Jump to content

Karen B

Members
  • Content Count

    238
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Karen B

  1. After I fill the kiln, I clean the tools (in buckets of rainwater) and recycle the splash pans and slop buckets. One wheel for brown clay, one for white clay.
  2. I fire terra cotta hotter than 04. It makes for a rich brown color.
  3. I thought it looked like dunting too. In my experience a drying crack will open on the surface on which it began and taper away from that surface. The vast majority of cracks either begin on the bat or at trimming (when the compacted clay is removed from a thick bottom and the non-compacted clay is exposed--giving different rates of expansion and evaporation, or tears from a bad/dull tool). Any cracking I've seen like that was from dunting. But, I don't do slab building so I hesitated to comment. No trimming involved. Dunting is cracking when heated too fast or cooled too fast. Neither occurred. The issues in question are the clay used and the drag on the shelves or the overlap on the split shelves. When the current work is dry I will be trying the very good suggestions for firing. If there are still problems, I will investigate other clays, or wedge in silica sand to the current clay body. Thank you.
  4. Thank you. The back is white. will take picture when I have more time. i have thrown lots of pieces with this clay. nice plasticity. normally I use S112 from Laguna, used to be from Miller. But I need white clay in order to get this yellow glaze to be effective. i have a porcelain I use for throwing but it is a waste to use it for slab work which needs to be thicker, thus negating the beautiful translucency. I was interested in the structure of the platter. Is there a foot? Also it appears that the cracks are actually dunted. Was the kiln opened while the ware was cooling down? The edges of the cracks appear to be rounded which can imply thermal shock of some sort. Thank you for your help. No foot. As I said, I used an extended cool down program. I do not open kiln till below 100 degrees or usually room temp. I was under the impression that rounded edges on cracks indicates melt, which happens while firing. Sharp edges happen when it cracks while cooling as the melting is finished.
  5. Thank you. The back is white. will take picture when I have more time. i have thrown lots of pieces with this clay. nice plasticity. normally I use S112 from Laguna, used to be from Miller. But I need white clay in order to get this yellow glaze to be effective. i have a porcelain I use for throwing but it is a waste to use it for slab work which needs to be thicker, thus negating the beautiful translucency.
  6. Cute picture. Good Job Grampa. When I first got my own wheels 11 years ago, I was so excited to teach my kids. They sat at the wheel and I could see right away that their little arms couldn't reach the wheel head. I promised them this summer I would teach them to throw.
  7. Thank you, Marcia, for your opinion. I will test the coil method.
  8. A relief to hear your feedback on the split shelves. Thanks!
  9. I am not familiar with Jeffs White but it sounds like a tight body (lack of sand or grog??) I work with cone 10 porcelain and it is a tight body as well. For larger forms I use a body called 1/2 and 1/2 its 1/2 porcelain and 1/2 wso from Laguna Clay Co. I would get a body that is less tight I feel it may be the body first and the firing 2nd. If you use a body that can handle large forms but still is a little rough coat it with smooth slip. Also use the coils as Marcia suggested or grog or better still put a THIN slab of same clay under piece that does the dragging and bisque and glaze fire it under the piece for booth fires and it will shrink and take the slide better-you can put grog or silica balls (round fired ball bearings from silica-these are hard to find now) A thrown form is stronger than a slab form as well I have fired a fish that was 3 feet long and spanned 3 shelves with the slab under it and all was well more than once. Mark PS work out the body issues and test a large piece before doing all that work on it. I have fired large (18") platters in my electric on edge as well before Thank you Mark. I will investigate other white stoneware options, and, or, wedge in some grog for future works. I appreciate your suggestions and will try them, and, am in awe of the platters fired successfully on edge. I will not be trying that. : )
  10. Thank you so much for your kind words Clayshapes.
  11. Check coils first by turning on the kiln with the top opened. If they are not all heating, you just won't get to cone 6.
  12. A couple of years ago I rolled out white stoneware and made 3 large platters (19 inches) with extensive surface design. They all broke into 3 or 4 large pieces. Now I have a Bailey slab roller and made a couple of rounded rectangle tiles (18 x 10). I ran them once through the slab roller (5/8"). They both cracked into large warped pieces in the bisque. I tried again with the platters and rolled them down gradually in different directions until they were at 5/8 inch. I put them on the wheel to cut them round (20 inches) and did a little compression with a rib, as well as pulled up a rim. They are drying now and I hate to lose them in the firing. My questions are, should I buy single shelves to fire them on? Could it be the fault of the overlap on 2 half shelves? Should I try putting, maybe, grog underneath them to create a movable surface? Or, could the way I rolled them out do the trick? I'm firing to cone 6 electric with an extended cool down program. Attached is a picture of one of the platters, rolled by hand, that I glued back together. You can see the cracks. Thank you.
  13. There are usually 3 or so small holes drilled in the cover. Air should get sucked through by the vent. If you are looking to get nice crystallization effects, look into slow cooling. That is what will make the difference in how your glazes look.
  14. I was told by Amica in Massachusetts that they will not cover any equipment in my home studio, which is an attached garage. I found this out when I called Amica to find out about insurance for a craft show. The agent then proceeded to hound me about my kiln (electric) and studio. I had to call her supervisor to get her to stop calling me. I think she was new and trying to make a name for herself or something.
  15. You would be able to tell when the kiln went off by how fired your clay looks. Is it bisque pink? or high fired looking? Is it still basically raw?
  16. It helped me a great deal to make my glazes thin, which was counter to how I learned many years ago. With a simple matte white, the clay and all the things I do to it shows through.
  17. Most amazing article. So much patience. Thanks for posting.
  18. I had this problem 7 yrs ago. It got to the point that I couldn't lift my right arm without extreme pain then the left arm since I was overtaxing it. There was a happy ending. I tried chiropractor, acupuncture, yoga, orthopedist and the cortisone shot to no avail. Finally I went to a wonderful and knowledgeable Physical Therapist. ( I also went to a terrible one first). He saved me from having to get surgery. He gently helped me get full range of motion back by gently moving the arms and then gave me exercises which I still do to this day. I wonder if you are pushing your shoulders forward (sort of a hunched position) which stresses them. Don't wait like I did, get help, get strong.
  19. I got a little item called a Square Card Reader. It plugs into an Ipad or other portable pad. It allows me to accept credit cards with the utmost simplicity. Sales doubled at my open studio because of this.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.