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Rebekah Krieger

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  1. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from kristinanoel in Question about alternative finishes for ceramics & acceptance by ceramic artists   
    Not properly firing a clay piece is poor craftsmanship. I may get slammed for making a solid statement (few people are comfortable enough to do so these days)  but under firing a clay body further supports the comments that say  it’s not ceramics. Which actually does tie into the question of alternative cold surfaces being rejected by the ceramic world. 
     
    also, I see more contradictions about risk taking. 
    Further , to the point of “we have seen what glazes can do” .... all I know is I walk into an art museum and I have hundreds of examples of what paint can do also. 

    I am by *no means* an expert, I’m in the thick of learning and I have more failed pots than successful ones at this point. But also not coming into a group with many experts and  arguing why they may be wrong. 
    Perhaps the question was asked by you so you could prove your point rather than listen to the answers. 
    Don’t take it as an insult on your work. Your pieces look very nice.  

     
     
     
  2. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to Mark C. in Question about alternative finishes for ceramics & acceptance by ceramic artists   
    Being rejected I feel is a strengthening process. I got rejected a lot from art shows for decades. Just part of the whole process. Never took it personally. Nowadays I do not jury in much as I'm either invited to shows or they always let me (through the jury process) in as I never sweat it. Of course i have not done a New show in over 20 years. could be more like 30 years now If I thought about it.I have the degree but thats never done anything for me other than the knowledge I gained getting it. My focus was 110% ceramics for my 5 collage years and the paper was meaningless.. The knowledge was everything
  3. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from shawnhar in Do pots grow on you?   
    Just the opposite for me! Hahaha 
    I think I have a nice pot and a couple months later it gets aggressively thrown into the trash (hard enough to break it) While cleaning my studio I often think “why the hell did I save that on the “sell” shelf”. 
     
     
  4. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Hulk in Do pots grow on you?   
    Just the opposite for me! Hahaha 
    I think I have a nice pot and a couple months later it gets aggressively thrown into the trash (hard enough to break it) While cleaning my studio I often think “why the hell did I save that on the “sell” shelf”. 
     
     
  5. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Do pots grow on you?   
    Just the opposite for me! Hahaha 
    I think I have a nice pot and a couple months later it gets aggressively thrown into the trash (hard enough to break it) While cleaning my studio I often think “why the hell did I save that on the “sell” shelf”. 
     
     
  6. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in A total newb question about trimming ....   
    Yeah, if you’ve got a drastic taper, you’re better off avoiding trimming where possible. A neatly rolled foot can give a vase a subtle lift, and is less time consuming. But if you have to trim them:
    One thing that is less widely taught about bisque chucks than it should be is that you have to soak the chuck before using it. Otherwise, it absorbs water from the clay wads, and makes them shrink and loosen, which I think might be what you’ve observed. Dunk it in a bucket for 10 minutes before trimming and pat it dry.
  7. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from JohnnyK in Why make functional ware?   
    Sorry to revive an old topic. 
     
    But my 17 yr old daughter said something to me the other day when I received a mug in the mail that I purchased from another potter. 

    She said “pottery is so neat because it’s cool that you can just easily get a piece of art made by someone who’s art you like and actually hold it and use it. It’s not just something hanging up, you can actually use it and touch it”.  
    We are so fortunate to be able to express through functional pieces. Many artists have only the viewers  eyes to communicate. We have their eyes, their hands, and sometimes even their mouths. It doesn’t get more intimate than that. (Shhh... don’t go there..., I know what you are thinking but that’s not the point) haha 
  8. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to GEP in Question about alternative finishes for ceramics & acceptance by ceramic artists   
    Several people have offered the answer “no the painted surfaces are not ceramics” but you won’t take that for answer. And you defend your position by arguing an “art” defense but not providing a “ceramics” defense.  That’s why it doesn’t seem like you understand that these are two different questions. 
  9. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to GEP in Question about alternative finishes for ceramics & acceptance by ceramic artists   
    @itsALLart, you came here and asked the question “is this ceramics?” but what you you really meant is “is this art?” You don’t seem to understand the difference.
    When you are making art for your own personal exploration/growth/satisfaction then it doesn’t matter if you call it ceramics or not. However, if you are trying to enter professional venues with your work, the standards and definitions DO matter. Just like with any other professional field. 
  10. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to Babs in Oxide washes on top of glazes! Oh my!   
    Check out Greg Daly, Linda Arbuckle, John Britt and a few others.
    Majolica work.
    On glaze decorators.
    The glaze itself can alter greatly your results.
    Initially put your washes on top third of
    your vertical surfaces..runming glazes not much fun on shelves of kiln.
    Lots of fun ahead!!
  11. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from andryea in supporting work at ^6   
    I wouldn’t. Unless your supports were made of the same clay so the shrinkage rates were the same. The last thing you need is a support that doesn’t shrink and you develop a crack from it Shrinking onto a support. 
     
