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Crusty

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  1. Like
    Crusty reacted to Bill Kielb in Kiln shed   
    @Crusty @Mark C.
    Just a quick note on Hardie board (Just started designing a space for a community so I looked up its ratings and allowables) it’s great but it is not fire rated so Type X Drywall would be superior in instances  for fire protection and code rated walls.
    A great product IMO but to be fire rated it needs to go over regular rated drywall. I mention this because fire rated assemblies protect the wood framing from heating up, drying excessively and catching fire especially a ceiling cavity with wood framing in it.  Wood products catch fire in the 450 - 500  degree range  after a few hours and generally instantly at 700 degrees.  So for walls and ceilings already protected by rated drywall, hardy board  installed over  the top of  of the completed fire rated assembly should be fine.
    What is often overlooked is  that the top of the kiln will radiate infrared energy which will heat up the ceiling that it is looking at. So in addition to the convection (Heat rises), the ceiling will warm above the kiln by radiation  often significantly. Hardi board will absorb and conduct this heat to what it is attached to which is why it is not fire rated.  A simple piece of reflective sheet metal  mounted to the ceiling above the kiln will easily radiate it away though so this problem is easy to solve or safeguard against.
    Just some  safety first ideas for interior structures, figured I would let everyone know. To be compliant I needed to scrap the hardy board in my community center  design.
     

  2. Like
    Crusty reacted to Bill Kielb in Getting reduction at top of gas kiln   
    I watched the video and still have no idea of your reduction methodology. My questions would center around  what is your planned reduction schedule? Are you doing a body reduction, how strong and for how long? Since you are going to cone 7/ 8 I don’t see any reason to come out of reduction or at least slight reduction  through completion.
     
    In your next video it would be helpful to see the reducing flame and see the port plug flames.  Without a gauge downstream from the metering valve it would be helpful to have a sense of pressure adjustments and some way to say how much gas is being used..  Half shelves and offsets are probably a great idea although  later in the firing no matter how turbulent you believe it is, most of the heating is by infrared radiation so allowing wares to see each other contributes to more uniform heating. Lots of interesting things to explore for sure. I would also suggest you mix up some celosia red and start firing with test tiles in various locations to give you an indication of reduction strength and consistency throughout.
  3. Like
    Crusty reacted to neilestrick in Electric to Gas conversion kiln   
    Do a lot of searches here on the forum and you'll find a lot of information about how to make that type of kiln work. The main issue is that there's not enough space inside for the kiln to breathe. I recommend using 15" shelves rather than the 20" shelves that you would use as an electric.
  4. Like
    Crusty reacted to Mark C. in Electric to Gas conversion kiln   
    The reason kilns are heated from the floors  in downdrafts are the heat goes up and is pullled down thru the wares to the exit flue . It really the best way as you get the to use the heat twice sort of speak. 
    Since this is your 1st kiln you will learn a lot and make lots of mistakes-like learning to drive (use an old car)
    just expect it to be wildly uneven in temps. Trying to reinvent the wheel may also not help.
    I constructed a down draft salt kiln two years ago  at a workshop and posted photos here. That was a coffin larger electric . I had 4 burners on the floor and made the downdraft flue inside the rear of chamber-(the stack ran thru the lid which came off to load and unload) worked ok but salt eats everything up fast.
    The biggest issue is these kilns are super small and as you noted space is needed for the combustion and exit flue 
  5. Like
    Crusty reacted to neilestrick in Kiln heating slow   
    At 1000F the load shouldn't be affecting the firing. At the high end, yes, but it can handle anything at 1000F. It's always a good idea to disperse the load throughout the kiln as evenly as possible, though, so you don't get cold spots.
  6. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from Hulk in Skutt Model A Wheel Used   
    lol funny, we got the Clay Boss and 2 weeks later picked up a brand spankin new J-230 18x27 L&L manual kiln still wrapped up and on the pallet with kiln shelf kit . Plus a used Shimpo Velocity that was and still is in good shape for $300.00 ..  you talk about 2 happy potters doing a little dance ...
  7. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from oldlady in Sodium Silicate   
    still playing around.  My order did not get on the transfer today,  kind of bummed about that.. not to mention they sold me stuff that was out of stock.. I did use a Underglaze over the SS , Black on White looks pretty good.. I used the torch to dry the SS and UG .. i used slip on the inside of the pot and when it started to tighten up i added water with a sponge.. it was pretty firm but it did move, i cant believe how thin you can get with this stuff...

  8. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from oldlady in Sodium Silicate   
    I like making mugs,vases in the 2 to 3 lb range and large bowls.  i make some other things to but mostly those 3..

