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enbarro

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About enbarro

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  1. I just found out a few days ago, that's why I thought it was a good idea to start the thread. Probably there are many potters in the same situation...
  2. That's good news, next Friday is better than next month.
  3. Thanks Neil, that was the confirmation I was looking for. I had checked the local government's website and I didn’t qualify to fill the regular unemployment form. Then, thought maybe I needed to check some Federal website to find the form and didn’t find one either. It’s likely that the local government is still in the process of ironing the details too.
  4. Thanks, just saw Senator Schumer on TV saying that the legislation was set to include part-time workers and self employed… So, I also think potters should qualify for some kind of benefits, don’t which, though. Maybe the new form the Senator was referring to is not ready yet… Have all my papers/tax info in order. I hope some kind of help comes through. It’s not like I wasn’t prepared for an emergency, but not this kind. It could take 6 months or more for things to go back to normal…
  5. Hi, I’ve been searching for a week but haven’t been able to confirm if independent working potters qualify for Federal unemployment benefits here in USA? This is the first time I’ve ever had the need to ask for this kind of assistance. I’m a bit lost. I browsed through the link with resources but didn’t spot any information about the Federal Programs… Thanks
  6. I’m confident you’ll find a solution very soon. When I started most manufacturers where in the process of reformulating leaded glazes (which up to that point many where still considered and labeled as food safe) to make them lead-free and for a while the new recipes were not very good for brushing. These days there are many good options.
  7. It sounds to me like the glaze might need more binding (gum) material… https://digitalfire.com/4sight/troubleshooting/ceramic_troubleshooting_powdering_cracking_and_settling_glazes.html ‘’Add CMC gum to powdering glazes. In industry gums are standard practice, companies know how to deal with their side effects. But potters should be aware of the impact of using a gum. Like bentonite, it needs to be added during dry mixing. Gum is glue, it is very sticky, it hardens. Using gum is a crow-bar approach, a way of 'gluing' a glaze on the ware. Strangely gum also helps suspend. Gum bu
  8. You’re welcome. I also had a hard time figuring low fire clay/glazes when I started many years ago due to the lack of information available then on web. Is your friend using the same clay? Have you checked if she/he is applying the glaze in the same manner? Would he/she be willing to fire a small glazed bowl of yours and vice-versa? There are several things that can be causing the problem, but if you say that the glaze looks like paste then most likely the problems is the glazes need a suspender/binder and maybe remixing. Does the glaze after a few days of being unused separates wit
  9. Not an easy task and most probably not very durable. :( at low firing temperature even many glossy glazes are not durable... Also, at low temperature my experiments over the years have yield whitish/milky transparent rather than clear. You could search for a recipe containing barium (either carbonate or frits like the P-626) or maybe lithium, but I wouldn't use it for functional work. You could try locating this book in a nearby library which has tons of recipes: The Potter's Complete Book of Clay and Glazes: A Comprehensive Guide to Formulating, Mixing, Applying, and Firing Clay Bodies
  10. Maybe just get a few small jars to try and see what works for you... I mix most of my glazes, but do use some commercial glazes, among them Duncan, Mayco and Speedball. I have used Amaco glazes too. Speedball glazes are the best ones for brushing, but the color options are very limited and many of them are rather ugly when used on red clay or just plain ugly in any type of clay. I have tried to find which gum/adhesive/suspender they use (smell like a gluestick I used in grade school of which I can’t remember the name ) but no luck so far… They aren’t vibrant in color, probably not wh
  11. Sometimes I've noticed the recycled clay being short, I use it for small pots... The local supplier doesn't sell the dry clay mix. Would the short clay cause cracking problems with small 4"x 4" terracota slabs? Thanks
  12. Cone 03 and cone 3, not the same thing... But if you actually fire cone 03, the link below has several recipes for slips that can be used on greenware and bisque. www.priscillahollingsworth.com/uploads/4/9/8/3/4983085/lowfire_glaze_list.pdf Btw, underglazes are usually dry (not glossy), is that what you are looking for? Regards
  13. Yes, zircopax can be used to make white glazes. The problem might be it giving a different kind of white, if the white stain sold where you live uses Titanium or Tin Oxide as an opacifier instead of zirconium silicate. Some people feel the Zirconium white is too bright/harsh, you can use half Zircopax, half Tin oxide and or add small amounts of Titanium Oxide or light rutile to tone it down. I think you are firing to cone 5? Not sure how much you’d need to add, because I use cone 03 terracotta clay. Some recipes call for up to 20% of zircopax. I use about 12-15% (but usually 10% is enough
  14. Hi, I’m ordering zirconium silicate. Through the years the names and manufacturers have changed. It’s been some years since I last placed my last order and would like some help. I used to buy plain Zircopax, the Super Pax, then Ultrox 500 and last time Zircopax Plus. Yesterday, when asked, the store told me that both Zircopax and Superpax where manufactured by Endeka and that they come in the the same bag labeled Zircopax Plus but one has a sticker that says Zircopax and the othe Super Pax. A search in the web revealed that Endeka was acquired by Ferro last year, but no news about wh
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