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Dick White

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  1. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Pyewackette in Test kilns   
    That one is 240v (220 isn't much of a thing anymore, the national grid is standard on 120/240 now) and being small, it should be able to handle midfire with no problems. The issue with small kilns and testing is that they cool so much more rapidly than a big kiln, so your glaze results may be different. To get around that, you need to be facile with the ramp hold programming so you can add slow cool segments to the end of the firing. As for the pilot light, that's just the little red light bulb on the side of the controller case that blinks on and off in tandem with when the elements are on.
  2. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Hulk in Test kilns   
    That one is 240v (220 isn't much of a thing anymore, the national grid is standard on 120/240 now) and being small, it should be able to handle midfire with no problems. The issue with small kilns and testing is that they cool so much more rapidly than a big kiln, so your glaze results may be different. To get around that, you need to be facile with the ramp hold programming so you can add slow cool segments to the end of the firing. As for the pilot light, that's just the little red light bulb on the side of the controller case that blinks on and off in tandem with when the elements are on.
  3. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in Test kilns   
    That one is 240v (220 isn't much of a thing anymore, the national grid is standard on 120/240 now) and being small, it should be able to handle midfire with no problems. The issue with small kilns and testing is that they cool so much more rapidly than a big kiln, so your glaze results may be different. To get around that, you need to be facile with the ramp hold programming so you can add slow cool segments to the end of the firing. As for the pilot light, that's just the little red light bulb on the side of the controller case that blinks on and off in tandem with when the elements are on.
  4. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Mark_H in Wiring question   
    Yes, most sparkies are responsible within their area of expertise and don't immediately recognize how different a kiln is from just a big hair dryer in the bathroom. And not being familiar with the Skutt et al websites where explicit specification are listed, they would look at the rating plate and do what seems normal for the numbers on the plate. It's the few who show up in a pottery group and insist that because they have a license they know what they are talking about and and it absolutely must be fused at the rating plate. As noted, most sparkies are responsible and will adjust their opinion (and work) when the strange nuance of 125% is shown to them, but every once in a while we get into arguments about it. I don't have a license, but I can read the code and from that understand why Skutt et al say what they say. Thanks for everybody's help and input,
  5. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Wiring question   
    Yes, most sparkies are responsible within their area of expertise and don't immediately recognize how different a kiln is from just a big hair dryer in the bathroom. And not being familiar with the Skutt et al websites where explicit specification are listed, they would look at the rating plate and do what seems normal for the numbers on the plate. It's the few who show up in a pottery group and insist that because they have a license they know what they are talking about and and it absolutely must be fused at the rating plate. As noted, most sparkies are responsible and will adjust their opinion (and work) when the strange nuance of 125% is shown to them, but every once in a while we get into arguments about it. I don't have a license, but I can read the code and from that understand why Skutt et al say what they say. Thanks for everybody's help and input,
  6. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from neilestrick in Wiring question   
    Yes, most sparkies are responsible within their area of expertise and don't immediately recognize how different a kiln is from just a big hair dryer in the bathroom. And not being familiar with the Skutt et al websites where explicit specification are listed, they would look at the rating plate and do what seems normal for the numbers on the plate. It's the few who show up in a pottery group and insist that because they have a license they know what they are talking about and and it absolutely must be fused at the rating plate. As noted, most sparkies are responsible and will adjust their opinion (and work) when the strange nuance of 125% is shown to them, but every once in a while we get into arguments about it. I don't have a license, but I can read the code and from that understand why Skutt et al say what they say. Thanks for everybody's help and input,
  7. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Wiring question   
    Thanks folks for all your input. The thing that is driving this question is a bit of a tif going on over in another pottery group. Somebody bought a new kiln and their regular household electrician refused to put a 60 amp breaker and wire on a 6-50 receptacle, insisted it had to be a 60 amp outlet or a 50 amp breaker. Another self-described "master electrician and hobby potter" opined that 50 amps is all that is needed. His defense against the continuous load requirement is that he has heard the relays in his kiln clicking so that makes it not a continuous load. As if the short pause, if any when coming into mid-fire or high-fire maturity, is enough for the cable to cool off... And what about manual kilns that are simply full on high for the last 6 or more hours of the firing? And the rest of it is just good common sense - listen to the kiln manufacturer and don't use the breaker as a convenient on-off switch. Anyway, on to the next battle.
