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Heidi

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Posts posted by Heidi


  1. If space is at a premium or you'd like your table for multiple uses, I cut 4 pieces of 3/4 plywood ( 2- 24x48 for white clay and 2- 18x36" for red clay) and screwed 2 together then covered them with canvas. A small piece of rubberized shelf liner laid on the table will prevent the

    wedging/handbuilding boards from sliding around. The afterwards, just put the boards against the wall out of the way.....

    Just a thought...

     

    What a nice idea! I will do this

     

    thanks very much


  2. If space is at a premium or you'd like your table for multiple uses, I cut 4 pieces of 3/4 plywood ( 2- 24x48 for white clay and 2- 18x36" for red clay) and screwed 2 together then covered them with canvas. A small piece of rubberized shelf liner laid on the table will prevent the

    wedging/handbuilding boards from sliding around. The afterwards, just put the boards against the wall out of the way.....

    Just a thought...

     

    What a nice idea! I will do this


  3. I spent the last couple weeks spiffing up my work area. Used Christmas cash to buy some new shelves for the studio and some big glass jars to store glazes in. That was a great time to give the studio a good cleaning and start the year fresh. I was given a storied old home made kick wheel a few weeks ago, so that's been added to the studio - its nice to have a dedicated trimming station and a wheel for nieces and whatnot to play at. The glaze area got a new, double-tub sink and sprayer and now has hot *and* cold water (great, since its outdoors) and that means the driveway - er kiln yard - now has a sink for raku and other purposes. Woo hoo!

     

    I got my first check from the gallery up the mountain, and right away bough a new Slab Mat and some pokey things. Oh! And my local clay supplier gave me 100 pounds of porcelain in exchange for replacing the keyboard on their laptop!

    I'm getting ready to load the new downdraft kiln for its 4th firing. The first was OK, the second was way over-fired and not surprisingly the 3rd was very under-fired. Wonder what this load will bring.

    The firing after this one is going to be all shino glazes I think.

     

    So, yesterday was spent throwing dog bowls and tea bowls.

    post-757-132768501902_thumb.jpg

    I've also been doing some hand building for raku pieces - the local Ace Hardware gave me a piece of embossed wallpaper and I've been playing with that.

    post-757-132768515521_thumb.jpg

     

     

    Today, a little more throwing and then I have a whole lot of glazing to do!

     

     

    Handbuilding piece is just awesome!


  4. Hi

    last year I was addicted to 'wiggle wire' and the mass of patterns I could create. Now they can be bought at ceramic supply stores, but its fun to collect springs of all sizes (tiny ones from pens, up to 1/2" diam from hardware) and stretch them out yourself.

    The cheese slicerpost-6239-132797317587_thumb.jpgs are available from all good kitchen shops but are very expensive ($20-50) Australian. And it seems crazy to 'wreck' an object you've paid that much for.

    I've collected 10-12 from what we call 'opportunity shops' second hand charity shops. I've paid under a dollar for each one.

    they are easy to insert a new 'wiggle wire' into, just undo 2 screws.

    Have fun. thought I'd upload some of my tea sets I made based on wiggle wire surfaces

    cheers, Lyn

     

     

     

    Lynnie - your teasets are beautiful


  5. Not as big a milestone as yours but after struggling for almost two years with centring clay I got a late (and slow) start in wheelwork. I recently saw a video on how to centre pots on the wheel and to trim without using coils of clay to hold the pots to the wheel. First try, my small pot flew off the wheel and broke. Second try I got it right and have gotten it right ever since. I felt quite proud of myself!


  6. Many thanks for your approach to "any pictures" ;-)

     

    I'm totally impressed by claclanas work! blink.gif wonderful!

     

    I'm just a beginner in throwing, I like figurative work.

    to anyone who want to look:

    http://maoridesign.jimdo.com/ (sorry, it's only in German).

    Comments in the guestbook appreciated (German: Gästebuch)

     

    Maorili, didn't need to speak your languange to see that your work is absolutely beautiful!


  7. Hi I'm Heidi living in Cape Town, South Africa. I am 45 yrs old and started pottery 2 years ago with once weekly classes on a Saturday morning. I was hooked after the first class and have been learning ever since. Besides my classes, I also learn via the internet and trying out lots of the stuff that I read about.

