Jump to content

Callie Beller Diesel

Moderators
  • Content Count

    2,066
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from Hulk in Only glazing half of mug, susceptible to stains/moisture?   
    @liambesaw @Benzine I've found that if you apply Sherril's Scarlet Kidney of Shining to the projected exposed parts at leather hard, sponges gain a +5 resistance to shredding damage. Your gaming table still will still likely appreciate a coaster.
    For those non-Dungeons and Dragons players, burnish the exposed part with a little red rib to smooth it out if you're worried about causing damage to sponges or tabletops. Work clean to keep the feet clear of burrs and crumbs, and give your pots a quick pass with some 220 grit wet/dry sandpaper, used wet, after the glaze firing.
    My clay is fired to around 1% porosity or less, so I have no trouble leaving exposed clay on the bottom 1/4 to 1/3 of the pot. I haven't tried to test where the line is when a mug will break more readily if too much is left unglazed. I know if it's only lined, it's a lot more fragile.

  2. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from Benzine in Only glazing half of mug, susceptible to stains/moisture?   
    @liambesaw @Benzine I've found that if you apply Sherril's Scarlet Kidney of Shining to the projected exposed parts at leather hard, sponges gain a +5 resistance to shredding damage. Your gaming table still will still likely appreciate a coaster.
    For those non-Dungeons and Dragons players, burnish the exposed part with a little red rib to smooth it out if you're worried about causing damage to sponges or tabletops. Work clean to keep the feet clear of burrs and crumbs, and give your pots a quick pass with some 220 grit wet/dry sandpaper, used wet, after the glaze firing.
    My clay is fired to around 1% porosity or less, so I have no trouble leaving exposed clay on the bottom 1/4 to 1/3 of the pot. I haven't tried to test where the line is when a mug will break more readily if too much is left unglazed. I know if it's only lined, it's a lot more fragile.

  3. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel reacted to liambesaw in What’s on your workbench?   
    I have been glazing and firing bowls all weekend, no surprise. 
    But today I am making a few carafes for a company on the east coast to see if they'd like to do business with me.  Just a little commission gig to get some money flowing.  Supposedly 20 a month at 40 a piece, that's at least enough spending cash to buy more clay and feed my real addiction lol.  
  4. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel reacted to Chilly in Mark:Selling pendants online in retirement   
    From a buyer point of view, I don't understand Etsy.  I can never find what I'm looking for, even when I know it's there.  Searching is hopeless. (I nearly said the seaching feature, but there is no feature).  I haven't found out how to filter or sort.  I don't think eBay or Amazon are the place to buy hand-made stuff, but at least as buying "places" they do have search features.
     
  5. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from Rae Reich in Only glazing half of mug, susceptible to stains/moisture?   
    @liambesaw @Benzine I've found that if you apply Sherril's Scarlet Kidney of Shining to the projected exposed parts at leather hard, sponges gain a +5 resistance to shredding damage. Your gaming table still will still likely appreciate a coaster.
    For those non-Dungeons and Dragons players, burnish the exposed part with a little red rib to smooth it out if you're worried about causing damage to sponges or tabletops. Work clean to keep the feet clear of burrs and crumbs, and give your pots a quick pass with some 220 grit wet/dry sandpaper, used wet, after the glaze firing.
    My clay is fired to around 1% porosity or less, so I have no trouble leaving exposed clay on the bottom 1/4 to 1/3 of the pot. I haven't tried to test where the line is when a mug will break more readily if too much is left unglazed. I know if it's only lined, it's a lot more fragile.

