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Lena Arice Lucas

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  1. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas got a reaction from Roberta12 in Preventing Glaze From Running On Pipes   
    Hi James,
     
    Try dipping the pipes quickly in water prior to dipping (or you could spray/mist/spritz with water).
     
    That will decrease absorption and thus reduce glaze thickness.
     
    Experiment with amount of time you dip into the water (or spray), and thus how wet the piece becomes, and the amount of time between water dipping and glazing, since the thickness of both the bisque and the glaze will effect glaze absorbtion thickness. (Spraying water on vs dipping in water may keep moisture more consistant.)
      Depending on the thickness consistancy of the piece, you may opt to only wet the thicker (if there are any) parts, or wet thicker part more thoroughly to assure more consistant wetting.
     
    Experiment with how long you dip/spray. You could try simply, more quickly, dip "in and out," forgetting "how many seconds" for now...
     
    Also after dipping/spraying, have a dry towel ready to quickly dry off any areas that are wetter so glaze absorbtion will be more equal. 
     
    Good luck.
  2. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Preventing Glaze From Running On Pipes   
    Hi James,
     
    Try dipping the pipes quickly in water prior to dipping (or you could spray/mist/spritz with water).
     
    That will decrease absorption and thus reduce glaze thickness.
     
    Experiment with amount of time you dip into the water (or spray), and thus how wet the piece becomes, and the amount of time between water dipping and glazing, since the thickness of both the bisque and the glaze will effect glaze absorbtion thickness. (Spraying water on vs dipping in water may keep moisture more consistant.)
      Depending on the thickness consistancy of the piece, you may opt to only wet the thicker (if there are any) parts, or wet thicker part more thoroughly to assure more consistant wetting.
     
    Experiment with how long you dip/spray. You could try simply, more quickly, dip "in and out," forgetting "how many seconds" for now...
     
    Also after dipping/spraying, have a dry towel ready to quickly dry off any areas that are wetter so glaze absorbtion will be more equal. 
     
    Good luck.
  3. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas reacted to What? in How Do You Make These Lids?   
    Now that I read Pres reply throw with the finial and save yourself a few minutes. They are not that large.
  4. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas got a reaction from GiselleNo5 in Copycat Ceramic Work   
    As they say, "Imitation is the most annoying form of flattery." 
     
    That said, it is useful to copy your teacher (if they demand or allow it) when you are a student. If you can use the same techniques but apply them to your own forms (again, if they demand or allow it), better. It is also useful to copy the "Masters."
     
    A good pottery/clay sculpture teacher (hopefully) does not create potters "in their own image," meaning, hopefully the technical aspects and physics of clay have been learned by you from your teacher(s), or by years of focused trial and error. Therefore you will learn enough some day so clay can serve your personal creative vision's intent, and you will not just be another one of those potters whose works all look like each others...
     
    I find my greatest personal clay breakthroughs have taken place between the hours of 1 and 3 AM (spent alone in the studio). I do not usually stay up that late... I think my tired state of mind lowers filters and helps release some inner something (wading boots needed, getting deep in here). It may be worth a try for you...
     
    Luck.
     
  5. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas got a reaction from LeeU in Electric Kiln Firing Help   
    This is not about firing times, but will hopefully help folks to position the cone or mini bar correctly. 
     
    (There is "Kiln Loading" section in the front, with cone info in the back.)
     
    If your cone is not set right, the whole load could mess up... (overfiring is one typical problem).
     
    (I put this together years ago for my students {and teachers} who were getting their own kilns that had kiln-sitters.)
     
    See PDF.
     
    Luck!
    Lena
    Kilns and Cones, a Simple Guide by Lena Arice Lucas.pdf
    Kilns and Cones, a Simple Guide by Lena Arice Lucas.pdf
  6. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Wedging Table Surface Options   
    Fun this topic just popped back up. My dad, brother and I just finished building this:
     
     
    It is basically a work table, with 2 wedging tables on one end. Each at different heights for different jobs. When I am wedging up a big bowl or something I want to throw off hump. I wedge a ton of clay, so I need a lower surface, but when I am just measuring out mugs or pieces that are less than a # or 2 I like to have a higher surface. So I came up with this design and we built it today. 65 dollars for the lumber and screws from homedepot. Also has a place for clay storage below.
     
