work best, but I'd start with 50/50 and go from there. It all depends on how intense you want the colors to be. Using CMC gum in the mix will make it brush on better, and keep everything suspended in the water, especially if you're just using stain and frit.
  16. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Momo in Is frit necessary?   
    I would use the frit. Some stains are fairly refractory, and the frit will help them melt into the majolica glaze, especially since majolica glazes are quite stiff. It will also dilute the stain, so you don't end up with it being too intense. Another thing you can do is use the majolica glaze as a base for your overglaze colors. You'd have to test the proportions that work best, but I'd start with 50/50 and go from there. It all depends on how intense you want the colors to be. Using CMC gum in the mix will make it brush on better, and keep everything suspended in the water, especially if you're just using stain and frit.
  17. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Pres in Is it possible to use this as a beginner hobby kiln   
    You only need to replace the bricks if the chips are larger than about 1.5 inches, large enough that the elements will sag out of the chip. Blue Diamond kilns closed a few years ago, but Euclids.com will be able to make elements for you.
  18. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Pres in Is it possible to use this as a beginner hobby kiln   
    @Eve From your post it sounds like you haven't worked with clay? I highly recommend taking some classes at a local art center or park district or community college. There is a lot to learn, and it will be easier and faster to learn from a teacher rather than books.
  19. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in What’s on your workbench?   
    Busy day glazing today! These are all waxed and ready to dip.
     

  20. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from liambesaw in Is frit necessary?   
    I would use the frit. Some stains are fairly refractory, and the frit will help them melt into the majolica glaze, especially since majolica glazes are quite stiff. It will also dilute the stain, so you don't end up with it being too intense. Another thing you can do is use the majolica glaze as a base for your overglaze colors. You'd have to test the proportions that work best, but I'd start with 50/50 and go from there. It all depends on how intense you want the colors to be. Using CMC gum in the mix will make it brush on better, and keep everything suspended in the water, especially if you're just using stain and frit.
  21. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Babs in Is frit necessary?   
    I would use the frit. Some stains are fairly refractory, and the frit will help them melt into the majolica glaze, especially since majolica glazes are quite stiff. It will also dilute the stain, so you don't end up with it being too intense. Another thing you can do is use the majolica glaze as a base for your overglaze colors. You'd have to test the proportions that work best, but I'd start with 50/50 and go from there. It all depends on how intense you want the colors to be. Using CMC gum in the mix will make it brush on better, and keep everything suspended in the water, especially if you're just using stain and frit.
  22. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from SRenterprise in Firing in air conditioned studio   
    The AC won't affect the firing, but the firing will affect the AC. Like Liam said, you'll probably want to turn it off until the kiln has cooled most of the way down or else you'll just be wasting energy.
  23. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Babs in How to Move Heavy Greenware   
    Best to move it at the leather-hard stage, if it's not too late. It will be strongest then. 
  24. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Denice in What’s on your workbench?   
    Even better than lineman's pliers, get some mini bolt cutters. I use them for element pigtails and they are sweet.
  25. Like
    neilestrick reacted to Pres in What’s on your workbench?   
    I am working on communion sets, and today is glazing on these chalices. Same number of patens will be fired also in this load.
     
    best,
    Pres

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