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High Bridge Pottery

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  1. Like
    High Bridge Pottery reacted to neilestrick in Cone 9-10 Electric?   
    You won't gain anything by going to cone 10. The big difference between cone 6 and one 10 glazes is that most people who fire cone 10 fire in reduction, which you can't do in an electric. So you can't fire the 'classic' cone 10 glazes like shino and tenmoku and expect them to come out the same. Pretty much anything you can do in cone 10 oxidation you can do at cone 6. Firing to cone 10 will cut your element life and overall kiln life in half.
  2. Like
    High Bridge Pottery got a reaction from Chilly in The perils of using a .CO domain name   
    You can get some interesting domains now, I bought www.thepottery.store but I haven't worked out what to do with it yet.
  3. Like
    High Bridge Pottery reacted to C.Banks in Opinions on Val Cushing approach   
    Most copper reds require tin oxide.
    "Sn does a couple things. First it improves the solubility of Cu. Metals, per se, aren't really very soluble in glaze and if you can't get the metal dissolved, it can't very well be precipitated in any organized fashion. Second, on cooling, Cu tends to attract Sn atoms from the glaze. These atoms sort of "coat" the crystals as they are developed and thus serves to control their size by limiting the attachment of further Cu atoms to the crystal. This behavior is that of a protective colloid and it is of great advantage. Because if the crystals get big, the glaze turns "livery" looking, and the doughnut remains elusive. Third, to the extent that Sn has limited solubility in SiO2 or B2O3 based glassy material, it probably also serves to provide nuclei on which the coloring crystals can grow."
    A study of the mechanism behind the color in color red glazes by Karl Platt.
    Zinc is a bit of a wild card in reduction.
    "Zinc-containing glazes may be quite variable and unpredictable in reduction depending on how carefully you duplicate conditions firing to firing and how uniform the interior of your kiln is." John Hesselberth
     
  4. Like
    High Bridge Pottery got a reaction from Rae Reich in Gas burner question   
    I always found it easier to open the burners all the way and use the single regulator after the tank valve. Whatever you find works best for you is the best. 
  5. Like
    High Bridge Pottery got a reaction from Luitreth in Gas burner question   
    I always found it easier to open the burners all the way and use the single regulator after the tank valve. Whatever you find works best for you is the best. 
  6. Like
    High Bridge Pottery got a reaction from Bill Kielb in FTL Code on Paragon Kiln   
    Make sure it's not an FTL (Faster Than Light) code.
    In this forum, we obey the laws of quantum physics!

  7. Like
    High Bridge Pottery reacted to mnnaj in Gratitude and thanks   
    I've mostly been a lurker here.  I comment occasionally and read many of the posts.  
    I have been feeling very grateful for this community of people lately.  I have found answers without asking the questions.  And yes answers to questions I didn't know I had.  Some of the comments are way over my head - technical glazing and electricity posts come to mind.  I may not understand what you are posting, but I appreciate that each of you takes the time to share your knowledge with those of us who want to know.  I am very glad to have found this group of knowledgeable, agreeable and respectful people.  There are too many of you to name and I don't want to miss anyone.  I know if I see a particular avatar that I should read that post.  
    Thank you for your time and experience.  I hope that you all continue to contribute for many years and that I can continue to lurk, while avidly reading the posts.
    Nancy 
  8. Like
    High Bridge Pottery got a reaction from curt in Ian Currie Test Tiles Forums?   
    Where's ma test tile to look at! Don't leave us hanging 
  9. Like
    High Bridge Pottery reacted to Bill Kielb in Calcined Kaolin   
    Calcined Kaolin is in effect about 10% more concentrated than non calcined. So on that basis if the recipe calls for 100 grams of calcined that would equate to approximately 110% of non calcined. Calcining removes the chemically combined water but also remove some trace amounts of some minerals usually found in EPK. So the calcined version  of the recipe might be cleaner in some respect or fire with less imperfections. 
    As far as gloss, by chemistry something fired to its appropriate melting temperature will generally follow the silica to alumina gloss ratio. Therefore 5:1 (or less) silica to alumina in UMF should be matte if fired to its proper melting temperature. At approximately 7:1 the glaze will generally be glossy, again fired to its proper melting temperature.
    The catch, under fire something and it likely will appear matte, just not fully melted. Over fire it and it will run and potentially appear glossy and of course drippy. Slow cool something and you can force crystal growth in some recipes and they appear more matte.
    so what does this all have to do with your recipe? Likely using EPK  for calcined did not affect the gloss ratio much as probably not a bunch of change in silica to alumina ratio. Just approximately 10% less clay than the originator of the recipe  had designed it with.
    Why did they design it that way? They could have a great reason or maybe none. Many recipes were designed by adding and firing and looking and adding some more and firing. Not a bad thing just sometimes recipes contain all sorts of unnecessary components. Glaze calculators can be helpful in this regard.
    here is a quick video that may explain the gloss thing a bit easier
     
