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GiselleNo5

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  1. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Instagram or Facebook or ??? What?   
    Last year the changes were so new that no good articles were out about them yet. All the information I found was based on the old system. But this reminded me that it's been around awhile and so I just found two good ones. 

    https://later.com/blog/how-instagram-algorithm-works/
    https://sproutsocial.com/insights/instagram-algorithm/
     
  2. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from PotterPutter in Instagram or Facebook or ??? What?   
    Last year the changes were so new that no good articles were out about them yet. All the information I found was based on the old system. But this reminded me that it's been around awhile and so I just found two good ones. 

    https://later.com/blog/how-instagram-algorithm-works/
    https://sproutsocial.com/insights/instagram-algorithm/
     
  3. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Instagram or Facebook or ??? What?   
    I am more excited about that app called Later than how the algorithm works. That app is exactly what I have been looking for. I hate using my phone to type a post and here lately I have stopped posting because I like to type the 2000 limit for engagement purposes and as a microblog for my ideas. However, it is so frustrating typing on a phone. 
    Thanks for the articles Giselle!
    Tried the app. Didn't like it at all. Uninstalled. I will just keep copy and paste between two documents. 
  4. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from GEP in Instagram or Facebook or ??? What?   
    Last year the changes were so new that no good articles were out about them yet. All the information I found was based on the old system. But this reminded me that it's been around awhile and so I just found two good ones. 

    https://later.com/blog/how-instagram-algorithm-works/
    https://sproutsocial.com/insights/instagram-algorithm/
     
  5. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from D.M.Ernst in Nine Warning Signs Of An Amateur Artist   
    So very, very true.  
  6. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to dhPotter in Amaco dip/brush glaze compatibility issue ... help!!   
    The thing about using Britt's book - the glazes have been tried and trued. All you have to do is mix them up. Sure you need to test to see if they will work with your clay. But it is not like you are inventing the wheel. The heavy lifting has been done for you. Get the book and look through it. Figure out which glazes you would like to try. Get the materials needed. There probably are only a handful of materials you really need. After testing the glazes by themselves, then do what Neil suggested, layer them to see what falls out as nice. Say you have 8 glazes. Take a cylinder and divide it into 8 segments. Dip each cylinder in a different glaze. Now brush every other glaze over the dipped glaze in its respective segment. Now you can test each glaze over every other glaze.
    Look at a glaze's Si:Al Ratio. The bigger the spread between the ratios the more running, streaking. For instance: Val's turqoiuse is 12.97, SH Copper Ash is 4.48. A lot of interaction going on here, a lot of beautiful streaking. Because, each glaze has something the other is lacking. Val's Turquoise has a lot of silica and a little alumina. SH Copper Ash has a lot of alumina and a little silica. BTW, I picked this tip up from reading this forum.
    You can do it!
  7. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to neilestrick in Amaco dip/brush glaze compatibility issue ... help!!   
    The moral of this story is that there are many limitations to what you can do with commercial glazes. There is no ability to tweak them to fit your needs- they either work or they don't. If you can't get this to work, and if mixing your own glazes is not an option for you, then keep testing and hopefully you'll find something that does work. If you like dipping, then focus on testing glazes that you know you can buy in dry form and mix up for dipping. You don't have to stick with Amaco, although their glazes are great. Remember that many glazes that are kinda boring on their own can do some pretty amazing things when overlapped with other glazes. 
  8. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to neilestrick in Amaco dip/brush glaze compatibility issue ... help!!   
    When you add gum to a glaze, it holds more water. So if you add gum and then thin it down to dip, you'll be dipping into a glaze that has more water than a typical glaze. So if you normally dip for say a 6 count, that glaze with gum dipped for the same count won't give you the same thickness of application. So you'll have to either dip longer, assuming the pot is thick enough to take in that much water, or you'll have to dip more than once. That may work fine for the first dip, but it's not so great if you're doing it as a second dip like you are , because the pot will already be somewhat wet from the first dip, and if you let it dry completely before doing the second dip, adding that much water to the first dip will mess it up. You may be able to find a happy medium, but I think it will be imperfect and a lot of hassle even if you do get it to work.
    Have you tried a different black glaze?
  9. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Amaco dip/brush glaze compatibility issue ... help!!   
    Sounds like you might want to spray with an airbrush or something to get the next set of glazes sticking instead of brushing them. This would keep from disturbing the layer.  I don't do much dipping so I had forgotten how fragile it can be. Sprayed is completely different. Just another thought. You could also try an atomizer, though I am not sure how much extra glazes you are applying.
    EDIT: Also why not dip and immediately brush while its wet? Have you tried that?
  10. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Joseph Fireborn in EXTREMELY Important Article About Dust In The Studio   
    It seems crazy to me too. Every now and then I will see an old video or a documentary on a famous old potter. There is always the video of them in their workshop. Some of them have insanely dirty studios. I mean like the floor is made of mud and the walls are coated with clay. 
     
