Jump to content

GiselleNo5

Members
  • Content Count

    1,267
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Instagram or Facebook or ??? What?   
    Last year the changes were so new that no good articles were out about them yet. All the information I found was based on the old system. But this reminded me that it's been around awhile and so I just found two good ones. 

    https://later.com/blog/how-instagram-algorithm-works/
    https://sproutsocial.com/insights/instagram-algorithm/
     
  2. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from PotterPutter in Instagram or Facebook or ??? What?   
    Last year the changes were so new that no good articles were out about them yet. All the information I found was based on the old system. But this reminded me that it's been around awhile and so I just found two good ones. 

    https://later.com/blog/how-instagram-algorithm-works/
    https://sproutsocial.com/insights/instagram-algorithm/
     
  3. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Instagram or Facebook or ??? What?   
    I am more excited about that app called Later than how the algorithm works. That app is exactly what I have been looking for. I hate using my phone to type a post and here lately I have stopped posting because I like to type the 2000 limit for engagement purposes and as a microblog for my ideas. However, it is so frustrating typing on a phone. 
    Thanks for the articles Giselle!
    Tried the app. Didn't like it at all. Uninstalled. I will just keep copy and paste between two documents. 
  4. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from GEP in Instagram or Facebook or ??? What?   
    Last year the changes were so new that no good articles were out about them yet. All the information I found was based on the old system. But this reminded me that it's been around awhile and so I just found two good ones. 

    https://later.com/blog/how-instagram-algorithm-works/
    https://sproutsocial.com/insights/instagram-algorithm/
     
  5. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from D.M.Ernst in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    So very, very true.  
  6. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Joseph Fireborn in EXTREMELY Important Article About Dust In The Studio   
    It seems crazy to me too. Every now and then I will see an old video or a documentary on a famous old potter. There is always the video of them in their workshop. Some of them have insanely dirty studios. I mean like the floor is made of mud and the walls are coated with clay. 
     
  7. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to GEP in Stacking Pots Rim To Rim In Glaze Firing   
    I have seen how tweaking a design, a few millimeters here and a few millimeters there, will mean I can fit seven on a shelf instead of five. I have also seen how sometimes a good sellable design just isn't worth the amount of space it needs in the kiln. You will be forced to think about these things out of necessity, and you will gain from it.
  8. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to GEP in Stacking Pots Rim To Rim In Glaze Firing   
    I started with a 3cf kiln. I used it for about 2 years, then bought a bigger one. It can work for the time being. You'll be firing it a lot, that's all.
  9. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Stacking Pots Rim To Rim In Glaze Firing   
    Thanks for all the comments and suggestions folks. I appreciate them. Just gonna keep doing what I'm doing!
  10. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from preeta in Stacking Pots Rim To Rim In Glaze Firing   
    I used to pack my glaze kilns as full as possible but I learned the hard way with items ruined by fuming and dripping to leave enough space that my hand can pass between. 



     
    I do a lot of work that I leave portions unglazed to show the clay but if it's going to be used for food I always glaze any portion that people will have to touch a lot. My mugs, I glaze the handle as well as the rim (a little over 1/4" on the rim). I have some that I've applied the glaze to the interior and left the exterior including the rim and handle bare and those mugs just never sell. Fortunately I figured it out after only doing that with a couple so I don't have too many items that are just sitting here. 
     
    In the photo I don't know if you can tell (I applied the clear a tad too thickly to this one) but I carve a little well around the base of the handle and also around the portion at the top. This makes glazing it much easier as the glaze has somewhere to stop even when applied too thickly. The glaze tends to fill the little wells and render them invisible. 

    I realize this is NOT the question you were asking Joseph but I always think information is useful and who knows, this may give some ideas as to how to handle your kiln. 
     
    A side note: When I'm firing a kiln load of these pieces I actually put them real close to each other to encourage the clear gloss coat of the glaze to fume onto the other pieces. It gives it a really interesting look, I think just a little reminiscent of wood fired pieces I've seen. Gives the decoration more depth and interest in my opinion.
  11. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Roberta12 in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    Callie, I couldn't even center the clay for the first six months. 
     
    I connected with some specific potters online in the first year of throwing. They were about where I was in skill level although they had been throwing longer, and some of them were where I was in the amount of time they had been learning. None of them had the struggle I did to center or to just make basic pots. Some even said that they threw something successful the first time they sat down at the wheel, whereas for me it was something like 40-50 lbs of recycled clay before I had ONE POT that did not fail. 
     
