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tb001

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  1. Like
    tb001 got a reaction from High Bridge Pottery in Ian Currie Test Tiles Forums?   
    I've been reading through this thread and love some of the results you're getting! I had planned on doing something similar to the mat you've developed, though more for testing colorant blends vs glaze ingredients. 
    The idea of having some sort of vertical test in a grid is really intriguing.  If you had the spacing worked out correctly, using something like 12 or 24 well plates to mix glazes and dip the tiles might work. Amazon and eBay sell lots of what's meant to be disposable lab equipment that can end up being pretty cheap if you reuse. It's often used for doing medium thruput work where you're looking at a lot of variables, so perfect for this sort of application.
    Also in agreement w glazenerd on some sort of g/in^2 or specific gravity surrogate.
    I finally have my studio finished and kiln hooked up and excited to get started glaze testing again, though will likely be a while as we're due with our second child in a few weeks. I find the glaze testing one of the most rewarding aspects of  ceramics--so many variables in terms of clay and firing cycles alone! It definitely appeals to the former scientist in me!
     
     
     
  2. Like
    tb001 reacted to Pres in Portable Slab Roller Purchase   
    Brent rollers with the cables had to be taken care of meticulously, heavy spray greasing every Summer and monthly checking/adjusting  of the cables for tension. Love them or hate them, they worked well, but were problematic.
     
     
    best,
    Pres
  3. Like
    tb001 got a reaction from LeeU in Qotw: Are Our Expectations Too High?   
    I think there's a special component to clay that makes it feel more attainable. We all played with play dough when we were young. The lucky ones had art classes in school that included a clay session. The average person has likely made an ashtray (dating myself) or a spoon rest or the like. What you didn't know is the careful curation of glazes your teacher went through, or the fact that just the right clay for hand building was selected for you. Add to this the proliferation of the paint your own pottery places, the tendency of many to view clay as a 'craft' a la polymer clay from Michaels and the abundance of super cheap ceramic goods, it's easy to see why people underestimate the skills necessary.
     
    Personally, the depth of knowledge needed is one of the reasons clay has kept me so fascinated for so long. There's always a new direction I can explore, a different technique I could learn.
  4. Like
    tb001 got a reaction from GiselleNo5 in Qotw: Are Our Expectations Too High?   
    I think there's a special component to clay that makes it feel more attainable. We all played with play dough when we were young. The lucky ones had art classes in school that included a clay session. The average person has likely made an ashtray (dating myself) or a spoon rest or the like. What you didn't know is the careful curation of glazes your teacher went through, or the fact that just the right clay for hand building was selected for you. Add to this the proliferation of the paint your own pottery places, the tendency of many to view clay as a 'craft' a la polymer clay from Michaels and the abundance of super cheap ceramic goods, it's easy to see why people underestimate the skills necessary.
     
    Personally, the depth of knowledge needed is one of the reasons clay has kept me so fascinated for so long. There's always a new direction I can explore, a different technique I could learn.
  5. Like
    tb001 reacted to neilestrick in Stock Solutions For Glaze Testing   
    Thank you for the explanation. The problem is that most glaze colorants, being metallic oxides, don't stay suspended very well at all. You could, I suppose, mix them up in a gum solution, but that just adds more steps and probably negates the benefits.
     
    When doing line blends, you can do them as liquid volume measurements rather than weighing out each little portion. You just have to mix each end of the blend to the same volume and go from there. I think that would be similar to what you're describing.
  6. Like
    tb001 reacted to JohnnyK in Wiring For Kiln   
    I agree with Dick. Change the last 30 feet to #4 with the splice in a proper junction box with proper sized wire nuts and you should be good to go.
  7. Like
    tb001 got a reaction from nancylee in Need To Step Up Production   
    Agree with the others--plumbing isn't difficult at all. Just takes some persistence and, if you're like me, lots of trips to the hardware store for yet another size fitting. Depending on where you live, a hose can be a good interim step to get you started. I've run one of our sprinkler lines to a faucet near the studio, then ran a short stretch of hose into the studio and attached to a sink. When I'm in the studio I can turn on the faucet and then turn on the sprinkle zone and have water. Lots of creative solutions that are pretty easy to implement, even if they're just temporary.
  8. Like
    tb001 reacted to neilestrick in Need To Step Up Production   
    I have something similar to THIS in my studio and it works great. Just hook it up with flexible water lines and plug it in.
  9. Like
    tb001 reacted to nancylee in Need To Step Up Production   
    I think I'm still getting my mind around that I may be able to actually make a living at this if I push a bit more. It's very exciting, but all unexpected. And thanks for the encouragement about the plumbing - I have never done carpentry or plumbing, but why couldn't i?
  10. Like
    tb001 reacted to Robin B-T in Do You Eat Off Your Own Pots Everyday ?   
    A resounding yes. I have been using my own dishes for about 10 years. I have been a potter for about 15. My dinner plates though glazed the same are all different, my first attempts at making large plates in a set. I have my favorites in this group, but I love them all for their quirkiness. Over the years I have made sets of other sized dishes, I hardly use anything mass produced. I have a collection of mugs from other potters.
  11. Like
    tb001 reacted to bciskepottery in Pugmills--Sizing/porcelain Questions   
    https://www.baileypottery.com/pugmills-mixers/pugmills.htm
     