  11. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to mousey in Bad Habits with Manganese   
    Not to minimize the danger, but a lot of people worked their entire lives around manganese fumes/dust and very few developed the horrific permanent nervous system issues traditionally associated with it.  Point being, its not an instant death sentence, and thats coming from someone who really once thought it more or less was.
    Also manganese isnt water soluble, it cant be absorbed through the skin (according to an employee of Aardvark I reached out to about these exact concerns).  
    Do what is needful to work with it responsibly from now on, but its extremely unlikely you've lit the fuse on any neurological time bombs already.
  12. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to dhPotter in Bad Habits with Manganese   
    No matter what kind of clay you use - get rid of the canvas. Use cement board, the stuff used for tiled showers.
  13. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Dick White in Moon Jars - What Are The Rules To The Form?   
    I read the PMI article about using the pipe fittings, and being a cheap SOB, decided I could do the same for free. Get a large plastic soft drink cup (7-11 Big Gulp or similar) or a plastic food container that has a mouth just big enough to comfortably slip your hand through, and which has a rolled over edge for a rim. Cut the rim off the cup about 1/2" down, being careful to not damage the rim. It may take several successive cuts, first with a knife to cut a larger piece off the cup, and then scissors cutting around and around until you have a plastic ring. Smooth up the bottom cut edge with some sandpaper.
     
    Now throw a tall cylinder, the top of which has an inside dimension that exactly fits the plastic cup rim ring. Slip the ring down into the cylinder and gently collar it tight onto the ring. Now you have a strong support to keep the rim of your cylinder perfectly circular while you belly it out into the moon jar form. Use your heat gun/torch/etc. or not as you wish. When the form is basically complete, gently lift the cup ring out of the cylinder, or if necessary, use a needle tool to cut just enough of the rim to remove the ring. Now finish the rim as desired.
  14. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Moon Jars - What Are The Rules To The Form?   
    I have attached the two moon jars I fired in my kiln this weekend. I tried to stay true to the white color. I like them both, although I need to get much better at throwing them. I like the ridge marks, which is something I usually dont like in my work. Anyways, I just wanted to finish the series of the jars I posted for people who were interested in the full journey. Thanks for all the hints and comments. I am going to keep making these. They are pretty enjoyable to make and require a lot of thought to throw well. 


  15. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Moon Jars - What Are The Rules To The Form?   
    Thanks oldlady. I enjoyed making them which made it even more rewarding. When I get some good ones glazed I'll update here.
     
    I might try using a blow dryer next time. I think I need to leave the bottom thicker and trim away some. I cut the last one I made in half and it was really even and I started thinking that I should probably leave more on the bottom and trim it round but not sure if that's right or wrong.
  16. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Moon Jars - What Are The Rules To The Form?   
    well i attempted moon jars tonight for the first time. these are the first three i have ever made. i made them with no tools to see how natural they would look. i am pretty happy with these. the third one has sand and grog(the biggest one). however when I took clay away from the bottom I warped the pot, still going to keep it though as I want to see how it holds up in the firing. 
     
    pretty happy with these. thanks for the kind thoughts and help everyone. 
     