  6. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from Roberta12 in Group Sale - software for sales   
    If you're using Square, use it as the till system it is. Enter each artist's items, and enter their name under the "category" section. Then you can look up sales by category over your preferred time frame from the dashboard, and you can tell at a glance who sold what. It's a bit of data entry to get it set up, but it makes it way easier in the end. Someone familiar with Square should be able to set something like that up in an afternoon.
    Edited to add:
    We used this exact setup when we were working with about 60 different artists at a small one week show. The accounting at the end was very straightforward.
    added again: the only other software I have used myself would be designed for consignment situations, and it's more suitable for a permanent setup due to the initial software purchase and a bit of a steeper learning curve because it's got more functions you can get confused by.
  7. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from liambesaw in Only glazing half of mug, susceptible to stains/moisture?   
    @liambesaw @Benzine I've found that if you apply Sherril's Scarlet Kidney of Shining to the projected exposed parts at leather hard, sponges gain a +5 resistance to shredding damage. Your gaming table still will still likely appreciate a coaster.
    For those non-Dungeons and Dragons players, burnish the exposed part with a little red rib to smooth it out if you're worried about causing damage to sponges or tabletops. Work clean to keep the feet clear of burrs and crumbs, and give your pots a quick pass with some 220 grit wet/dry sandpaper, used wet, after the glaze firing.
    My clay is fired to around 1% porosity or less, so I have no trouble leaving exposed clay on the bottom 1/4 to 1/3 of the pot. I haven't tried to test where the line is when a mug will break more readily if too much is left unglazed. I know if it's only lined, it's a lot more fragile.

  8. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from LeeU in Group Sale - software for sales   
    If you're using Square, use it as the till system it is. Enter each artist's items, and enter their name under the "category" section. Then you can look up sales by category over your preferred time frame from the dashboard, and you can tell at a glance who sold what. It's a bit of data entry to get it set up, but it makes it way easier in the end. Someone familiar with Square should be able to set something like that up in an afternoon.
    Edited to add:
    We used this exact setup when we were working with about 60 different artists at a small one week show. The accounting at the end was very straightforward.
    added again: the only other software I have used myself would be designed for consignment situations, and it's more suitable for a permanent setup due to the initial software purchase and a bit of a steeper learning curve because it's got more functions you can get confused by.
  9. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from Hulk in Mark:Selling pendants online in retirement   
    So this talk from NCECA this spring, which I unfortunately missed in person, is now up on YouTube. The speaker worked at Etsy for a number of years, and is a former Etsy seller herself, and she gives a good insider breakdown of the strengths and weaknesses of Etsy. It's a 45 minute video, but you can listen to it hands free while you work.
     
  10. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from LeeU in Mark:Selling pendants online in retirement   
    So this talk from NCECA this spring, which I unfortunately missed in person, is now up on YouTube. The speaker worked at Etsy for a number of years, and is a former Etsy seller herself, and she gives a good insider breakdown of the strengths and weaknesses of Etsy. It's a 45 minute video, but you can listen to it hands free while you work.
     
