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alabama

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Posts posted by alabama


  1. If you're interested in Black on black pottery...you need the book "The Living Tradition of Maria Martinez ".

    Last month I got mine off Amazon for about 10 bucks including postage...used!  It's a huge coffee table type book!

    Check out the Facebook "the wild clay club"... they deal with natural clays and are based out Australia. 

    Primitive Pottery by Hal Riegger is a good book you might should ought to read!   

    Firing greenware will give the best results for Black on black pottery....  The reducing material used for the black should be DRY, not "it looks dry", or "it should be dry"....even a smidgen of moisture will cause a mottled exterior.  

    What less videos and read more, if you're serious about learning about southwest USA black pottery .  :)

    and make lots of notes.

     


  2. I have a Pacifica 400 and when my belts broke, I tried ordering some, but that fell thru...so I tried fixing them and that didn't work...so I went to the local auto parts store and bought a 520k4 serpentine belt ... The ridges from the pulleys fit inside the grooves of the belt...not perfectly, but good enough!  :)  about  $13.00


  3. On the Facebook there is a pottery instructor based in Pennsylvania that has taken a broken electric kiln and turned it into a cone 10 woodfired kiln!  It is raised off the ground, I guess for convenience!   In the bottom of the kiln are 2 nine inch intakes above the fire box and in the back is a 12 inch exhaust for the downdraft!  His results are great, plus it only takes about 8 hours to fire a load!  I plan to do this with an old electric kiln we have in storage at the art center...it has two sections, so the plan is to add height to it by adding fire bricks between the sections...so I can still use the lid!   I suppose this plan could be switched to propane gas...and if i happen to do this with the same kiln or build another, i already have a 250 gallon and a 500 gallon propane tank!  :)

    And if by chance you interested in making a refractory fiber kiln..you need to look on the YouTube...for 

    "Salt Glazing at Clay Art 2007"...!!!  :)   


  4. You may need to read and research more, and avoid modern books that require bisque firing.

    Primitive Pottery is a good book, articles or books about traditional pottery of the potters on the Ivory Coast, the book Traditional pottery of Papua New guinea is good, Sun Circles and Human Hands has examples of pottery.  

    Most of the unglazed ancient pottery were used for dry storage, like beans, corn, smoked jerky, etc.  The large ceramic cauldron used for cooking stayed hot pretty much 24/7 like a crock pot so food was safe to eat from it.

    Pit fired is a term that is a misnomer, kind of like "home cooked meals in a tv diner" ,   Pits for the purpose of firing pottery  are a modern invention that you'll see and understand after reading those books.     Good luck! :)


  5. On 3/1/2019 at 3:18 AM, Beggs n Achin said:

    Hubs was commenting, before I read him this post, that the little piece I had fired that glowed  white/yellow, reminded him of aluminum ore. And he also had read (bc he is the one that reads geology books for fun and rock hounds in our driveway) that the Willapa Hills where we are were a big source of aluminum ore, but that it was "dirty", or impure like our coal. Therefore it was cheaper to get aluminum elsewhere, and now we ship in our coal as well bc it is actually cheaper to ship it in than to pay to process it here. 

    Then... I'm reading in this pdf study here (again)  about the brick company that used to be here in Chehalis, and the description of the sample, that sure sounds like what I've got here , pg 186, and it describes them digging it out of the hillside and using it "run of pit" or mixed w more clay or sand to make it less goopy, or less sandy... does that mean they dig it out and used it?  I would be ok with a brick-lookin soap dish, if it didn't break when it absorbed water... My chimney is made from those same bricks, as are a lot of the buildings here.... yet my clay breaks when it gets wet. 

    I'm not tryin to argue, I'm just tryin to understand. Hubs just keeps reading the study and giving the same answer: "Our clay is brick clay"  They made bricks at that factory and also drain tile. I did note that they used coal for fuel, however.  It did not specify how long the bricks were fired. 

     

    On.pg 176 of the study, 1960 to 2165 degrees is the cone temp range given for the clays that are real close to where I'm at, as well. According to this chart http://www.bigceramicstore.com/info/ceramics/maxcone.html.   Also, the brick factory clay sample , pg 187 is listed as cone range 04 to 8, 1915 to 2212 degrees... per that chart.  I hope I'm doing that right. 