  10. Like
    High Bridge Pottery reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Ian Currie Test Tiles Forums?   
    Hey, fellow Currie peoples. I have 2 tiles going in tonight! Going to necro this beast of a thread! Probably won't be that much to look at, but it is my standard white glaze that I use on all my work. Adapting it to be slightly more matte and just to see if there is anything interesting with it.
    On a side note, this is the first time I am actually using my currie grid tiles from the foam slab roller (which I sold). So it was sort of depressing using these beautiful tiles that I made so easily, that I can't make anymore because I sold the slab roller because I never ended up using it. Hahaha. 
    Has anyone been doing any more testing?
  11. Like
    High Bridge Pottery reacted to liambesaw in Is this a stupid idea?   
    You'd think a toilet company would fire to cone 2 
  12. Like
    High Bridge Pottery reacted to TerryBerry in Relay clicks rapidly then melts   
    @Bill Kielb @neilestrick @High Bridge Pottery @liambesaw and @Mark C. 
    Thank you all for the advice! I actually got it working!
    I ended up disconnecting everything, testing the controllers, relay, even the continuity of the wires. Everything seemed to be in order, so I put it back together using the wiring diagram.  I also switched back to the original relay (since the new one had melted). And... magically it started working.
    My best guess is that a wire was crossed somewhere or a connection was loose to begin with, and then the new relay wasn't a perfect match. Magnecraft no longer makes that exact relay, and it looks like the new one I bought from Schneider Electric was a little off in the percise specs (even though it was listed as a replacement for the older relay). 
    At any rate it's humming right along now!  I just need to do some test firings and read up on kiln wash and all the maintenance I need to do to keep it in tip top shape. 
    I really appreciate your help. Without it I'd probably still be staring helplessly at a partially disassembled kiln!  
     
  13. Like
    High Bridge Pottery reacted to Bill Kielb in Relay clicks rapidly then melts   
    It looks like later in life they got rid of the timers in favor of infinite switches. In the manual mode the 4300 timer is jumped out and the 4600 timer controls the double pole relay and top element be way of the relay. The 4600 timer  powers the double pole relay which disconnects power to the elements. Yes, you heard me right, disconnects. This relay has a high voltage primary and when Off provides power to the infinite switch and bottom elements, sort of. 
    so no idea of what the sequence of operation of this was but scanning through their later models all of the timer and relays were replaced with simple infinite switches and pilot indicators (hooked to the “P” terminal). The manual and automatic switch seems to have gone away as well.
    my best idea, talk to the Paragon guys and likely replace most of this mess with an infinite switch for the bottom elements.
  14. Like
    High Bridge Pottery got a reaction from Chilly in RETRO FITTING A KILN SITTER?   
    That's a shame, hope you manage to find something suitable soon. I always found those kilns are the only cheapish small second hand kilns sold. The rest seem to be big front loaders from schools etc. Unless the big kilns are in great condition and you have the right electricity supply it's not even worth taking them away for free.  £250 plus a 400 mile trip is about the maximum that kiln was worth without knowing how good the electrics really are. 
  15. Like
    High Bridge Pottery got a reaction from Chilly in RETRO FITTING A KILN SITTER?   
    It looks like a slightly bigger model to mine but I think the floors have metal underneath and wheels on the bottom. At least that's how mine is.
    Probably a little more than 13amp too as the description says use oven socket.
    The lids are not great on these kilns.
    If the electrics are good and the kiln sitter and elements work it's a bargain for something to get you back into the game. Even just for the brick structure I would buy it if I was closer and had space for it.
     