  12. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Min in Question about alternative finishes for ceramics & acceptance by ceramic artists   
    Your comments seem a bit contradictory.
    One can’t expect ceramic artists who spent years and years formulating glazes and evaluating how they respond to their other glazes when fired, and wasting entire kiln loads because of little changes like too much /not enough water or a new batch/mine of a material that chances the outcome to be comfortable with statements such as “I could just throw some commercial glaze on it” and then say “I do it for control”. 
    The ceramic artist that did spend years and opened many kiln loads that needed to be trashed might not be comfortable with somebody who may appear to be pushing their work off as the same category when in their mind, they may think “I could have just thrown some paint on it” and “fire off and re paint my failed paintings when they fail” 
    The truth is, both are art, but the process is entirely different just as the heartache may be entirely different. And functional pots don’t always necessarily mean somebody produced 20 in a day and slapped some commercial glaze on it. I think the best way to come to some acceptance in the ceramics industry is to understand the process and then explain yours without belittling the very group that has been pushed out of art galleries and art shows for being “folk craft” (due to uneducated jurors) .
    hope that gives you some perspective  
  13. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Question about alternative finishes for ceramics & acceptance by ceramic artists   
    Your comments seem a bit contradictory.
    One can’t expect ceramic artists who spent years and years formulating glazes and evaluating how they respond to their other glazes when fired, and wasting entire kiln loads because of little changes like too much /not enough water or a new batch/mine of a material that chances the outcome to be comfortable with statements such as “I could just throw some commercial glaze on it” and then say “I do it for control”. 
    The ceramic artist that did spend years and opened many kiln loads that needed to be trashed might not be comfortable with somebody who may appear to be pushing their work off as the same category when in their mind, they may think “I could have just thrown some paint on it” and “fire off and re paint my failed paintings when they fail” 
    The truth is, both are art, but the process is entirely different just as the heartache may be entirely different. And functional pots don’t always necessarily mean somebody produced 20 in a day and slapped some commercial glaze on it. I think the best way to come to some acceptance in the ceramics industry is to understand the process and then explain yours without belittling the very group that has been pushed out of art galleries and art shows for being “folk craft” (due to uneducated jurors) .
    hope that gives you some perspective  
  14. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from GEP in Question about alternative finishes for ceramics & acceptance by ceramic artists   
    Your comments seem a bit contradictory.
    One can’t expect ceramic artists who spent years and years formulating glazes and evaluating how they respond to their other glazes when fired, and wasting entire kiln loads because of little changes like too much /not enough water or a new batch/mine of a material that chances the outcome to be comfortable with statements such as “I could just throw some commercial glaze on it” and then say “I do it for control”. 
    The ceramic artist that did spend years and opened many kiln loads that needed to be trashed might not be comfortable with somebody who may appear to be pushing their work off as the same category when in their mind, they may think “I could have just thrown some paint on it” and “fire off and re paint my failed paintings when they fail” 
    The truth is, both are art, but the process is entirely different just as the heartache may be entirely different. And functional pots don’t always necessarily mean somebody produced 20 in a day and slapped some commercial glaze on it. I think the best way to come to some acceptance in the ceramics industry is to understand the process and then explain yours without belittling the very group that has been pushed out of art galleries and art shows for being “folk craft” (due to uneducated jurors) .
    hope that gives you some perspective  
  15. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to liambesaw in Question about alternative finishes for ceramics & acceptance by ceramic artists   
    I spend 3 weeks on a piece and use ceramic decoration.  I also make 20 mugs in a day.  Some are art, some are functional.  A lot never make it out of my studio.  A lot get the end of a hammer.  I've had kiln loads, hundreds and hundreds of hours of work, just not end up right at all.  
    The risk involved is part of the value.  The hours of work are always there, art or functional work.  A person doesn't buy an artisan mug because they need a vessel to drink from.  They buy it for the same reason someone buys one of your sculptures.  IKEA sells mugs for 3 dollars, and they work and look good.  
    I don't see any problem with cold finish on ceramics, but there is a plethora of reasons why a gallery or juror may not be interested.  I've had my functional pottery rejected, I've had my art pottery rejected, it's just part of the process when you open it up to someone else judging/jurying your work.
     