    So... I'm looking at this chart from this primitive pottery book... and this page amazingly let me upload it today... and it's fuzzy, doggone it... if I'm reaching a dull red, this primitive pottery book says I'm reaching  at least 1300 (in my wood stove.  I know. Totally unsafe and not designed for that. It's  amazing I'm still alive. lol) but higher than that nc we are goi g into the glowing bright orange stage w the bowls and cups. Only that tiny piece I did went yellow- it was the size of an arrowhead. 

    Then I'm reading on this page....       

    https://www.ceramics.net/custom-ceramics-manufacturing/technical-firing

    alumina fires at 2850- 3100.  So do the temperatures by color in this  old book of mine not apply then? Why would it glow orange and at what temps? Urf....  For reference,  the book is  here-  https://www.amazon.com/Make-Primitive-Pottery-Evard-Gibby/dp/0943604389/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?keywords=primitive+pottery&qid=1551435498&s=books&sr=1-1

    Ugh. I need a thermometer. And will get the other ingredients.  And mash things and burn things.  We have about 4   slag piles from where the former owners of our place logged. We have been pulling the sticks from there for firewood, as they are all dry. The water pressure here is not sufficient for me to feel comfortable doing a big burn on those piles and keep it under control so we use it in the house and it is dry and burns HOT. Heats the house very well.  So that's why it gets so hot in that stove. 

    I'm rattling on, sorry. Brain is crankin on this problem that exceeds my smartness. Hubs told me I won't  be able to fire this clay and so now I have to. lol 

    20190227_124834.jpg

     

    On 3/1/2019 at 3:18 AM, Beggs n Achin said:

    Hubs was commenting, before I read him this post, that the little piece I had fired that glowed  white/yellow, reminded him of aluminum ore. And he also had read (bc he is the one that reads geology books for fun and rock hounds in our driveway) that the Willapa Hills where we are were a big source of aluminum ore, but that it was "dirty", or impure like our coal. Therefore it was cheaper to get aluminum elsewhere, and now we ship in our coal as well bc it is actually cheaper to ship it in than to pay to process it here. 

    Then... I'm reading in this pdf study here (again)  about the brick company that used to be here in Chehalis, and the description of the sample, that sure sounds like what I've got here , pg 186, and it describes them digging it out of the hillside and using it "run of pit" or mixed w more clay or sand to make it less goopy, or less sandy... does that mean they dig it out and used it?  I would be ok with a brick-lookin soap dish, if it didn't break when it absorbed water... My chimney is made from those same bricks, as are a lot of the buildings here.... yet my clay breaks when it gets wet. 

    I'm not tryin to argue, I'm just tryin to understand. Hubs just keeps reading the study and giving the same answer: "Our clay is brick clay"  They made bricks at that factory and also drain tile. I did note that they used coal for fuel, however.  It did not specify how long the bricks were fired. 

     

    On.pg 176 of the study, 1960 to 2165 degrees is the cone temp range given for the clays that are real close to where I'm at, as well. According to this chart http://www.bigceramicstore.com/info/ceramics/maxcone.html.   Also, the brick factory clay sample , pg 187 is listed as cone range 04 to 8, 1915 to 2212 degrees... per that chart.  I hope I'm doing that right. 

    So... I'm looking at this chart from this primitive pottery book... and this page amazingly let me upload it today... and it's fuzzy, doggone it... if I'm reaching a dull red, this primitive pottery book says I'm reaching  at least 1300 (in my wood stove.  I know. Totally unsafe and not designed for that. It's  amazing I'm still alive. lol) but higher than that nc we are goi g into the glowing bright orange stage w the bowls and cups. Only that tiny piece I did went yellow- it was the size of an arrowhead. 

    Then I'm reading on this page....       

    https://www.ceramics.net/custom-ceramics-manufacturing/technical-firing

    alumina fires at 2850- 3100.  So do the temperatures by color in this  old book of mine not apply then? Why would it glow orange and at what temps? Urf....  For reference,  the book is  here-  https://www.amazon.com/Make-Primitive-Pottery-Evard-Gibby/dp/0943604389/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?keywords=primitive+pottery&qid=1551435498&s=books&sr=1-1

    Ugh. I need a thermometer. And will get the other ingredients.  And mash things and burn things.  We have about 4   slag piles from where the former owners of our place logged. We have been pulling the sticks from there for firewood, as they are all dry. The water pressure here is not sufficient for me to feel comfortable doing a big burn on those piles and keep it under control so we use it in the house and it is dry and burns HOT. Heats the house very well.  So that's why it gets so hot in that stove. 