  17. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Mark C. in Qotw: Is There A Genre Of Ceramics That You Hate?   
    For me its not hate its not like.
    The worst is pots usually mugs or tiles or whatever that are decorated with slogans or designs that look like a black sharpie did that.It could be cat drawing or dots or cute stuff or sayings whatever on a white background that you could do on a china import pot with a sharpie or magic marker -there are whole busineses pumping out this stuff.Makes my skin crawl.
  18. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Qotw: Is There A Genre Of Ceramics That You Hate?   
    I don't think there's a style of pottery that I don't think has a place in the world somewhere. That place may or may not be in MY house, however. I've been sifting through my brain, trying to think of an overall style I don't like as a whole category, and I can't, particularly. There always seems to be someone's work who is an exception. I even have some good friends that own a paint-your-own place, and I went with some family one afternoon, and decorated a travel mug. It felt weird to only be working on one piece, but it was good for entertainment, which I think is mostly the purpose of those places.
     
    I find overall, I dislike bad proportions, uncomfortable handles and a lack of attention to detail in finishing. If something is left crude or unfinished, I think it needs to be done as a conscious decision, not just as an accident or because the artist was careless or lazy. (Edit: think slab plates with rough edges and the canvas texture still left on.)
     
    And I think as a cousin to those face jugs, if one more person asks me if I can make them one of those yarn bowls where it's a face, and the yarn gets threaded out the nostril, I'm gonna scream! Grossgrossgrossgrossgross!!
  19. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Tyler Miller in Qotw: Is There A Genre Of Ceramics That You Hate?   
    I don't really count majolica, since it's an historic solution to a long time problem. And the coloured Japanese porcelains are what I'd consider well-executed. Coppers and cobalts in underglaze, then yellows, oranges, reds over. That's again a historic solution to getting colours on high fired ware. But if the blue, green, black or brown enamel pens come out, there's something wrong with how the piece was planned.
     
    There are always exceptions, but I see a trend of just firing a clear on white and drawing with enamel pens.
  20. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from D.M.Ernst in Qotw: Is There A Genre Of Ceramics That You Hate?   
    Several times in the past few years I have decided I "hated" a certain category of ceramics only to discover that I felt differently when I learned more about it or when I saw some better-made examples of it. 
     
    My first "hate" was wood-fired pottery because all I had ever seen was heavy clunky pieces made with little or no finesse and glazed in shades of orange and brown .... not my favorite color combination unless it has some other more vibrant color paired with it to lift it up. But now I have seen many examples of wood firing and some I have absolutely loved, so that opinion has completely changed as I learned more. 
     
    The one thing I really, really, truly hate, and I don't see this changing, is when people make UGLY THINGS. Now I understand when something is deliberately broken or ripped or made on a subject like death or decay that a person feels very strongly about and wishes to express in their art. I don't personally express myself in that way, and that kind of art is not my favorite, but there are some artists that do it very well, for example Beth Cavener. Her work is breathtakingly beautiful and meticulously made, even if the theme is often a bit dark for my taste. However it seems that some artists make ugly work in a push to be "edgy" and "unique" but it isn't even properly executed. I have no patience for that. 
     
    I also very much dislike trendy ceramics based on pop culture and other trends. How hard is it to base something on an incredibly popular and well-liked TV show, video game, song, or movie, and create an item that proves to be a popular seller? Yeah, I could do that anytime I wanted, too. It really frustrates me and I won't have anything to do with it, not just because of licensing issues but because I want to express myself, not some graphic artist or screenwriter in Hollywood. 
  21. Like
    GiselleNo5 got a reaction from Pres in Qotw: Is There A Genre Of Ceramics That You Hate?   
    Several times in the past few years I have decided I "hated" a certain category of ceramics only to discover that I felt differently when I learned more about it or when I saw some better-made examples of it. 
     