  9. Like
    Crusty reacted to Min in Sodium Silicate   
    Generally speaking using a thin layer of sodium silicate and/or not drying it out too much will give a finer pattern. Put it on heavily and really dry it out so it looks like a candy shell and you'll get thicker cracks. For putting it right in the slip try about 1TBS sodium silicate in about 1/4 cup of slip. Again, thinner/wetter will get you a more delicate pattern. If you use really thick slip and glop it on there thickly (like frosting) you can get really deep cracking like tree bark. 
  10. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from Chilly in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    White Oak, Maple, Blue Beech aka Ironwood,Ash...  if i were to fire a wood kiln those woods would be used..  all are tight grain, low sap, long burning and you will use less of those woods compared to any soft wood.. soft woods like pine will darken your pots due to the high sap content.. the soot produced by pine is the nastiest and hardest to clean off of a glass door..  i scrubbed my grand parents for hours trying to get it off, last time they ever burnt Pine..  so no matter what stage your in its going to stick to your pots,its in the air as it burns... i think i would want the air as clean as possible..
  11. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from Rae Reich in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    mine is a yellow green color..  seems to be working just fine..   went slow to 250 then did a hold at 975 ..  it's at 1455 now.
  12. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from Rae Reich in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    yes , pressure washer , all kinds of chemicals and a scrubby on a broom stick... took for ever, gotta do what ya gotta do LOL
  13. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from Rae Reich in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    White Oak, Maple, Blue Beech aka Ironwood,Ash...  if i were to fire a wood kiln those woods would be used..  all are tight grain, low sap, long burning and you will use less of those woods compared to any soft wood.. soft woods like pine will darken your pots due to the high sap content.. the soot produced by pine is the nastiest and hardest to clean off of a glass door..  i scrubbed my grand parents for hours trying to get it off, last time they ever burnt Pine..  so no matter what stage your in its going to stick to your pots,its in the air as it burns... i think i would want the air as clean as possible..
  14. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from Rae Reich in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    got the new elements in today.. the old ones literally fell apart in my hands..  the kiln is a 2002 and we got it in 2014 and it was new in the wrap still on the skid. no kiln wash on the shelves and came with a Shimpo wheel... gotta love Craigslist
  15. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from Rae Reich in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    Thats nice. i guess we been taking it to easy to slow .. ill get the new elements in saturday or sunday and try a bisque on monday..  im still going slow until 250 F though.. dont need to lose any pots LOL...
  16. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from liambesaw in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    mine is a yellow green color..  seems to be working just fine..   went slow to 250 then did a hold at 975 ..  it's at 1455 now.
  17. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from liambesaw in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    i finally got the kiln back up and going.. did a break in on the coils and shes ready for tomorrows bisque.. installed the Pyrometer and made sure it was working properly.. the only thing i do not like about it is, it shuts itself off after about 10 minutes and i have to turn it back on ...
  18. Like
    Crusty reacted to neilestrick in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    At the high temps of wood kilns soot/creosote is not an issue. It all burns away, no matter how much sap is in the wood. You will see differences in the color of the ash from wood to wood, but dark or light would be more from what type of kiln you have and how you fire it- how much air flow you have. When I was wood firing in grad school we only used softwoods, because that's what we had available to us out west. Lots of pine, and even willow (which is a bear to split, and very difficult to get much heat from).
  19. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from liambesaw in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    Next Question=== > Where is the best place to mount my Pyrometer? its a 3 section kiln, in the middle section?
  20. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    thanks , I was at work and it was a crazy day..  I saved both schedules..  I also purchased a pyrometer to help us out ..  it gets old looking into the kiln to see the black spots LOL.  
  21. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from Min in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    yes. 
  22. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from liambesaw in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    Simon Leach swears by a cooler air temp after a glaze firing. he says it makes his colors pop more.  I get in the 60s in my basement. hes in a garage, could be even cooler..
  23. Like
    Crusty got a reaction from liambesaw in Gas VS Electric Kiln   
    Thats nice. i guess we been taking it to easy to slow .. ill get the new elements in saturday or sunday and try a bisque on monday..  im still going slow until 250 F though.. dont need to lose any pots LOL...
  24. Like
    Crusty reacted to Min in Greek Key style   
    If your customer would go for a slab built rather than a thrown pot then the smaller patterns could be easily done with wood rollers like these: https://mkmpotterytools.com/product/rm-001-medium-handle-roller-square-spiral/ and https://mkmpotterytools.com/product/mrl-09-mini-roller-1-cm-right-slanted-lines/. The larger design could be drawn to get the spacing right then use a straight edge in one hand and a small loop tool in the other to carve them out. You can use the wood roulette wheels on thrown pots but they tend to distort the pot a bit, depending on the thickness of the walls and getting the timing right it might be doable. If you can still get one hand inside the pot to support the area getting stamped that would help.
  25. Like
    Crusty reacted to Denice in Greek Key style   
    You would have days,  maybe weeks  in learning a new technique like this,  unless you are wanting to delve into this area of design  I would decline.   Denice
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