  16. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from liambesaw in Question about alternative finishes for ceramics & acceptance by ceramic artists   
    Your comments seem a bit contradictory.
    One can’t expect ceramic artists who spent years and years formulating glazes and evaluating how they respond to their other glazes when fired, and wasting entire kiln loads because of little changes like too much /not enough water or a new batch/mine of a material that chances the outcome to be comfortable with statements such as “I could just throw some commercial glaze on it” and then say “I do it for control”. 
    The ceramic artist that did spend years and opened many kiln loads that needed to be trashed might not be comfortable with somebody who may appear to be pushing their work off as the same category when in their mind, they may think “I could have just thrown some paint on it” and “fire off and re paint my failed paintings when they fail” 
    The truth is, both are art, but the process is entirely different just as the heartache may be entirely different. And functional pots don’t always necessarily mean somebody produced 20 in a day and slapped some commercial glaze on it. I think the best way to come to some acceptance in the ceramics industry is to understand the process and then explain yours without belittling the very group that has been pushed out of art galleries and art shows for being “folk craft” (due to uneducated jurors) .
    hope that gives you some perspective  
  17. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Question about alternative finishes for ceramics & acceptance by ceramic artists   
    Your comments seem a bit contradictory.
    One can’t expect ceramic artists who spent years and years formulating glazes and evaluating how they respond to their other glazes when fired, and wasting entire kiln loads because of little changes like too much /not enough water or a new batch/mine of a material that chances the outcome to be comfortable with statements such as “I could just throw some commercial glaze on it” and then say “I do it for control”. 
    The ceramic artist that did spend years and opened many kiln loads that needed to be trashed might not be comfortable with somebody who may appear to be pushing their work off as the same category when in their mind, they may think “I could have just thrown some paint on it” and “fire off and re paint my failed paintings when they fail” 
    The truth is, both are art, but the process is entirely different just as the heartache may be entirely different. And functional pots don’t always necessarily mean somebody produced 20 in a day and slapped some commercial glaze on it. I think the best way to come to some acceptance in the ceramics industry is to understand the process and then explain yours without belittling the very group that has been pushed out of art galleries and art shows for being “folk craft” (due to uneducated jurors) .
    hope that gives you some perspective  
  18. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to Min in Grey faux celadon mid range   
    Have a look at the colourants used in this glaze.  Base glaze looks underfired but if you used those colourants in a well fitting clear it might be somewhere to start. Ceramic stains are great but they can lack the depth that using straight oxides can give. If it's too blue then I'ld try it without the cobalt. I'ld also swap out the iron chromate for chrome oxide + iron oxide so it's safer for you to use. (using the ratio of 70 chrome oxide with 30 iron oxide) Or just skip the iron and use 0.28 chrome oxide in the linked recipe.
  19. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to Bill Kielb in Question about alternative finishes for ceramics & acceptance by ceramic artists   
    It seems a perception thing really so convincing some that it isn’t easier than creating the same look using traditional ceramics materials is going to be an uphill battle in many cases with plenty of points and counterpoints. Your work looks good, you choose to express your art in that manner -all good actually, in my view.
  20. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to Mark C. in Should I sell a mug that may not be fully vitrified?   
    They are you your learning mistakes and should not be sold
    those pots are problem children for the future-keep them or distroy them but do not sell them
  21. Like
    Rebekah Krieger reacted to liambesaw in What’s on your workbench?   
    Depends on my mood.  Pottery... It's a helluva drug 
  22. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Denice in What’s on your workbench?   
    working on some handle attachments. I prefer pulling off the pot, but this shape wanted a pulled and attached handle. 
  23. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Hulk in What’s on your workbench?   
    working on some handle attachments. I prefer pulling off the pot, but this shape wanted a pulled and attached handle. 
  24. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from oldlady in What’s on your workbench?   
    working on some handle attachments. I prefer pulling off the pot, but this shape wanted a pulled and attached handle. 
  25. Like
    Rebekah Krieger got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in What’s on your workbench?   
    working on some handle attachments. I prefer pulling off the pot, but this shape wanted a pulled and attached handle. 
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