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neilestrick

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  1. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from LeeU in Wax resist/ water etching, and signatures   
    The wax that Ceramic Supply Chicago sells will rinse out of brushes with just water. Awesome stuff.
  2. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Benzine in New to the Business   
    You're asking for an awful lot of info, more than we can give you here without pages and pages of typing. It would be good if you could pay the previous owner to spend a couple of days walking you through the entire process. There are a lot of variables that will be specific to your studio depending on what types of equipment you have and what type of slips and glazes you are using. In ceramics, hands-on experience is the best teacher. It would also be good to take a ceramic class from a local art center or community college where you can learn about working with clay and firing kilns. You may not get any experience with slip casting there, but you will get a lot of good general knowledge about clay, glazes and firing.
  3. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from TonyC in L&L E23S-3 Cone 6 Adjustment Needed?   
    If you're using the preheat function, it takes approximately two hours to get to 200F (60F/hr climb) before it starts the hold time you programmed. So about 7 hours if you back out the preheat, which means your firing time was not too long. If anything it went a little fast. There's always some variation, though, so I wouldn't worry about that.
    I'd do the cone offset. Start with 10 degrees like you were thinking. The 18 degree offset is in the thermocouples, not the cones, so you won't see that when you do the programming. The rule  is do a thermocouple offset when it's inaccurate at all temps, do the cone offset when it's only off for the cone you're firing to. It may very well be off at cones 5,  7 and 8, too, but if you don't fire to 5, 7 or 8 it doesn't matter. Since it's correct at bisque temps you should do the cone offset.
  4. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Roberta12 in Drooping elements   
    With L&L elements, they must be seated into the corners when you install them. They ship the elements slightly short, so that means either putting them into the corners so they're springy and under tension, or stretching them further so they lay into the corners without any tension. Personally, I prefer the latter. With new kilns they tend to hold under tension just fine, but with older kilns where everything has shifted a bit it's easier to have them lay into the corners without tension.
    As for your predicament, they should still be quite flexible and stretchy after only one firing, so you should be able to get them into the corners without breaking them. If you have to torch them, do so, but I don't think you'll need to. A little bending here and there with needle nose pliers, and possibly crimping the coils back together where it's drooped a lot and you should be fine.
  5. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Babs in Rough glaze   
    If the underglaze is being applied to bisque ware, the binders in the underglaze can prevent  getting a good glaze layer when dipping, regardless of the thickness of the underglaze.
  6. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Pres in Rough glaze   
    Some underglazes can also get rough because they flux out too much at cone 6. Speedball red and royal blue do that. If you fire them raw, they actually start to gloss over a bit. With glaze on them they bubble and come out rough.
  7. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Pres in Rough glaze   
    We see a huge difference across all brands of underglaze on how the glaze goes on depending on whether or not the underglaze was bisque fired. Amaco seems to be the worst, but it happens with all of them. The binders that make the underglaze brushable act like a shell, making it less porous than the raw clay, and therefore giving a thinner glaze layer. If you bisque fire the underglazes, the binders burn out and it's not an issue. Thickness can definitely be an issue, too, but ronfire could be getting a double whammy if the under glaze is too thick and not bisque fired before glazing.
  8. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Pres in Rough glaze   
    If the underglaze is being applied to bisque ware, the binders in the underglaze can prevent  getting a good glaze layer when dipping, regardless of the thickness of the underglaze.
  9. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Rae Reich in Crash Cooling...Deliberately   
    This is an excellent point. I fire down in my baby kiln, to match the slower cooling rates of my bigger kilns. My glazes look terrible when cooled fast. Just awful.
  10. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Rae Reich in Crash Cooling...Deliberately   
    It would all depend on what type of clay you're using, what forms you're firing, and how thick and evenly constructed they are. Lots of variables. Remember that raku firing uses very under-fired bodies, which handle thermal shock better than vitrified bodies.
    I've got a little test kiln that I can get to cone 6 in 5-6 hours, and it can cool fast enough to unload 5-6 hours later. It's so small that there's not much mass to cool down, though. My big kiln takes more like 32 hours to cool because of how much work is in there. Cooling it by pulling air though is a tricky situation, because it won't cool evenly that way. You can crash cool down to red heat without much problem, but getting through quartz inversion in a rush is tricky.
    If I remember correctly, tile companies that turn them around super fast are dry pressing the tiles under extreme pressure, which makes for a very stable form. Plus tiles have very low mass, and if they're doing non-vitrified wall tiles, they don't have to worry much about warpage.
  11. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Roberta12 in Rough glaze   
    The problem is as I described above. The additives in the underglaze that make it brushable are preventing a good glaze coat. Try applying your underglaze at bone dry and then bisque firing. The underglaze will go on very similar to on bisque since bone dry is very porous.
  12. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Russ in Crash Cooling...Deliberately   
    This is an excellent point. I fire down in my baby kiln, to match the slower cooling rates of my bigger kilns. My glazes look terrible when cooled fast. Just awful.
  13. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from curt in Crash Cooling...Deliberately   
    It would all depend on what type of clay you're using, what forms you're firing, and how thick and evenly constructed they are. Lots of variables. Remember that raku firing uses very under-fired bodies, which handle thermal shock better than vitrified bodies.
    I've got a little test kiln that I can get to cone 6 in 5-6 hours, and it can cool fast enough to unload 5-6 hours later. It's so small that there's not much mass to cool down, though. My big kiln takes more like 32 hours to cool because of how much work is in there. Cooling it by pulling air though is a tricky situation, because it won't cool evenly that way. You can crash cool down to red heat without much problem, but getting through quartz inversion in a rush is tricky.