    The interesting thing to me is that I have now been throwing for 2 1/2 years and I still can see videos of the same hobby or small business potters throwing and they appear to be in the same place they were two years ago, while my throwing, which was horribly stunted at first, has improved to where I feel I can call myself competent. I sometimes wonder if because I have worked so hard for every scrap of skill I have, I am aggressive about holding onto it and refining on it. Perhaps, as some have said on this thread, if it had come easily to me it would have no value and I would have lost interest. 
  12. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Pres in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    I like this!! Something tells me I would enjoy having you for a teacher, Pres!  
  13. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Pres in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    While teaching, it was my set policy to always give the student at least 3 choices when asked to solve a problem for them. Kept things from being too much the "Teachers pot". Also demonstrated on another piece of clay whenever possible, not on their pot.
     
    best,
    Pres
  14. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    Callie, I couldn't even center the clay for the first six months. 
     
    I connected with some specific potters online in the first year of throwing. They were about where I was in skill level although they had been throwing longer, and some of them were where I was in the amount of time they had been learning. None of them had the struggle I did to center or to just make basic pots. Some even said that they threw something successful the first time they sat down at the wheel, whereas for me it was something like 40-50 lbs of recycled clay before I had ONE POT that did not fail. 
     
    The interesting thing to me is that I have now been throwing for 2 1/2 years and I still can see videos of the same hobby or small business potters throwing and they appear to be in the same place they were two years ago, while my throwing, which was horribly stunted at first, has improved to where I feel I can call myself competent. I sometimes wonder if because I have worked so hard for every scrap of skill I have, I am aggressive about holding onto it and refining on it. Perhaps, as some have said on this thread, if it had come easily to me it would have no value and I would have lost interest. 
  15. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from LeeU in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    I feel almost a little bit insulted to have all the years of hard work and study, teaching myself to throw and largely teaching myself other ceramic techniques dismissed as "talent". If I have any talent it is in a strong sense of color and composition that I think I've had since childhood, and in a dogged persistence to get things "right". Gary Larsen, creator of the Far Side comic, said that his most important piece of equipment was his eraser. In every batch I make adjustments to refine my work.
     
    Every chance I get, I tell people: you have to spend a lot of time and make a lot of not-good stuff to get to making the good stuff. I firmly believe that every person is creative in their own way and just as firmly believe that most people never find their creativity or if they do have a creative hobby, they are bound by fear and prevent themselves from being totally free, making mistakes, failing, and through those mistakes and failures eventually creating work that is individually expressive of their inner person. 
     
    Years ago I made a costume for a party out of satin which is my least-favorite fabric of all time to sew with. When we cut out the bodice the fabric was not perfectly flat or aligned with the grain and it resulted in a misshapen piece cut on the bias. We discarded that portion of the dress and cut a totally new bodice. When we went to the party we met a girl who had made her own dress, also out of satin. I could see at once that she had a similar problem with the bodice fabric. Only, she had not stopped, re-cut the piece, and done that portion over. The result was a crooked neckline, misshapen sides, and puckered seams because with satin every single mistake shows. I remember looking at that and realizing, it's not that I am a perfect seamstress. It's that when it is not right, I stop, pick out the stitches, and start over, no matter how much I don't want to redo it. 

    This is a habit that has happily carried over into my work with ceramics, although it is not quite as easy to "pick out the stitches" or "erase" and add a new piece of clay.   
  16. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Pres in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    I think that often whether it is success in business, or with talent, or in most anything in life, being a problem solver is important. If you come up to a problem or some sort of limitation to moving forward, and cannot figure a way around or through it, and just give up then what? There is without the determination to solve the problem, there is not persistence and the tendency to go from on effort to another without finishing anything.
     
     
    best,
    Pres
  17. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    I fnd this post to be enormously reassuring, in that mistakes that you make in your own business are surviveable, even if they'd probably get you fired if you were working for someone else. And each one of those things on that list is something I would totally do, or have done!
     
