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Jessica Knapp

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  1. excellent info and resource!!! The Laser printer decal printer is really a nice option especially for color! Thanks Paula. Marcia Please note that the laser printing option above is non-fired. From the Papilio site: "Ceramic Plates: The PAS paper is to make NON fired decals only. Porcelain plates decorated with PAS-decal can make a beautiful wall hanging but cannot be used as food bearing plates. This type of decal is not permanent in the same way as over the glaze fired porcelain or china paint decals. See important information on how to place decal on plates below on this page. Porcelain/ceramic Mugs: The PAS paper can be used to make a non-fired decal to decorate mugs. Please keep in mind that this is not a permanent decoration like fired porcelain colors. Mugs can be hand washed in warm water using nonabrasive soap. This type of decal is quite durable if not scratched with sharp objects. A mug with this type of decal is NOT dishwasher safe. It can survive the washing cycle of a dishwasher one or two times, but then the whole decal may come off. "
  2. Hi Spring, You are welcome to submit the same piece you sent last year. I would encourage you to submit new work as well, if you can, so we have a wide variety to choose from. For the description of work, we want the title, dimensions, materials used, firing temperature, and date the piece was completed. Hope that helps. Jessica
  3. You might also check the Ceramic Arts Daily Education page. There are some project ideas at the top left, split out by grade level, as well as a number of resources that you might be able to use in your high school program. http://ceramicartsdaily.org/education/ and the resources page, which is in the middle on the second row of the main education page: http://ceramicartsdaily.org/education/instructor-and-student-resources/
  4. Deleted this person's post about laser lights.

  5. The July/August 2012 issue of Pottery Making Illustrated includes an Instructors File article by Claire O'Connor on classroom strategies that work when teaching ceramics to adult students (post college). We want to extend the conversation beyond the magazine, so, if you're a teacher who works with adults, or you're an adult who is taking ceramics classes, please share your ideas on what has worked best for you when teaching/ learning about techniques, aesthetics, and how to convey your ideas in clay by posting them in this thread.
  6. Hi Jan and George, Just wanted to let you know that you can also post your event on the Ceramics Monthly online calendar page by filling out the form at the link below. Just choose your category, and fill in the rest. The listing will then appear online by the next day at the latest. http://cmcalendar.ceramicartsdaily.org/submit/ Good luck with the exhibition!
  7. Paperino, You could also try this ceramic ink transfer technique, also with photocopies, demonstrated by Kristina Bogdanov on one of CAD's videos: http://ceramicartsdaily.org/ceramic-supplies/ceramic-colorants-ceramic-supplies-2/photo-lithography-on-clay-a-surprisingly-simple-way-to-print-images-on-clay/ Jessica Hi Jessica, Thank you for the helpful tips. I think this is getting close to what I am looking for. I will look at the link and see if I can find some help. I know I can transfer text directly onto the ceramics without having to use undergalzes; but I will most definitively try your technique.
  8. You could also try a photocopy transfer technique on leather-hard clay. Make a high contrast mirrored image photocopy (so the text is reversed). The photocopy should be white text on a black ground, so you may have to invert the colors. Most photocopiers can do this. Once you have a photocopy that is white text on a black ground, you can paint any color of underglaze you want to use into the white areas. The black areas will repel it, as the photocopier toner contains plastic that's fused to the paper. These sheets can be used once the underglaze loses its sheen, or can be dried and stored for use later. If storing for later use, you'll just need to spritz water over the paper surface and over the leather-hard clay surface you're transferring the text to. After rewetting the paper, either by spritzing or by quickly dunking into a bucket of water and allowing the excess water to drip off, gently place the paper on the clay, then smooth it out using a rubber rib. Once smoothed on, give it a minute or two, then gently peel away the paper. Excess can be removed using an X-Acto knife. Don't use really thin copy paper, it is hard to remove. The underglaze will be permanent once fired. Note: As you're not glazing it won't be shiny and may not be durable enough for outdoor installation. This technique is demonstrated on the upcoming CAD video by Erin Furimsky. There's not a clip of this particular technique, but there's a clip of some of her other techniques available for previewing: http://ceramicartsdaily.org/pottery-making-techniques/ceramic-decorating-techniques/pottery-video-of-the-week-combining-stamped-underglaze-decoration-with-shellac-resist-to-create-gorgeous-layered-surfaces/ Another possibility might be to have a stamp made of the text, again, applied to the clay at the leather-hard stage (see the video clip above). Good luck, Jessica
  9. Hi Spring, in the event that your work is chosen for the Undergraduate Showcase, you will be contacted for the dimensions of the work before the issue goes to press. Good luck! Jessica I sent in every thing needed and on time but I just realized I never put the dimensions of each piece. Will that disqualify me? Thanks PS Kinda havin' a heart attack!