    I have just bought an old second hand pottery wheel but I do my firing at the local pottery supply store. I haven't sold anything yet but have made lots of functional items as gifts for family, friends and colleagues - and learning in the process.

    Nice to meet you all.


  8. I take a bag of white clay with no grogg, I use Tucker's MCS a cone 6-8 porcelain ,and cube it up into a 5 gallon bucket of water untill it is covered with water. Cover and let it sit for 4-5 days. When it feels like the cubes are soft and creamy, use a big blender stick that goes on an electric drill, like a pro paint stirrer.

     

    Be really sure you keep the blender head BELOW the level of the clay-water and mixr untill the cubes disappear. Mixture will be like thick sour cream. It needs to be the consistancy that you can blend it well, top to bottom, and have no cubes left. Add water if needed. You need to be able to get it through a sieve.

    Run the glop through at least a 40 mesh sieve, I go to 60 for basic slip and finer if needed to be really creamy.

    This will give you a generous amount of white slip if you need it thinner, add more water and blend. If it is too thin, let it sit for a dat and water will come to the top, spoon it off, leave a depression in the middle, water will collect there and can be removed till it suits you.

    This can be done on a smaller scale, use a blender stick in a deep bowl, but since it keeps forever and clean up is a chore, I do alot at a time.

    You must keep it well covered, or you will get crunchy edges and surface that will cause application problems. Have fun, it's a mess, but I love slip.

     

    Are you considering colors? that is also way fun.smile.gif

     

    This sounds perfect (nice and simple) - thank you

     

    By the way I want to use the slip on leatherhard stoneware for high fire and not for the pitfired pots.

     

    Yes, would love to make coloured slip in future

  9. I take a bag of white clay with no grogg, I use Tucker's MCS a cone 6-8 porcelain ,and cube it up into a 5 gallon bucket of water untill it is covered with water. Cover and let it sit for 4-5 days. When it feels like the cubes are soft and creamy, use a big blender stick that goes on an electric drill, like a pro paint stirrer.

     

    Be really sure you keep the blender head BELOW the level of the clay-water and mixr untill the cubes disappear. Mixture will be like thick sour cream. It needs to be the consistancy that you can blend it well, top to bottom, and have no cubes left. Add water if needed. You need to be able to get it through a sieve.

    Run the glop through at least a 40 mesh sieve, I go to 60 for basic slip and finer if needed to be really creamy.

    This will give you a generous amount of white slip if you need it thinner, add more water and blend. If it is too thin, let it sit for a dat and water will come to the top, spoon it off, leave a depression in the middle, water will collect there and can be removed till it suits you.

    This can be done on a smaller scale, use a blender stick in a deep bowl, but since it keeps forever and clean up is a chore, I do alot at a time.

    You must keep it well covered, or you will get crunchy edges and surface that will cause application problems. Have fun, it's a mess, but I love slip.

     

    Are you considering colors? that is also way fun.smile.gif

     

    This sounds perfect (nice and simple) - thank you

     

    By the way I want to use the slip on leatherhard stoneware for high fire and not for the pitfired pots.

  10. I take a bag of white clay with no grogg, I use Tucker's MCS a cone 6-8 porcelain ,and cube it up into a 5 gallon bucket of water untill it is covered with water. Cover and let it sit for 4-5 days. When it feels like the cubes are soft and creamy, use a big blender stick that goes on an electric drill, like a pro paint stirrer.

     

    Be really sure you keep the blender head BELOW the level of the clay-water and mixr untill the cubes disappear. Mixture will be like thick sour cream. It needs to be the consistancy that you can blend it well, top to bottom, and have no cubes left. Add water if needed. You need to be able to get it through a sieve.

    Run the glop through at least a 40 mesh sieve, I go to 60 for basic slip and finer if needed to be really creamy.

    This will give you a generous amount of white slip if you need it thinner, add more water and blend. If it is too thin, let it sit for a dat and water will come to the top, spoon it off, leave a depression in the middle, water will collect there and can be removed till it suits you.

    This can be done on a smaller scale, use a blender stick in a deep bowl, but since it keeps forever and clean up is a chore, I do alot at a time.

    You must keep it well covered, or you will get crunchy edges and surface that will cause application problems. Have fun, it's a mess, but I love slip.

     

    Are you considering colors? that is also way fun.smile.gif

     

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