    If I remember correctly, tile companies that turn them around super fast are dry pressing the tiles under extreme pressure, which makes for a very stable form. Plus tiles have very low mass, and if they're doing non-vitrified wall tiles, they don't have to worry much about warpage.
  14. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from oldlady in Crash Cooling...Deliberately   
    It would all depend on what type of clay you're using, what forms you're firing, and how thick and evenly constructed they are. Lots of variables. Remember that raku firing uses very under-fired bodies, which handle thermal shock better than vitrified bodies.
    I've got a little test kiln that I can get to cone 6 in 5-6 hours, and it can cool fast enough to unload 5-6 hours later. It's so small that there's not much mass to cool down, though. My big kiln takes more like 32 hours to cool because of how much work is in there. Cooling it by pulling air though is a tricky situation, because it won't cool evenly that way. You can crash cool down to red heat without much problem, but getting through quartz inversion in a rush is tricky.
    If I remember correctly, tile companies that turn them around super fast are dry pressing the tiles under extreme pressure, which makes for a very stable form. Plus tiles have very low mass, and if they're doing non-vitrified wall tiles, they don't have to worry much about warpage.
  15. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Rae Reich in Bowl fired on rim?   
    You don't have to bisque fire waster slabs. Just make sure they're dry. And put a coat of alumina wax on them so the pots won't stick.
  16. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from terrim8 in Bowl fired on rim?   
    You don't have to bisque fire waster slabs. Just make sure they're dry. And put a coat of alumina wax on them so the pots won't stick.
  17. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from liambesaw in Bowl fired on rim?   
    Most clay bodies I've used shrink very little during bisque. Plus my theory is that the pot isn't going to be hot enough to deform by the time the waster catches up.
  18. Like
    neilestrick reacted to Stephen in Ceramics Studio Business Model - Expenses and Tips   
    Took a look at that in my area and decided that the number of members might not do it here and unless in a walk-able shopping/tourist area we didn't think the gallery would support the effort alone. In my case the expenses for renting what we saw as on the small side was about 4 grand a month with rent/triple net and utilities and that essentially penciled out to having about 50 paying members at all times to make it work without employees. You have to decide on employees because members will span mornings and evenings 7 days a week and if you try to scale that back it could seriously impact the number of members.
    Trying to make up losses with gallery sales just to break even might work but seems risky. When I ran various projections with various scenarios it just got crazy risky with possibly tens of thousands in losses very quickly and just seemed unlikely to make it long term. I know a guy in the NW who has failed three times and the forth is currently working out (and has for a dozen years) but I think you have to really key on what your ramp will be on adding members and how you will weather the storm if membership drops off or fluctuates
    Good luck!.    
  19. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Hulk in Ceramics Studio Business Model - Expenses and Tips   
    I agree with Callie. The costs will be specific to your operation because of differences in rent, utilities, and what you're able to charge per student. It's just going to be a matter of crunching the numbers there.
    I can tell you that the one thing my students really like, compared to other studios, is that once they've paid for an 8 week session, there aren't a bunch of little fees that nickel and dime them to death. Tuition charge cover open studio time, too. Clay prices include glazing and firing. If you want them to keep coming back, don't make them feel like it costs them every time they walk in. It's also a lot easier for me as the owner to not have to be dealing with the money all the time.
  20. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Chilly in Firing to cone 10 with an electric kiln?!   
    There is almost nothing you can do at cone 10 oxidation that you can't do at cone 6 oxidation. The big difference between most cone 10 and cone 6 work is that most people who fire cone 10 do so in a reduction atmosphere. In oxidation there's no need to go that hot.
  21. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from dhPotter in Kiln never got to cone 6, should I wait longer?   
    It's not elitism, it's a safety issue. The  rule is that you don't run a gas kiln indoors without a vent hood. The issue is not with the 30+ times that it worked fine, it's about the one time that it does not work fine, and there's no way to direct the rising heat out of the garage. It's an insurance policy. You probably won't need it, but you'll be glad you have it if you do.
    I have seen gas kilns where the kiln exploded and another where the door was blown off due to gas buildup. Another where the flames grew to several feet due to a regulator issue. Another where the floor gave out and kiln collapsed. Another where the lid cracked in half, etc. Everything's fine until it isn't. The solution doesn't have to be something expensive. Simply moving the kiln outdoors solves the problem. You'll have to plan your firings around the weather, but it will be safer.
  22. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Babs in Kiln never got to cone 6, should I wait longer?   
    It's not elitism, it's a safety issue. The  rule is that you don't run a gas kiln indoors without a vent hood. The issue is not with the 30+ times that it worked fine, it's about the one time that it does not work fine, and there's no way to direct the rising heat out of the garage. It's an insurance policy. You probably won't need it, but you'll be glad you have it if you do.
    I have seen gas kilns where the kiln exploded and another where the door was blown off due to gas buildup. Another where the flames grew to several feet due to a regulator issue. Another where the floor gave out and kiln collapsed. Another where the lid cracked in half, etc. Everything's fine until it isn't. The solution doesn't have to be something expensive. Simply moving the kiln outdoors solves the problem. You'll have to plan your firings around the weather, but it will be safer.
  23. Like
    neilestrick reacted to liambesaw in Kiln never got to cone 6, should I wait longer?   
    The majority of us don't have a studio and work out of our garages, there's nothing elite about safety, we just see something like that and it's concerning.
  24. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Chilly in Porcelain and white earthenware mixed up in kiln - which glaze to use?   
    Or put a small mark on one of them.
  25. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Neph Sy solubility and aluminum   
    Could you be more specific? Are you talking about clay or glazes? Do you mean aluminum pitting in a pug mill? 
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