    In regards to the article, I'm torn. I'm going to preface this by saying that 1) I have been guilty at some point of every single one of these negative attitudes, and 2) the only person in my very first throwing class who was worse than I was failed out at Christmas. I had, unquestionably, the least amount of talent in that group. To my knowledge, out of that group from the fall of 1997, I am the only one still working in clay. Talent counts for very little once you're past the beginning, or all of those artists who had some incredible abilities would still be at it. I keep in touch with many of them, and they have beautiful lives that they enjoy and are happy in, and they don't feel the loss. When I stopped making art, or did it extremely timidly for about a decade, I did feel that loss sorely. So I started again. I have spent a long number of years learning bitterly and the hard way that you can't wait for inspiration, you do indeed have to run after it and beat it down some days. I think it's much less painful if you learn how to romance your creative abilities around to your way of thinking and on to your own schedule, however. Because I have lived without my creativity in the past, I know now that want that creativity at my disposal rather than being at its mercy. So I have chosen to be professional in my practice, because I believe it's a more sustainable way to work in the long run. I know that if you want to make a living at this, you definitely have to be organized and have some marketing skills, and you need to treat it like it IS a real job. I firmly believe that you need to use your creative abilities to make a living, you need to be able to make them work for you, rather than the other way around.
     
    If it does not matter to you that your living comes from selling your art, and you just want to make it for the joy of it, then you shouldn't let anyone else define your success for you. It's your life, not anyone else's, and I think amateurs or even dilettantes should stop being ashamed if that's what makes them happy. Not everything that has value has to be a monetarialy profitable pursuit. Do whatever you need to in order to put food on the table, and do what you need to do to have the life you want. And there is nothing written anywhere that says you have to do this your whole life, if that's not what you want.
     
    But if you do want the money, you do have to take some specific steps. And those steps happen to be in line with the things I want in my life.
  18. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Marcia Selsor in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    I am not sure what talent "is". Competence, standards of excellence? I have always gone back to Leach's In search of Standards. I think that is the title. Not being able to draw a straight line is often used as a reference for one not being an artist. Ridiculous concept.
     
    I like the previous statement of the next piece being embedded in the current one. We learn, and grow in response to what we've done.
     
    Marcia
  19. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Roberta12 in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    I feel almost a little bit insulted to have all the years of hard work and study, teaching myself to throw and largely teaching myself other ceramic techniques dismissed as "talent". If I have any talent it is in a strong sense of color and composition that I think I've had since childhood, and in a dogged persistence to get things "right". Gary Larsen, creator of the Far Side comic, said that his most important piece of equipment was his eraser. In every batch I make adjustments to refine my work.
     
    Every chance I get, I tell people: you have to spend a lot of time and make a lot of not-good stuff to get to making the good stuff. I firmly believe that every person is creative in their own way and just as firmly believe that most people never find their creativity or if they do have a creative hobby, they are bound by fear and prevent themselves from being totally free, making mistakes, failing, and through those mistakes and failures eventually creating work that is individually expressive of their inner person. 
     
    Years ago I made a costume for a party out of satin which is my least-favorite fabric of all time to sew with. When we cut out the bodice the fabric was not perfectly flat or aligned with the grain and it resulted in a misshapen piece cut on the bias. We discarded that portion of the dress and cut a totally new bodice. When we went to the party we met a girl who had made her own dress, also out of satin. I could see at once that she had a similar problem with the bodice fabric. Only, she had not stopped, re-cut the piece, and done that portion over. The result was a crooked neckline, misshapen sides, and puckered seams because with satin every single mistake shows. I remember looking at that and realizing, it's not that I am a perfect seamstress. It's that when it is not right, I stop, pick out the stitches, and start over, no matter how much I don't want to redo it. 

    This is a habit that has happily carried over into my work with ceramics, although it is not quite as easy to "pick out the stitches" or "erase" and add a new piece of clay.   
  20. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    I feel almost a little bit insulted to have all the years of hard work and study, teaching myself to throw and largely teaching myself other ceramic techniques dismissed as "talent". If I have any talent it is in a strong sense of color and composition that I think I've had since childhood, and in a dogged persistence to get things "right". Gary Larsen, creator of the Far Side comic, said that his most important piece of equipment was his eraser. In every batch I make adjustments to refine my work.
     
    Every chance I get, I tell people: you have to spend a lot of time and make a lot of not-good stuff to get to making the good stuff. I firmly believe that every person is creative in their own way and just as firmly believe that most people never find their creativity or if they do have a creative hobby, they are bound by fear and prevent themselves from being totally free, making mistakes, failing, and through those mistakes and failures eventually creating work that is individually expressive of their inner person. 
     