  11. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from Min in Group Sale - software for sales   
    @Min Square does sell a barcode reader it integrates with. It runs about $150 online, shipping time 5-7 days. I believe you need the stand and an Ipad as well, for another $200 for the stand and whatever the ipad runs for if you don't already own one. Barcode generation software is easy to come by, and I did find some of that for free. So not exorbitant, as far as till systems go, but it depends on wether it will be used again, or for how much volume as to wether or not something like that is cost effective.
  12. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel reacted to Stephen in Mark:Selling pendants online in retirement   
    Ya know while it is possible to drive generic traffic to sites I think really most potters that sell much through their websites probably are out in front of customers all the time and the website becomes an extension. In the old days repeat customers would pick up the phone but these days drop by the site. Facebook pushes of kiln openings and new pots. Show customers picking up cards. They know the potter and the pottery already. 
  13. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from Min in Group Sale - software for sales   
    If you're using Square, use it as the till system it is. Enter each artist's items, and enter their name under the "category" section. Then you can look up sales by category over your preferred time frame from the dashboard, and you can tell at a glance who sold what. It's a bit of data entry to get it set up, but it makes it way easier in the end. Someone familiar with Square should be able to set something like that up in an afternoon.
    Edited to add:
    We used this exact setup when we were working with about 60 different artists at a small one week show. The accounting at the end was very straightforward.
    added again: the only other software I have used myself would be designed for consignment situations, and it's more suitable for a permanent setup due to the initial software purchase and a bit of a steeper learning curve because it's got more functions you can get confused by.
  14. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from Benzine in Wax resist/ water etching, and signatures   
    +1 for soaping the brush before using wax resist. Dampen the brush and work some dish soap or hand soap  thoroughly into the bristles, right down to the ferrule. Try not to get it too wet or bubbly, or it's hard to point the brush. Even the crusty gross wax resist rinses nicely. I've  been using the same artificial sable brush for wax and other things for about 8 years now.
  15. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel reacted to Babs in Wax resist/ water etching, and signatures   
    Load your brush with dish washing liquid...thick stuff before dipping in the wax resist. Washes out easily.
  16. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel reacted to Stephen in Mark:Selling pendants online in retirement   
    Ya know that might be right on but then you are driving your customers to a large platform with lots and lots of cheap imported machine alternatives to what you sell. I can't really wrap my head around that being a good thing to do. I did set up a store last year one rainy Sunday with bank accounts and such and a few products loaded and a link from my site to it but having trouble getting motivated to load more. Everyone seems to talk about a perceived value  of having a store there but no one these days seems to ever talk about making any money from it.  Lee if you're wondering it really is just a few hours or less process to get it all setup. Since you sell on your regular site you can just use the same pictures and blurps. They do charge though per product so to have 40-50 items up is like paying for another website.
    edit: when I say no one and everybody I am talking about potters. I get that a bunch of people make money on etsy.
  17. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel reacted to Min in Rough glaze   
    @Callie Beller Diesel, don't know if you want to try it but I think you could use Ferro 3292(-2) to supply the strontium and forget the barium part of the formula. The barium makes up 0.01 of the formula, it wouldn't be missed I don't think. The Ferro 3292 is available at Tuckers in Ontario and isn't that expensive ($175 for a 50 lb bag). Your ceramic supply place gets Cone Art Kilns from them probably so they might be able to bring the frit in for you, dunno. I redid the recipe using Ferro 3292 (now called 3292-2), on paper it looks okay. Tiny bit of lithium now (0.01) but shouldn't be an issue. COE is the same, LOI is just a tiny bit higher, could get it back down using another frit to supply the lower boron in the 3292 but since the clay is so low in this recipe a bit of gerstley wouldn't hurt. Flux ratio is actually better (slightly) in the sub recipe.

