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LeeU

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  1. Like
    LeeU reacted to neilestrick in Wax resist/ water etching, and signatures   
    The wax that Ceramic Supply Chicago sells will rinse out of brushes with just water. Awesome stuff.
  2. Like
    LeeU reacted to Hulk in Wax resist/ water etching, and signatures   
    Hi Rebekah,
    The type/brand of wax might matter - I'm using an emulsion type that Aardvark Clay sells. I have two brushes devoted to waxing. During a session, I'll put the brush in water between uses (so the wax doesn't congeal), and at conclusion of session, wash out with soap (Dawn or some other good grease cutter) and hot water. A toothbrush or small wire brush helps in the cleaning, and combing out the filaments as well. Reset the brush whilst wet so it's all straight for next time. There's some wax in the heel of the brushes - just about impossible to get all that out - hence I'm not using anything expensive for waxing.
  3. Like
    LeeU reacted to Stephen in New to the Business   
    Ya know you have two problems, process and business. I would look for slip casting classes. While pottery classes for folks working in ceramics is a good thing it sounds like this is a slip cast business so a pottery class may have very negligible value if you are planning to keep this business going as is and may well just get you all confused about it all. You are not trying to decide on the direction to go with pottery,  you want to know how to use the stuff you have. A generic pottery class would be fun and certainly dial you in on working with clay forms but slip casting is not the same thing and the class may not even cover it at all or just clip past it quickly and running electric kilns may also not be covered in any kind of depth. 
    If I were you I would go on an information blitz, watching every you tube video I could find on slip casting and order any books you can find on amazon. You already have all the equipment so using the that information you should be able to get going. Sometimes it is good to just go at it. If she has not fired those kilns in a very long time it might make sense to have a kiln person or at least an electrician check them out for safety before you start using them. 
    Has the business been running right up until now? I mean are clients expecting delivery of products or is just just a case where she had run this business in the past so all of the equipment is still there? You mentioned a Christmas tree mold but it's mid October so unless you are planning to man a booth at some Xmas shows Xmas buying by businesses I think is long over unless she has some orders already.
    Good luck!
  4. Like
    LeeU got a reaction from JohnnyK in Mark:Selling pendants online in retirement   
    I've been coming to this conclusion myself. For some bizarre reason, people will go to my website but seem uninterested in purchasing directly from the nicely done store. They will email me about something that is on there, which of course changes nothing except they've used more of their own time getting the same info & the same price & the same safe payment process.  They buy after emailing. 
    My own online store is as clean and clear and attractive as the Etsy format----go figure. Regardless, what most people I converse with ask  me is "Are you on Etsy?" I've neglected my web presence--word of mouth is working just fine for now, but I think next year I may go ahead and do an Etsy store just to see what happens when I answer that question with "Well, yes, yes I am." 
    On another note-I suggest taking advantage of SCORE's free workshops, webinars, and mentors. Enormously helpful. I also recommend experimenting with a free high-quality DIY web site generator like WIX  (or Weebly or Wordpress etc.) to create your own website --it's a great learning experience, which helps when you go to do a store on Etsy, plus you can showcase other things, like new work, a blog, or interesting aspects of your process. 
  5. Like
    LeeU got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Mark:Selling pendants online in retirement   
    I've been coming to this conclusion myself. For some bizarre reason, people will go to my website but seem uninterested in purchasing directly from the nicely done store. They will email me about something that is on there, which of course changes nothing except they've used more of their own time getting the same info & the same price & the same safe payment process.  They buy after emailing. 
    My own online store is as clean and clear and attractive as the Etsy format----go figure. Regardless, what most people I converse with ask  me is "Are you on Etsy?" I've neglected my web presence--word of mouth is working just fine for now, but I think next year I may go ahead and do an Etsy store just to see what happens when I answer that question with "Well, yes, yes I am." 
    On another note-I suggest taking advantage of SCORE's free workshops, webinars, and mentors. Enormously helpful. I also recommend experimenting with a free high-quality DIY web site generator like WIX  (or Weebly or Wordpress etc.) to create your own website --it's a great learning experience, which helps when you go to do a store on Etsy, plus you can showcase other things, like new work, a blog, or interesting aspects of your process. 
  6. Like
    LeeU reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Mark:Selling pendants online in retirement   
    Sound observation.
    Almost no one on Etsy in any category makes a full time living from that site, despite the "quit your day job" series of blog posts Etsy liked to promote at one point. Last I looked, the actual number doing that was only 2-3% of sellers.  Etsy is best used as one income stream amongst many as a part of a full time income, or as a modest side or part time income.
    Online sales results will depend largely on your own ability to understand and execute online promotion. There is no such thing as "set it and forget it." Anyone who says otherwise is likely trying to sell you a course.  
    And after sounding all negative and cynical like that, I have to also say that success needs to be defined by the individual. If you're earning a hundred dollars every once in a while to pay for more materials or firing fees and that's all you need, then great! If it's less overheard and stress to have a spring sale online than to pack up and travel out of town for four days at Easter for the same amount of profit, then do the online and save your sanity. Not everyone lives in an area with good in-person sales to hand, and they find their supportive community online instead. At that point, online sales make sense. Do you.
    We don't sprout instantly profitable businesses overnight, and online selling is a tool in the box to help  build. Like any tool though, it needs to be used properly to get the best results. 
     
