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margerydi

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About margerydi

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  1. I signed up for the ClayFlicks membership - free trial then a month's paid subscription, but I've been trying to cancel now and have heard nothing back. Emailed & sent the form in from the webpage. I can't make a phone call as I'm in the UK. Has anyone else had problems with this? Any ideas? Otherwise I'm going to have to ask my bank to block further payments. Thanks!
  2. Thank you very much. So, this is my plan: one bucket for 'clean' slurry - pour in the slurry and scoop out water from the top as it settles, and at a certain point, reclaim the clay. Then two additional buckets, one lined with a thick plastic bag. At the end of each session, I can pour any dirty water into the lined bucket (from the other bucket, which I have filled with fresh water). The next session, I can scoop out the clean water from the top of the lined bucket and either re-use (a couple of times) or pour on the grass or flowers (not vegetables!) I think the water should be relatively clean, as the particles will have settled, so it's OK to do this in moderation. When my lined bucked is getting full of sediment, I can just tie it up and take it to the dump. As I'm not a commercial potter, I think it's ok to do this as it will only be a small amount.
  3. Hi again - just wanted to add that I have bought the treadle wheel, cleaned it up and painted it, and I love it! Takes a bit of getting used to, but now I love the slower pace and better control. Thank you very much for all the advice, which really helped my decision.
  4. Thank you - I think I will look into the bucket capture system. I do reclaim some of the clay - it's the table washings etc that I need to deal with - probably 50% dust and spiders webs so no good for recycling! I think if I get a drying tray as well as suggested by Mark C that could work, at least in the summer. I'll be careful not to put anything else down the drains!!
  5. Hi - I'm a hobby potter and work in my garage, which has no running water. Can anyone please help me with how I can get rid of clay and glaze slops without ruining my plumbing or garden. Ie, at the moment I pour a bucket of slops down the drain, or in a corner of my (small) garden, but long term this is not ideal and will probably block my drain! I've searched online but can only find quite complex methods. Is there a simple way to get rid of this waste? (I reclaim the clay - I'm talking about the water from washing down surfaces etc.) Thank you!
  6. Thank you everyone. I'm going out to look at the treadle wheel on Friday, and if it seems in good working condition I'm going to go for it. It is really interesting seeing everyone's different experiences, and I think there are enough positive comments for me to take a chance on it. Although I only do ceramics as a hobby, I'd be heartbroken not to be able to throw any more.
  7. Thanks! (And no offence every taken!) I'm in the UK, so this might mean the availability of electric versus manual wheels is different. The electric wheel I have is an Alsager, about 20 years old. I bought it second hand off a mad old woman, but it was quite expensive (for me, anyway). I've been told the problem is the alternator, and although I think someone who knows something about mechanics and electrics could probably just strip out the insides and rewire it, that's not something I could even begin to manage to do. I've asked everyone I can think of (pottery wheel repair people / washing maching repair people etc) and no one will help. Occasionally it works - long enough for me to make a batch of pots, only for it to go haywire again before I can turn them. The idea of a treadle wheel appeals because I think there's not much that can go wrong with it. It's interesting that some people have been positive about using them. Although I can buy one quite cheaply it'll cost a fair bit to transport it, and I don't want to make another expensive mistake.
  8. Thanks Marcia - I've tried all the avenues with my electric wheel, but because it's old and complicated I can only get if fixed by shipping it to a specialist repair shop, which will cost a fortune before he even finds out if it's fixable!! I was drawn to the idea of a treadle wheel because there is less to go wrong. I wonder if you can sit on a stool to use them? Have you used one yourself? Thanks!
  9. Does anyone have experience of using a treadle wheel? Is it much harder than an electric wheel, especially for someone without that much experience? I am a hobby potter, and my electric wheel (bought used) has died. I can't afford to replace it, and no-one seems to know how to fix it, but someone is selling an old treadle wheel locally. Would I get the hang of it quite quickly, or would it be quite a challenge? Thank you!
  10. Hi Neil - thanks for the reply. I have tried this, but the manufacturer said it was so old that they didn't have a user manual - I can't find the maker of the inverter so I'm stuck!
  11. I've just bought a second hand Alsager wheel (about 20 years old) and it has a 'KLC' 'S Vector' inverter. I think I need to re-programme the inverter, as the wheel spins really fast with very little pressure (fine for centering, but not much else!), and also it goes reverse in the forward switch, and forward in the reverse switch! (It was fine when I bought it, but I think it got knocked on the journey home). I'm a hobby potter (this is my first, much longed-for wheel!) but I can't find any instructions or guides on how to programme and set an inverter for a potters wheel. It's not at all intuitive, and I've pressed various buttons and made it worse. I'd be really grateful for any advice or suggestions. Thank you! Margery
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