    My first "hate" was wood-fired pottery because all I had ever seen was heavy clunky pieces made with little or no finesse and glazed in shades of orange and brown .... not my favorite color combination unless it has some other more vibrant color paired with it to lift it up. But now I have seen many examples of wood firing and some I have absolutely loved, so that opinion has completely changed as I learned more. 
     
    The one thing I really, really, truly hate, and I don't see this changing, is when people make UGLY THINGS. Now I understand when something is deliberately broken or ripped or made on a subject like death or decay that a person feels very strongly about and wishes to express in their art. I don't personally express myself in that way, and that kind of art is not my favorite, but there are some artists that do it very well, for example Beth Cavener. Her work is breathtakingly beautiful and meticulously made, even if the theme is often a bit dark for my taste. However it seems that some artists make ugly work in a push to be "edgy" and "unique" but it isn't even properly executed. I have no patience for that. 
     
    I also very much dislike trendy ceramics based on pop culture and other trends. How hard is it to base something on an incredibly popular and well-liked TV show, video game, song, or movie, and create an item that proves to be a popular seller? Yeah, I could do that anytime I wanted, too. It really frustrates me and I won't have anything to do with it, not just because of licensing issues but because I want to express myself, not some graphic artist or screenwriter in Hollywood. 
  22. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Pres in Qotw: Is There A Genre Of Ceramics That You Hate?   
    Yappy student wrote in the Question pool: Is there a genre of ceramics that you hate?  Hopefully no one will get offended. You'll notice I didn't give an opinion.
     
     
    Wow! Do any of us admit to being a Ceramics bigot?     This is an interesting question for me, and I will have to admit that over the years. . . .I have been one. I think my first target for this form of bigotry was cast ceramics. My parent used to do it, and I thought that they had so much fun, and did some neat pieces, but I would never have thought of these things as art or sell-able. I got particularly peeved when doing Christmas craft shows when the cast Ceramic trees were all the rage, and my wheel thrown mugs, bowls, pitchers and teapots were so beige and blue and green in contrast to all the bright colors of the low fire cast ware. I came to realization though later on that some things could not be done efficiently with any other means other than . . . Yuch. . . casting! So my bigotry has become enlightened with the exposure to good cast ware and increased knowledge and understanding. That has not been the only target for my distaste over the years as I have aimed my dislike at Wood fired pottery and Raku, and at Earthenware pottery. All of these have come from a variety of different reasons, like a bad experience with raku, seeing overly heavy and poorly formed wood fired pottery, and having to throw a clay body that was high in talc with glazes from the 50s and 60s that just weren't in my taste range. Over the years, I have found that if I do not like something ceramic, maybe it is because I don't understand it, or have only seen the poorer examples of it.
     
    In the long run my latest hatred is toward poorly crafted ceramic that is given excuse, because it is classified as art, and boy am I certain that I will hear about that one!
     
     
     
     
    best,
    Pres
  23. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to GEP in Stacking Pots Rim To Rim In Glaze Firing   
    I have seen how tweaking a design, a few millimeters here and a few millimeters there, will mean I can fit seven on a shelf instead of five. I have also seen how sometimes a good sellable design just isn't worth the amount of space it needs in the kiln. You will be forced to think about these things out of necessity, and you will gain from it.
  24. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to GEP in Stacking Pots Rim To Rim In Glaze Firing   
    I started with a 3cf kiln. I used it for about 2 years, then bought a bigger one. It can work for the time being. You'll be firing it a lot, that's all.
  25. Like
    GiselleNo5 reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Stacking Pots Rim To Rim In Glaze Firing   
    Thanks for all the comments and suggestions folks. I appreciate them. Just gonna keep doing what I'm doing!
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