     
     
     
  7. Like
    LeeU got a reaction from Babs in What’s on your workbench?   
    Oh---please try!! I can't conceptualize this and so much want to see whatever can be seen! 
  8. Like
    LeeU got a reaction from Rae Reich in What’s on your workbench?   
    Oh---please try!! I can't conceptualize this and so much want to see whatever can be seen! 
  9. Like
    LeeU got a reaction from Hulk in QotW: How do you prefer to organize your tools for your work areas?   
    Each of my work stations (for functions in the process) has its own array of most-used tools and assists placed as neatly near by as possible. I use little household bins to hold horizontals and jars for uprights, bowls/catchalls for sponges, hooks for hanging things, carefully chosen shelving, and planned use of spaces under tables. My clay is in 5 gal buckets set on those plant-moving things with wheels, I use carts with drawers to store smalls, labeled by category.  I label everything so I can remember what's what (i.e. this shelf is bisque for glazing, that shelf is greenware etc.). I write the type of clay and cone, and type of glaze and cone, on masking tape and put that where I can see it at a glance. I try to put like items together-by size or type or function.  
    I have such a small space and I don't tolerate mess very well, especially my own, that I just have to keep it functional or I get put off and back out when I need to press ahead. It's kind of a mental containment strategy, to keep my studio so that I can walk in and just get to work and have what I need at hand without having to search for things  or clean them off first. 
  10. Like
    LeeU got a reaction from Hulk in What’s on your workbench?   
    Oh---please try!! I can't conceptualize this and so much want to see whatever can be seen! 
  11. Like
    LeeU reacted to liambesaw in What’s on your workbench?   
    Much like @Callie Beller Diesel, I have a full plate tonight.  In celebration of my youtube channel reaching 100 subscribers I decided it was a good idea to throw 100 bowls.  Now that they're all drying at a rapid rate, I'm having second thoughts on how great of an idea it was! Haha
     


  12. Like
    LeeU reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in What’s on your workbench?   
    Two down, 50 to go. 