    I haven't finished yet it. I need to install a wire to cut clay from the top table to the bottom, and I also need to get hardibacker boards cut and screwed on.
  7. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas reacted to Judy_in_GA in Wedging Table Surface Options   
    Lena,
    Is that a phone book on the wall behind your wedging table? If so, how do you use it? Instead of newspaper?
    Thx!
    Judy
  8. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas reacted to clay lover in Wedging Table Surface Options   
    I am thinking the same thing.
  9. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas reacted to Benzine in Wedging Table Surface Options   
    Lena, those are some great jars.
  10. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas got a reaction from Babs in Why Decorate Pots?   
    Why not?
     
    Humans separated themselves from non-humans by making tools and art... decorating their tools, bodies and early utilitarian objects, dwellings, etc., for various sacred/magical/pleasurable reasons.
     
    Some pots want/ask for decoration, others don't.
     
    Decorating a pot to me is no different that painting a painting or making a sculpture or composing music... 
     
    It is a a journey in the moment to be taken and enjoyed.
     
    Why make food attractive? We don't have to, but it sure makes eating more enjoyable.
     
    Okay, where are my wading boots?
     
    We could get into "Why make art at all?" in no time, but that's another subject...or is it??
     
    I'm just gald people do make, decorate, enjoy, use, collect, admire... pots.
     
    Lena
    Lena Arice Lucas - Art
  11. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas got a reaction from Rebekah Krieger in Uneven Glaze..   
    More suggestions (trimming this time) following your comment to my posting to you above:
     
    After trimming a groggy clay body pot, you can take a damp sponge and as pot spins med. speed, apply sponge to trimmed parts of pot to raise a bit of slip. Don't over do it or you'll just wash away fine clay and leave a groggier pot than you started.
     
    You can often dampen fingers and treat foot like you would a rim-compression, depending on wetness level. sometimes that is enough.
     
    Or you can take the burnishing end of the modeling stick (the curved rounded end of stick some use to trim away support clay ay bottom, etc.), and while the wheel still turns, burnish in the grog. This "packs it back" into the surface.
     
    Don't leave the part of the pot you intend to glaze "burnished" though (the glaze could be more likely to crawl there). Go over that part again, as wheel spins, to quickly raise a slip surface that will now resemble the untrimmed surface, thus the glaze will behave closer to the same way on all surfaces. Finish with a final burnishing with the modeling stick, and you may use finger "foot compression" move again too, to make a nice smooth foot that will not be as likely to scratch furniture. 
     
    Have fun learning! 
     
    Lena
     
    P.S. Here are some trimming demo photos (start there and click forward). https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201698754417846&set=a.10201698722737054.1073741831.1449636499&type=3&theater
  12. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Uneven Glaze..   
    You are trying new glaze applications/new glazes, so you are a beginner in that regard. You are experiencing what I used to tell (before I retired) my beginning pottery students, a "What you do is what you get" result. Then I'd explain why certain glazing problems occur and how to prevent them. You have been given some good advice here already. You are trying to get more even coverage.
     
    Here's my addition:
     
    I wax first so wax dries faster (on a dry pot). I then always very quickly rinse my pots and very quickly dry off with a clean, dry towel, to both remove dust and prevent the glazes from going on too thick (especially if overlapping/double dipping). I then wait a few minutes before glazing... (Other potters do it differently yet we are all making pots, so, whatever you like's okay as long as it's working.)
     
    Brushing? Are you using a good, "fully charged" (full of glaze) "Mop" style brush? Google it to see. Use a mop brush and apply with pot either on a real good, heavy, long-spinning banding wheel, or place and center the pot on your potters wheel and turn slowly. Fewer brush strokes will show. I have applied glazes this way before (without adding fillers, since I like glazes to be a brush-able and dip/pourable), to fine result.
     
    Better still, dip or pour or both.
     
    Mix enough glaze to pour the inside. Fill to about half way, pour back out while turning pot to coat inside. Allow to dry. (Practice application on bisque ware/any suitable container half filled with water until you get the technique down.) Have enough glaze so you can dip the outside, holding the inside with both hands with fingers pointed outward if possible, keeping pot right-side up and horizontal. I dip in and out. I do not "count." That's because I have mixed my glazed to a thickness I desire, no "counting" is needed. Keeping the pot level, I dip in and out at a reasonable speed but not so fast as to splash or so slow as to saturate the pot with water.
     