  8. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Pres in New to ceramics   
    Oh my, you have a small problem there. As Pres notes, it is indeed a 120V kiln. It is rated to draw 16 amps, which requires a 20 amp circuit. The plug in your picture, however, has been improperly "altered." A 120V/20A circuit uses a NEMA 5-20 plug and receptacle in which the flat blades are not parallel. Your picture shows that the blade on the left side, which was supposed to be vertical, has been twisted to horizontal to match the blade on the right side. This changes it to a NEMA 6-15 configuration, which would be 240V and 15 amps if the matching receptacle is appropriately wired. Thus, if you are driving the originally specified 7.5 ohm elements at 240 volts, the kiln will be drawing 32 amps or twice the rated amount for the plug/ receptacle/ circuit wiring (and probably the kiln internal wiring too), and the kiln will be running at 4 times the designed wattage. If you change the circuit and its receptacle back to the originally specified 120V/20A (i.e., NEMA 5-20), you will need to cut that altered plug off and repair it with a proper 5-20P plug. Do not just rewire the existing incorrect receptacle and put a different breaker on the circuit. Plugs and receptacles have specific configurations of prongs and slots for each different combination of voltage/amperage, so if someone in the future sees a what appears to be a 6-15 receptacle on the wall with both slots horizontal, they should expect the voltage from it to be 240V and up to 15A of available current. Consequently, their device that has a matching plug would fail because the outlet is not providing the correct power. Always be sure plugs, receptacles, wires, and overcurrent protection (the breaker) properly match industry standards so that everything will work safely and correctly now for you and for a future user of that outlet.
    As for new elements, Euclids.com can provide elements for just about any kiln ever made.
  9. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from liambesaw in Evenly cutting extruded tubes?   
    I too use a woodworking miter box and a wire in an old hand jig saw. I have a piece of thin foam across the bottom so that the wire can push into the foam so as to cut cleanly all the way through the extrusion.
  10. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Katie Piro in Argh!! Giffin grip gripe, anyone else have issues?   
    An issue with the GG and a Shimpo wheel is that the mechanism of the GG is that counterclockwise torque (assuming a typical US counterclockwise wheel) on the base of the GG causes the inertia of the sliding top to press clockwise with respect to the base, which causes the arms to move inward on their spiral tracks. This is exactly the same as the initial tightening on the ware while putting it in the center. This keeps it gripped during the trimming. However,  the Shimpo wheel stops very quickly when you back off the pedal, much faster than other brands. As a consequence, the top of the GG tends to keep some of its counterclockwise momentum with respect to the now stopped base, which has the effect of very slightly loosening the arms. It is at that point where the ware moves off center, but you probably didn't notice it happening.
  11. Like
    Dick White reacted to Min in anyone know this very old, (1990s or before) glaze called "Surface Texture"?   
    Lacks silica, has boron far in excess of what is necessary at cone 6, sodium will be through the roof, flux ratio will be way off for a durable glaze, tin is crazy high, whole bunch of reasons this isn't a good choice for a functional glaze but I don't think the purpose of the recipe was to make a functional glaze. 
  12. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in anyone know this very old, (1990s or before) glaze called "Surface Texture"?   
    Could it be that the recipe is complete, just not completely written down?  Using the amounts in the 2500g batch, it would be ball clay - 30; borax - 50; and tin - 20. Back in the day (and even some now), folks wrote their recipes to total 100 including the colorants, opacifiers, and other additives. I can see how a wash of 50% borax would have just a slight gloss after fluxing the surface of the ceramic without adding much glass.
  13. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Roberta12 in Eutectics Calculator   
    Ha. For some, this glaze chem stuff IS wilderness camping. All. The. Time.