  18. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Rough glaze   
    Honestly, as a clear glaze, this one is only okay. It can be cloudy, especially if over dark clay or black underglaze. I use it because I can get it premixed, which saves a lot of time for me, and it fits my chosen clay body quite well. It makes a better base glaze than a clear. 
    Tony does note that the premixed version available from Plainsman is made with coarser meshes of both Neph Sye and silica than the recipe's originator recommends. I looked into getting a bag of that F 524 frit to test it with the finer mesh of silica. Plainsman will sell you a 50 lb bag, but it was $$$.
  19. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel reacted to LeeU in Mark:Selling pendants online in retirement   
    I've been coming to this conclusion myself. For some bizarre reason, people will go to my website but seem uninterested in purchasing directly from the nicely done store. They will email me about something that is on there, which of course changes nothing except they've used more of their own time getting the same info & the same price & the same safe payment process.  They buy after emailing. 
    My own online store is as clean and clear and attractive as the Etsy format----go figure. Regardless, what most people I converse with ask  me is "Are you on Etsy?" I've neglected my web presence--word of mouth is working just fine for now, but I think next year I may go ahead and do an Etsy store just to see what happens when I answer that question with "Well, yes, yes I am." 
    On another note-I suggest taking advantage of SCORE's free workshops, webinars, and mentors. Enormously helpful. I also recommend experimenting with a free high-quality DIY web site generator like WIX  (or Weebly or Wordpress etc.) to create your own website --it's a great learning experience, which helps when you go to do a store on Etsy, plus you can showcase other things, like new work, a blog, or interesting aspects of your process. 
  20. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel reacted to liambesaw in Mark:Selling pendants online in retirement   
    I figure Etsy is a good place to drive sales to, not a place to get sales from.  Like if you don't have a web store for your stuff and people are interested in buying what you have, you can refer them to your Etsy.  But if you just put stuff on Etsy and wait, the chances of you making sales is slim.  
    So just another tool, don't expect Etsy to promote your items
  21. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from LeeU in Mark:Selling pendants online in retirement   
    Sound observation.
    Almost no one on Etsy in any category makes a full time living from that site, despite the "quit your day job" series of blog posts Etsy liked to promote at one point. Last I looked, the actual number doing that was only 2-3% of sellers.  Etsy is best used as one income stream amongst many as a part of a full time income, or as a modest side or part time income.
    Online sales results will depend largely on your own ability to understand and execute online promotion. There is no such thing as "set it and forget it." Anyone who says otherwise is likely trying to sell you a course.  
    And after sounding all negative and cynical like that, I have to also say that success needs to be defined by the individual. If you're earning a hundred dollars every once in a while to pay for more materials or firing fees and that's all you need, then great! If it's less overheard and stress to have a spring sale online than to pack up and travel out of town for four days at Easter for the same amount of profit, then do the online and save your sanity. Not everyone lives in an area with good in-person sales to hand, and they find their supportive community online instead. At that point, online sales make sense. Do you.
    We don't sprout instantly profitable businesses overnight, and online selling is a tool in the box to help  build. Like any tool though, it needs to be used properly to get the best results. 
     
     
     
     
  22. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel reacted to Min in Rough glaze   
    Thanks for providing more info @ronfire, that was really helpful. I agree with Neil, apply the u.g. to dry greenware then bisque fire it. BTW I think the clear glaze that Greenbarn sells for M340 is this one from Tony Hansen. 
    Ron, I looked up PSH underglazes and they do say to put them on bisque then glaze when dry so I'm wondering if they flux out a bit at typical bisque temps. Like everything ceramics I would suggest running a few test tiles before doing actual work.
  23. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel got a reaction from LeeU in What’s on your workbench?   
    Two down, 50 to go. 


  24. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel reacted to Hulk in Teapots cracking just above foot when filled with boiling water.   
    Hi Morris!
    ditto on pics, and approximate the thickness on both sides o'th' footring - if you trim rings, else both sides of the cracks - my guess would be the bottom is much thicker than the base of the wall? 
  25. Like
    Callie Beller Diesel reacted to GEP in The power of email   
    I've posted about this subject before, just want to share another quick story about how much more powerful email marketing is, compared to social media.
    The past two years, I have participated in an online show/sale of cups. Last year, I sent a blast email to my email subscribers about it, and I posted about it on facebook and instagram. My five mugs sold out in under 10 minutes.
    This year, I decided to skip the blast email, and just use social media. I was theorizing that my email subscribers prefer to go to my shows in person, and social media followers are more likely to not be local enough to do that. I only sold three mugs on the first day. Two days later, and person on instagram asked me for instructions on how to buy. Instagram does not allow hyperlinks, so I had to describe how to get to right website. Cumbersome, but it appeared to work, the fourth mug was sold that day.
    Two days later (yesterday), the fifth mug was still not sold. I posted on facebook about the last mug. I did not bother with instagram, because I could not link directly to the mug listing on instagram. Nothing happened. 
    Three days later (today), it was still not sold. I had scheduled a blast email about a show coming up this weekend. So I edited the email this morning to mention the last unsold mug. It was sold 30 minutes after the email went out.
    Just remember your email subscribers are far more interested in your work than anyone who follows you on social media. Next year, if I do this cup show again, I will not skip the blast email!
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.