    Allow to dry. Touch-up the rim by scraping off (use a blade of some kind) uneven areas and painting/banding on - with a "fully-charged" brush (meaning one that holds enough glaze to make it around the rim) (use poters-wheel or banding wheel) about 3 med-thin coats to equal same thickness as poured/dipped glaze on pot.
     
    If you don't have enough glaze to dip the outside, after glazing the inside as described above, place pot - upside-down - on a couple of dowels/small sticks over a container, and pour glaze over quickly, starting on one side. Best if you make it all the way around before the glaze "start" side dries.
     
    Allow to dry. Clean foot completely (so you won't have to handle it much after finishing lip/rim), and scrap uneven areas off this blade where pot and dowels/sticks met to create even appearance. Or, use a scraper/blade to remove all glaze from rim/lip and apply fresh, even rim glaze with brush on banding wheel/potters-wheel.
     
    These techniques make it easy to apply different glazes on inside than outside. 
     
    I suggest always finishing all glaze coats on the inside before glazing the outside, unless you are using dipping tongs. (Glossy glazes are desirable for the inside of functional ware.)
     
    Dipping tongs are another story... "In and out and upside down" quickly enough that glaze is still flowing as the pot is removed thus evening out... Have sponge ready to dab glaze off bottom. Keep upside down until it dries enough to not drip when you turn it right-side up. I won't get into tongs any further for now. Decent tong glazing (sans "snake-bite" tong marks, etc.,) is a whole, long explanation.
     
    Advice on your pots? When looking at people's pottery, look as closely at the foot and bottom as you do the rest of the pot. How did the potter complete the bottom? The shape and size of the foot in regards to the overall pot? Are there feet you like? Try them out on your pots. Footless? Fine, just remember the bottom of your pots is where one's name usually is, so be tidy. Good pottery designers have a 360 degree involvement with their pottery.
     
    Also, Make lots of pots. The more clay that passes through your hands, the better you'll get. 
     
    Best of luck!
     
    Lena
  13. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas reacted to bciskepottery in Opening The Kiln   
    A ware removed from the oven, full of hot (and presumably tasty) food, will cool more slowly because of the heat mass of the contents than an empty ware removed from a kiln.  So, yes, there is a difference.  I'd recommend patience for removing from the kiln. 
  14. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas reacted to PSC in Opening The Kiln   
    I have a rule, if i can't touch the ware with a bare hand and lift it out of the kiln then it stays in the kiln. As a kid i also was perfectly fine waiting til daylight to get up and open my presents the santa brought me.
  15. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas reacted to bciskepottery in Uneven Glaze..   
    On your mug, think about using a liner glaze on the inside and the matte glaze on the outside.  A matte finish is often obtained when the glaze materials are not fully melted and you get a neat crystal that makes the surface matte.  But that could lead to some issues with leeching on surfaces that are in contact with food or beverages.  Is the matte glaze copper based?  Nice handle. 
     
    On your wine cooler, a truly bad shino is a carbon-trap shino that comes out snot green.  Did you allow the pot time (a few hours or overnight, preferably) to dry after you washed the first glaze off and before applying the second coat?  If you did not allow time for the wash water to evaporate, the difficulty in glazing may have been because the pot was too water logged from the washing and the bisque could not absorb the water out of the second coat.  Basically, you just moved the second glaze coat around resulting in uneven application and brush marks.
     
    Like with most things pottery related, you get better with practice.  Don't worry; make another pot. 
  16. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas reacted to Marcia Selsor in Uneven Glaze..   
    I either do a fast rinse in a bucket, or use damp sponge. I always clean my pots before glazing. They are usually ready to go by the time I get the glazes stirred up.My glazes are mixed for dipping according to my practice of dampening the pots. If I don't dampen the pots, the glaze goes on too thick.
    Neil's advice is also true for the way the glaze is mixed for application. We have all developed our personal methods.I dip and count to 10....but my pots are slower to absorb the glaze because of previous dampness...not wet and not soaked.
     
    Marcia
  17. Like
    Lena Arice Lucas reacted to neilestrick in Uneven Glaze..   
    I have never wet my pots before dipping. It limits how much glaze the pot can accept. Glazes that are mixed for dipping will not brush well at all. Additives are necessary to make them brushable. Every glaze goes on differently. Some show drips more than others. I mix my glazes to a thick chocolate milk consistency and dip for a 6 count.
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