    Bailey has some good info on the Bluebirds. The 800 is suggested for those using 4 to 6 tons of clay per year. Sounds like a beast. But, if you are not using that volume, it will be underused. If you have to wait and wait to get enough clay to run through the pugger (and buy fresh clay until you accumulate enough scrap for recycling), then it doesn't make sense to buy bigger than you actually need. They seem to last forever, which may be why you don't see them coming up for sale very often. And, it will depreciate in value as it gets older -- especially if underused; so buying to sell in the future seems iffy. Stainless is nice for porcelain, but not required. There are issues with porcelain pitting the insides of puggers.
  12. Like
    tb001 reacted to Denice in Water Recycle In Dry Studio   
    Multiple buckets is a great idea, you can just throw out the clay water and dry out the glaze water and recycle it.   Denice
  13. Like
    tb001 got a reaction from ruddhess in Discussion On Clay   
    The way I've approached this (another newbie) is to find a clay body (or two) I like to work with and that suits my needs. What that meant for me is a nice throwing, not too groggy, cone 5-6 white stoneware and a more finicky cone 5-6 porcelain that can be thrown thin and be a bit translucent.
     
    I love the look of porcelain, so am sticking to white clay bodies. Then vitrification temperature was my next criteria. From there it's all about the throwing and clay properties. Avoiding clays which people have said had issues with glaze fit--just looked for good basic clay people seem to be happy with. Then I think about goaze testing/finding nice glazes which play well with my firing temps and clay bodies.
  14. Like
    tb001 got a reaction from clay lover in Humor: The Best Way To Learn!   
    I wonder if it's not the throwing, but the response of the instructor that rubs people the wrong way?
     
    As a beginner, those days at the wheel are quite familiar to me, and I had to relearn the lessons all over again when I switched to a not very forgiving porcelain. I'm sure when I'm finally able to get my studio finished and dig out my wheel again, I'll be back in the same boat. I've taken two beginning classes at a local studio and spent a ton of time laughing at myself and with other students about our efforts--and the video didn't even show a hunk of clay going flying off the wheel! So while the beginner efforts brought a smile to my face as I remembered those days, the instructor response just made me cringe. Thankful I had an instructor who seemed to enjoy our mistakes as much as our successes!
  15. Like
    tb001 reacted to firenflux in I'll Never Be A Real Potter.   
    I have a decent supply of chemicals I never use because it's just easier to buy the pre made stuff. I barely have time as it is to make new stuff without fussing with making my own glazes. Maybe someday I will again. I still have 4 buckets I made a few years ago I'm still using because I don't like them all that much. Instead I have a commercial glaze buying obsession to rival most girls shoe obsessions. I have over 40 different colors. I don't use a lot of them though.
  16. Like
    tb001 reacted to oldlady in Creating A Ice White Porcelain Clay Body   
    big lou, look at the website for the kind of work antoinette does.  it should blow you away.
     
     
    antoinette, i have two boxes of frost and want to make things that are not carved but with various thicknesses added and stamped.  i have not found a recipe for a glaze that will work on frost.  have only heard about it being tricky to glaze.  did you find that to be true?  i want a white matte that only adds a more easily washable skin, not something for functional ware.
  17. Like
    tb001 reacted to Dale pots in Studio With No Main Water Or Mains Drainage....ideas ..can It Be Done ?   
    If your garage has an outside wall you can work with that. If you don't want to bucket water in you can pipe it in or use a garden hose, but don't leave the hose on under pressure unattended. For a drain with or without a sink you can use a 3 bucket drain system attached to each other as settling for clay slop and get a small sump pump for the clean water bucket that has a float switch on it so it turns on and off by itself. It has a garden hose connection on it that will pump uphill even for those of you in a basement. The bigger the pump the better it will pump uphill so consider that when you buy one.
    Dale          
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