    Years ago I made a costume for a party out of satin which is my least-favorite fabric of all time to sew with. When we cut out the bodice the fabric was not perfectly flat or aligned with the grain and it resulted in a misshapen piece cut on the bias. We discarded that portion of the dress and cut a totally new bodice. When we went to the party we met a girl who had made her own dress, also out of satin. I could see at once that she had a similar problem with the bodice fabric. Only, she had not stopped, re-cut the piece, and done that portion over. The result was a crooked neckline, misshapen sides, and puckered seams because with satin every single mistake shows. I remember looking at that and realizing, it's not that I am a perfect seamstress. It's that when it is not right, I stop, pick out the stitches, and start over, no matter how much I don't want to redo it. 

    This is a habit that has happily carried over into my work with ceramics, although it is not quite as easy to "pick out the stitches" or "erase" and add a new piece of clay.   
  21. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Chris Campbell in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    I feel almost a little bit insulted to have all the years of hard work and study, teaching myself to throw and largely teaching myself other ceramic techniques dismissed as "talent". If I have any talent it is in a strong sense of color and composition that I think I've had since childhood, and in a dogged persistence to get things "right". Gary Larsen, creator of the Far Side comic, said that his most important piece of equipment was his eraser. In every batch I make adjustments to refine my work.
     
    Every chance I get, I tell people: you have to spend a lot of time and make a lot of not-good stuff to get to making the good stuff. I firmly believe that every person is creative in their own way and just as firmly believe that most people never find their creativity or if they do have a creative hobby, they are bound by fear and prevent themselves from being totally free, making mistakes, failing, and through those mistakes and failures eventually creating work that is individually expressive of their inner person. 
     
    Years ago I made a costume for a party out of satin which is my least-favorite fabric of all time to sew with. When we cut out the bodice the fabric was not perfectly flat or aligned with the grain and it resulted in a misshapen piece cut on the bias. We discarded that portion of the dress and cut a totally new bodice. When we went to the party we met a girl who had made her own dress, also out of satin. I could see at once that she had a similar problem with the bodice fabric. Only, she had not stopped, re-cut the piece, and done that portion over. The result was a crooked neckline, misshapen sides, and puckered seams because with satin every single mistake shows. I remember looking at that and realizing, it's not that I am a perfect seamstress. It's that when it is not right, I stop, pick out the stitches, and start over, no matter how much I don't want to redo it. 

    This is a habit that has happily carried over into my work with ceramics, although it is not quite as easy to "pick out the stitches" or "erase" and add a new piece of clay.   
  22. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Pres in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    Several times as a teacher, we would discuss the types of students we would see. All too often, it was the one that was driven, or worked hard at everything whether they had talent or not, they loved what they were doing and driven to do better. On the other hand we had a saying that will offend some of you. When describing a talented kid, one who had everything going, knew it, acted like it, but were too lazy to finish most anything because it bored them or it was just an assignment. . . . wasted meat. Sad, but all too often would be that way. When talking about a professional in business, how many struggle to learn and overcome, and make it because they persevered. How many that seemingly  had it all in the bag, because they were sooooo talented, were just a flash in the pan!
     
    For Mea,
    I realize that this is a business forum, but the door about professional and amateur was opened up, at the same time the nine common mistakes, stand for almost anything in life. Just change the titles to see how it sounds, too bad some of the lessons are never learned and things like a business plan are often not taught in many venues.
     
     
    best,
    Pres
  23. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    So very, very true.  
  24. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to oldlady in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    i have had "art and fear" for years but i am afraid to open it.
     
    giselle, years ago ceramics monthly had an article about a potter whose goal was modest.  seven bowls a day for seven weeks.  the photo of the final result showed about a billion bowls laid out on the floor of a huge space.  i am no good at math, someone who is can multiply it.
  25. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Roberta12 in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    I have a quote in my sketchbook that says "When you are lazy, your art is lazy, when you hold back, it holds back, when you hesitate it stands there staring, hands in pockets. But when you commit, it comes on like blazes."  I think this is from Art and Fear that Joseph mentioned.  I find that quote to be true in most things.
     
    Recently I was having dinner with family and friends, and I said that I realize that most people think they are paying me a compliment when they say "you are so talented!"  when I explained to the group that I almost resent this comment because I really really work at making pots.  My husband said, but you are talented!  And I told him no, I don't believe that I have any more talent than anyone else, but what I bring to the table (the clay table, as it were) is persistence.  Pure and simple.  A willingness to fail and perhaps look stupid, but to keep trying.  Thanks for sharing Mea.  Hope your show goes well this weekend.
    Roberta
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.