    I'm rattling on, sorry. Brain is crankin on this problem that exceeds my smartness. Hubs told me I won't  be able to fire this clay and so now I have to. lol 

    20190227_124834.jpg

    I wouldn't buy anything written by McPherson,  not sure about Gibbys book, but have doubts...I have Simpson's book,(It won't help) ... I like Hal Rieggers book "Primitive Pottery ".  

    Alabama


  6. I knew a girl who used to fire pipes in her campfire. She used a grey earthenware clay and hand formed pipes during the day as a demonstration, Then as she cooked her supper the pipes were preheating until they sintered then they were laid on the coals and sticks were piled over them heating them to about 1000-1100 degrees or so. She was the girl who when I saw her pile of green pine needles, offered to get some dried pine needles and leaves, but she was quick to Tell me that it was the green leaves that turned her pipes purple and red like she wanted. When I fire pipes I push a stick in the ground and suspend the pipes off the ground on the sticks while they heat up. That way there is seldom any losses.


  7. Take a wooden ruler or stick and push a brad (small nail) at the height you want, then slide the bottom of the fuller around the bottom and the nail cuts off the top! If you want to make sure the top is level, after its bone dry spread some water on a flat surface and touch the rim to the water for a sec or two... The highest point of the rim will be wet.

     

    Alabama


  8. The way I use shells the most in the associated with hand built pottery are ribs. If you can find one that is smooth and somewhat oval and the right size, it can be used as a rib. If you flip the same shell over, its a scraper. The shell tool is unlikely to wear out in your lifetime! :). If you find a shell with a wavy edge it can used as a rocker stamp for texture and designs.

     

    See ya

    Alabama


  9. Shells are made from layers with a type of adhesive or bonding agent between the layers. The adhesive burns out above 451 degrees and the layers change to calcium hydroxide over 951 degrees. Calcium hydroxide is a powder that absorbs moisture from humidity, expands, and if there is enough crushed shells in the clay... The vessel will disintegrate with in a year! I know this is true about mussel shell... And assume sea shells are the same/similar!

    But then it doesn't hurt to experiment. :)


  10. There was in the 18th century up north a type of crock called coarse-ware and it was wheel throw with sand in it. Any sand that is the same size is probably what you're looking for. A couple of weeks ago I bought some "course sand" from the local sand and gravel company..its mixed with the larger particles a little larger than rice! Its for hand building! Do more experiments and let us know the results!!! :)


  11. We might need a photo or two... I add dripmarks to many of my vessels... I like the way they look! I accept every mistake and flaw on my stuff now a days... But there was a time when I'd freak out over drips, finger prints, runs, bare spots, etc. But I no longer do... What I tell the students who bump and cause fresh glaze to flake off is there's a 50/50 chance that mark will improve the surface. It's hard to convince them!! I'm not sure what would set me off...but rest assure it's not anything near a drip!


  12. I make pipes by rolling out a 6 inch piece of clay on the table. Take a long stick or artist paint brush handle and stick it thru the 6" stem by wetting the end of handle, stopping 1/2 inch from end, leave the handle in the clay and take a needle tool and probe the clay til you find the end, then mark it by wallering the marked area out. Then make a bowl in hour hand or rolling out a piece of clay on the table then attach the bowl to the stem...with the bowl attached, remove the handle... allow it to become leather hard, than carve it when it becomes leather hard with a pen knife to get the shape you want. All my pipes have two openings on each end. A pipe isn't something you need to over think!


  13. I was told to improve plasticity to pour the water of boiled potatoes or rice into the clay. That water by itself doesn't work as well. I never tried it though since if I didn't like the characteristics of one clay I'd find another clay vein at another river bank or add regular store brought clay to the bucket of local clay. I did find one dark blue clay that would only shallow bowls, The Gray clay below it would make anything so I mixed the two together then only dug the lower clay. And I've had to mix two different store bought clays together to improve one of them!


  14. On stoneware I sign my name backwards at the top of the foot. Below the backward name is the backward date. Midway the foot on the left is cone ten or six. Directly across on the right is the pounds of clay it took to make the vessel. And on the bottom of the foot is the date the original was made and the country it originated from!!! So name, date, cone, weight, 1685 Belgium. Something like that!

     

    On the Indian pottery its just name and date regular style, smeared/covered with clay, on the inside wall.


  15. Appears to be a natural gray vein of clay with limonite. The kind you'd make bricks from.

    The one one the right seems to have been fired upside down judging from the smudge marks on the rims. Seeing no visible cracks makes me think the amount of grog in the clay is over 35%.

    Probably made for tourist!

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