  13. Like
    LeeU reacted to GEP in The power of email   
    I've posted about this subject before, just want to share another quick story about how much more powerful email marketing is, compared to social media.
    The past two years, I have participated in an online show/sale of cups. Last year, I sent a blast email to my email subscribers about it, and I posted about it on facebook and instagram. My five mugs sold out in under 10 minutes.
    This year, I decided to skip the blast email, and just use social media. I was theorizing that my email subscribers prefer to go to my shows in person, and social media followers are more likely to not be local enough to do that. I only sold three mugs on the first day. Two days later, and person on instagram asked me for instructions on how to buy. Instagram does not allow hyperlinks, so I had to describe how to get to right website. Cumbersome, but it appeared to work, the fourth mug was sold that day.
    Two days later (yesterday), the fifth mug was still not sold. I posted on facebook about the last mug. I did not bother with instagram, because I could not link directly to the mug listing on instagram. Nothing happened. 
    Three days later (today), it was still not sold. I had scheduled a blast email about a show coming up this weekend. So I edited the email this morning to mention the last unsold mug. It was sold 30 minutes after the email went out.
    Just remember your email subscribers are far more interested in your work than anyone who follows you on social media. Next year, if I do this cup show again, I will not skip the blast email!
  14. Like
    LeeU reacted to glazenerd in My First Crystalline Attempts   
    Lee- I get questions about crystalline on a regular basis in PM and email; and will answer publicly when asked or if from someone I have been working with. I still read what is posted on a regular basis. Been working on a couple of articles for CM about the finer points of firing crystalline glaze: as Brandon just proved in his first firing- not as tough as it looks if you know the "tricks."
    Tom
     
  15. Like
    LeeU reacted to Babs in NVS-07 Pugmill experience   
    Min of the amazing memory, yes I do!.
    Bought second hand from an old potter many years ago. Great machine  heavy duty. 
    I find taking it apart  a major job now as the "barrel" is heavy for me now, always was but.. and bolt heads getting worn out. I rarely do this ,rather I keep in damp state..towels down the hopper and deairing orifice.  Exruding end I seal really well.
    Hoping the grid part outlives me:-))
    Gutsy machine.
  16. Like
    LeeU reacted to Babs in General Clay and Glaze Kiln Questions   
    Yes you can. All have different appearance so no mix up.
    What cone are you firing to?
    Your drawings will disappear...carbon will burn out.
    You can buy ceramic coloured "pencils" and pastels
    Glaze unfired is powdery so drawing on that will present problems
  17. Like
    LeeU reacted to Rae Reich in General Clay and Glaze Kiln Questions   
    Ceramic pencils are made of glaze and are meant to be used directly on bisque with a transparent clear or colored glaze over the drawing. They can be fired at low and high temperatures. 
    For "drawing" on unfired glaze, there are "scratch-through" techniques and drawing with a brush using oxides or colorants. 
    The interesting thing about drawing on pots is learning to draw on a surface that is curved, sometimes in complex ways.
  18. Like
    LeeU reacted to oldlady in QotW: How do you prefer to organize your tools for your work areas?   
    both big "tools" in my studio are actually work stations.   the slab roller is mounted on a heavy solid cord wooden door on top of a table built for the purpose.   i hang many tools off the front of it in a line.   i have marked the location of those tools with a sharpie dot so i can reach down without looking and get the tool i want.   i return it immediately to the same place so i am free to use the slab roller as an assembly table.
    the wheel is surrounded by a table and has tools hanging from nails on left and right.   these also are returned to their proper location after use so i can get that tool again without searching through a pile of discarded, dirty tools all over the table top.
    the rest of my studio might have piles of assorted things all over but those work areas are kept very clean.  those piles contain very important items i might use.  (in other words, my hoard.)
    two small boxes screwed to the slab roller are for the tiny crumbs that would otherwise stick to the bottom of the fabulously beautiful, extremely expensive things i make.  (HAH!)   those crumbs are otherwise a darn nuisance.    i have an album that shows all this.
  19. Like
    LeeU got a reaction from Rae Reich in QotW: How do you prefer to organize your tools for your work areas?   
    Each of my work stations (for functions in the process) has its own array of most-used tools and assists placed as neatly near by as possible. I use little household bins to hold horizontals and jars for uprights, bowls/catchalls for sponges, hooks for hanging things, carefully chosen shelving, and planned use of spaces under tables. My clay is in 5 gal buckets set on those plant-moving things with wheels, I use carts with drawers to store smalls, labeled by category.  I label everything so I can remember what's what (i.e. this shelf is bisque for glazing, that shelf is greenware etc.). I write the type of clay and cone, and type of glaze and cone, on masking tape and put that where I can see it at a glance. I try to put like items together-by size or type or function.  
    I have such a small space and I don't tolerate mess very well, especially my own, that I just have to keep it functional or I get put off and back out when I need to press ahead. It's kind of a mental containment strategy, to keep my studio so that I can walk in and just get to work and have what I need at hand without having to search for things  or clean them off first. 
  20. Like
    LeeU got a reaction from Rae Reich in First porcelain fire: questions   
    When I fire porcelain, in addition to the precautions re: glaze you've already mentioned, I put a bit of sand under each piece, so they can move ever so slightly and I do not leave the peep holes open, regardless of whether a fast or slow fire or during a slow cool. 
  21. Like
    LeeU got a reaction from Rae Reich in Recycling Clay   
    Indeed---one of the many therapeutic aspects of whacking the heck out of clay, wet or dry!! Even taking Mr. Hammer to those failed glazed & fired pieces is quite satisfying. And for wedging, cut & slam just feels oh-so-good! Dropping slabs with force onto the floor, also.  I could go on.....
     