    Turns out it's only an 8 hour round trip  hmmm  I will control my hoarding instincts. 
  16. Like
    High Bridge Pottery reacted to JDP in RETRO FITTING A KILN SITTER?   
    Found the link - THANK YOU - Buy now is £250, so I will keep an eye on the auction today. You are a start High Bridge, thank you very much
  17. Like
    High Bridge Pottery got a reaction from Rae Reich in RETRO FITTING A KILN SITTER?   
    It looks like a slightly bigger model to mine but I think the floors have metal underneath and wheels on the bottom. At least that's how mine is.
    Probably a little more than 13amp too as the description says use oven socket.
    The lids are not great on these kilns.
    If the electrics are good and the kiln sitter and elements work it's a bargain for something to get you back into the game. Even just for the brick structure I would buy it if I was closer and had space for it.
     
    Turns out it's only an 8 hour round trip  hmmm  I will control my hoarding instincts. 
  18. Like
    High Bridge Pottery got a reaction from liambesaw in RETRO FITTING A KILN SITTER?   
    The one in the ebay link is in the south-east. Looks ok for £100
  19. Like
    High Bridge Pottery got a reaction from JDP in RETRO FITTING A KILN SITTER?   
    Not sure if it is going to go much over 1000 but see if you get a response, weird that there is no temperature on the nameplate but when glass and enamel are involved they are usually lower temps. What sort of work are you looking to fire? Cone6 pottery?
  20. Like
    High Bridge Pottery got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Insight Live Heads Up   
    Before I saw a stull chart anything around 8:1 ratio was a good gloss. To me the stull chart is showing the same thing, silica compared to alumina. Lots and lots of tests is the best way to design/alter.
  21. Like
    High Bridge Pottery got a reaction from Rae Reich in Best practise for making slabs to jigger plates?   
    Where I work they just have a machine that slices clay from the pug mill slugs and that gets put straight onto the mould.
     
  22. Like
    High Bridge Pottery reacted to liambesaw in Electric quote seem fair?   
    I have decided to do it myself with some guidance from Bill here and the NEC.  Doing the higher bidded work (run conduit under the house) and saving a bucket.  Parts and permit 300 dollars.
  23. Like
    High Bridge Pottery reacted to jbruce in Geeks only - Raspberry PI controlled kiln   
    I think a cooled solid state relay will have long life.  Wear and tear on SSRs is mainly from heating (expansion) / cooling (contraction) of the components in the package.
    The increasing amplitude of the waveform as your kiln gets hotter is due to cooling because of the 60s cycle time.  A faster cycle time would be harder on your mechanical relays, but would yield more accurate ramps / soaks.
     
    WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING !!!
    running a kiln in an enclosed space is extremely dangerous.  some fumes are noxious. please dont. running a kiln within 8 feet of anything flammable is extremely dangerous.  please dont. WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING !!! WARNING !!!
     
    This is the pot calling the kettle black (because I made some mistakes too), but the best thing you could do if you choose to run this in its current location & state is to automate a call to 911 when it starts. :-)
  24. Like
    High Bridge Pottery got a reaction from Chilly in Geeks only - Raspberry PI controlled kiln   
    As eminem says, do exactly as I don't.
  25. Like
    High Bridge Pottery reacted to jbruce in Geeks only - Raspberry PI controlled kiln   
    @liambesaw Here is the pic I promised.

    Input is a nema male plug with three conductors (2 hot, 1 neutral).  I used an old extension cord for this to make sure it could handle the current.  Turns out it could handle about 4 times the 40A current max, so lots of safety margin there (and free wire). One hot leg is switched by the SSR, everything else runs straight to the output on the right hand side where the female nema plug is mounted.  The RPI is in a plastic case and is covered by a breadboard with all the spaghetti wiring.  You can see the max31855 in there. The thermocouple is the red/yellow wire.  The rpi connects to the control side of the ssr.  There is also power for the rpi (that black cable coming out the square hole in the front).
    That big square hole is from a previous incarnation of the controller that used a PID controller purchased from a company.
    Note the BIG heatsink with thermal paste and the BIG aluminum box.  If you want your SSR to survive, keep it cool.  There will be times where the SSR is on 100% of the time and that will generate significant heat.
     
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