  14. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Babs in Eutectics Calculator   
    Ha. For some, this glaze chem stuff IS wilderness camping. All. The. Time.
  15. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Eutectics Calculator   
    Ha. For some, this glaze chem stuff IS wilderness camping. All. The. Time.
  16. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Chilly in Eutectics Calculator   
    Ha. For some, this glaze chem stuff IS wilderness camping. All. The. Time.
  17. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from dhPotter in Eutectics Calculator   
    Ha. For some, this glaze chem stuff IS wilderness camping. All. The. Time.
  18. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from DianaB in Looking for advice on used kiln-Diana   
    People who have a Skutt 181 seem to like them, though that model is long out of production. It will be a manual kiln with switches and a kiln sitter. While new kilns with a digital controller often have a price premium of ~$200 over the comparable manual model, the cost to add a standalone digital controller to a manual kiln is in the order of $6-800 depending on the features. $600 for this small one is a tad high but could be worth it if it includes shelves and posts.
  19. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Bill Kielb in New L & L kiln   
    This may be a bit geeky for the average artist, but with the Genesis controller, you can extract a data file for each of the last 10 firings that lists the setpoints, actual temperatures, and percent of power-on time every 30 seconds. Import that into a spreadsheet like Excel and calculate rates of temperature rise at various stages of the firing and for each section of the kiln. If you are facile with the spreadsheet, you can construct graphics of programmed vs. actual. Like I said, it's a geek's toy, but it can be useful to see where the variances are from expected in the programming and imbalances between the sections. This is particularly useful when elements begin to wear and the ramp rates at higher temperatures begin to significantly lag the program. You can see how the run up to bisque seems to be normal while glaze firings go on forever until the dreaded E1. I've also used this by setting a high ramp rate for a long cooling segment down from peak (set it to over 400F/hr) just to keep the controller from turning the elements on at all while logging the natural cooling rate of the kiln. I doubt you'll find a brand new kiln to be generally lagging the expected program, but it can help diagnose section imbalances that can be tweaked with a thermocouple offset.
  20. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Pres in Standing to throw   
    And, when throwing standing up, position the wheel so that when you are standing, your back is braced against something solid, like a wall or a support post. You will need to put some seat cushion foam on the wall to make pressing back against it more comfortable.
  21. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Roberta12 in Standing to throw   
    And, when throwing standing up, position the wheel so that when you are standing, your back is braced against something solid, like a wall or a support post. You will need to put some seat cushion foam on the wall to make pressing back against it more comfortable.
  22. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Geeks only - Raspberry PI controlled kiln   
    What I was trying to do was use my logging pyrometer connected to the same thermocouple as the controller to keep track of what the controller was seeing/doing. I attached a separate wire directly at the thermocouple block. When I noticed the readings bouncing around, I gave the thermocouple back to the controller rather than have the kiln load bolloxed.
  23. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from MarkTilles in Geeks only - Raspberry PI controlled kiln   
    What I was trying to do was use my logging pyrometer connected to the same thermocouple as the controller to keep track of what the controller was seeing/doing. I attached a separate wire directly at the thermocouple block. When I noticed the readings bouncing around, I gave the thermocouple back to the controller rather than have the kiln load bolloxed.
  24. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from neilestrick in Geeks only - Raspberry PI controlled kiln   
    As one wag said, anything is possible, but some things are not likely. My one attempt at that was not satisfactory. I connected a separate pyrometer to the same thermocouple as was being used by the kiln's Bartlett controller. The temperature readings went jittery and I couldn't tell what was going on. Haven't tried it since.
  25. Like
    Dick White got a reaction from MarkTilles in Geeks only - Raspberry PI controlled kiln   
    As one wag said, anything is possible, but some things are not likely. My one attempt at that was not satisfactory. I connected a separate pyrometer to the same thermocouple as was being used by the kiln's Bartlett controller. The temperature readings went jittery and I couldn't tell what was going on. Haven't tried it since.
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