  22. Like
    LeeU got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in QotW: How do you prefer to organize your tools for your work areas?   
    Each of my work stations (for functions in the process) has its own array of most-used tools and assists placed as neatly near by as possible. I use little household bins to hold horizontals and jars for uprights, bowls/catchalls for sponges, hooks for hanging things, carefully chosen shelving, and planned use of spaces under tables. My clay is in 5 gal buckets set on those plant-moving things with wheels, I use carts with drawers to store smalls, labeled by category.  I label everything so I can remember what's what (i.e. this shelf is bisque for glazing, that shelf is greenware etc.). I write the type of clay and cone, and type of glaze and cone, on masking tape and put that where I can see it at a glance. I try to put like items together-by size or type or function.  
    I have such a small space and I don't tolerate mess very well, especially my own, that I just have to keep it functional or I get put off and back out when I need to press ahead. It's kind of a mental containment strategy, to keep my studio so that I can walk in and just get to work and have what I need at hand without having to search for things  or clean them off first. 
  23. Like
    LeeU got a reaction from Pres in QotW: How do you prefer to organize your tools for your work areas?   
    Each of my work stations (for functions in the process) has its own array of most-used tools and assists placed as neatly near by as possible. I use little household bins to hold horizontals and jars for uprights, bowls/catchalls for sponges, hooks for hanging things, carefully chosen shelving, and planned use of spaces under tables. My clay is in 5 gal buckets set on those plant-moving things with wheels, I use carts with drawers to store smalls, labeled by category.  I label everything so I can remember what's what (i.e. this shelf is bisque for glazing, that shelf is greenware etc.). I write the type of clay and cone, and type of glaze and cone, on masking tape and put that where I can see it at a glance. I try to put like items together-by size or type or function.  
    I have such a small space and I don't tolerate mess very well, especially my own, that I just have to keep it functional or I get put off and back out when I need to press ahead. It's kind of a mental containment strategy, to keep my studio so that I can walk in and just get to work and have what I need at hand without having to search for things  or clean them off first. 
  24. Like
    LeeU reacted to oldlady in Rolling Pin Question/Recommendation   
    when you slice a piece of clay off a new block, slap it soundly on the floor and stretch it out .  flip it and  do it again from the opposite end, stretching it even more.  the slapping motion also compresses the clay and makes it more thixotropic.   your rolling pin will like working on stretched, compressed clay.
    when rolling, always start from the center of the piece of clay.   roll away for the first time and then from the center toward your tummy.  twirl the flat slab around a quarter turn and do it again.   as you work, try to continue that pattern every time you use a fresh piece of clay.    it is much easier to control the clay this way  than shoving the rolling pin into a mass of clay that wants to fight back.
  25. Like
    LeeU reacted to Bill Kielb in Scioto molded bisque   
    I sure like your 04 clear idea for color retention and safety. Not sure you can figure out in advance if it will craze though. Glazing the inside as well could  help strengthen the finished product I believe.
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