  10. Graduate students take note: Applications must be postmarked on or before Saturday, May 21, 2011 The Clay Studio will host The Eighth Annual Marge Brown Kalodner Graduate Student Exhibition from June 24 through July 24, 2011. It is open to any student currently enrolled in a Graduate Program or graduating from a Graduate Program in 2011. Works may be mixed media, but clay must be the primary medium. We encourage submissions from artists working in all types of and approaches to clay, as our primary goal is to represent the exciting diversity within this medium. The premise for this exhibition is to identify young artists whose work is deserving of attention, to provide a forum for both the exhibition and sale of their work, and to introduce the ceramics community to this next generation of talented individuals. Three cash prizes in the amounts of $1000.00, $500.00, and $250.00 will be awarded. http://www.theclaystudio.org/artist/kalodner.php
  11. Hi Evelyne, You might also want to check out Greenwich House Pottery. They always have excellent exhibitions. For other ceramic related options while you're in New York, browse the Ceramics Monthly Calendar. You can search for just events going on in New York. http://cmcalendar.ceramicartsdaily.org/ Have a great trip! Jessica
  12. Hi Tyler, If you have a few bodies of work that you feel are equally strong, feel free to send examples of all of them (within the parameters set up in the prospectus). We are looking for the applicants to send what they feel to be the most resolved pieces they have made, both technically and conceptually. These can be utilitarian or sculptural.
  13. The May 2011 issue of Ceramics Monthly, which showcases the winners of our Emerging Artist contest, was sent out a few weeks ago. We also have an online, People's Choice contest, where you all can vote on your favorite emerging artist from the group. Check it out here: http://ceramicartsdaily.org/contests/2011-emerging-ceramic-artist-contest-vote-for-your-favorite/ Be sure to vote by tomorrow, Friday May 6! The winner will receive a $500 gift card to Bailey Ceramic Supplies, who has graciously sponsored the contest on Ceramic Arts Daily.
  14. Hi Spring, As the editorial staff looks at printed images only, a video cannot be submitted. I would suggest that you submit printed stills from the video. Good luck, Jessica
  15. In the September 2011 issue, Ceramics Monthly will feature the works of undergraduate clay artists. Anyone enrolled in clay classes at an accredited post-secondary institution may apply. In an effort to keep the quality and variety at a high level, we ask you to encourage the undergraduate artists whom you know to apply. To be considered, they will need to submit the following to arrive in our offices by June 30, 2011: • Up to five professional-quality digital images (300 ppi resolution on CD) • A full-size color print of each image. Images should print to at least five (5) inches in the smallest dimensions; because accepted entries are printed, larger is better. • Complete descriptions of the works on a caption sheet • Full contact information • 500 words discussing the body of work you are submitting • Instructor name(s) and contact information • Institution at which you study Submissions can be mailed to: Undergraduate Showcase, Ceramics Monthly, 600 N. Cleveland Ave., Suite 210, Westerville, OH 43082. Arrival Deadline: The deadline to apply is June 30 (this is an arrival deadline, not a postmark deadline). Download the full prospectus at: http://media.ceramic...rgrad11full.pdf Emailed submissions and submissions with more than five images will not be considered. We ask that you do not submit materials in binders or folders. Submitted materials will not be returned. Due to the volume of entries, please do not respond to this email and no phone calls please.
  16. In the September 2011 issue, Ceramics Monthly will feature the works of undergraduate clay artists. Anyone enrolled in clay classes at an accredited post-secondary institution may apply. In an effort to keep the quality and variety at a high level, we ask you to encourage the undergraduate artists whom you know to apply. To be considered, they will need to submit the following to arrive in our offices by June 30, 2011: • Up to five professional-quality digital images (300 ppi resolution on CD)¶ • A full-size color print of each image. Images should print to at least five (5) inches in the smallest dimensions; because accepted entries are printed, larger is better. • Complete descriptions of the works on a caption sheet • Full contact information • 500 words discussing the body of work you are submitting • Instructor name(s) and contact information • Institution at which you study Submissions can be mailed to: Undergraduate Showcase, Ceramics Monthly, 600 N. Cleveland Ave., Suite 210, Westerville, OH 43082. Arrival Deadline: The deadline to apply is June 30 (this is an arrival deadline, not a postmark deadline). Download the full prospectus at: http://media.ceramic...rgrad11full.pdf Emailed submissions and submissions with more than five images will not be considered. We ask that you do not submit materials in binders or folders. Submitted materials will not be returned. Due to the volume of entries, please do not respond to this email and no phone calls please.
  17. Stephen's is a good point. I did a post bac year myself and would recommend it. If you want more information on this route, David Katz, a former post bac at UMass Dartmouth wrote about his experience in the February issue of Ceramics Monthly. As it relates to education, it has been posted in the education section of Ceramic Arts Daily: http://ceramicartsdaily.org/education/the-other-option-post-baccalaureate-certificate/ Hope this helps. Jessica I wouldn't mind teaching in a public school or something of that nature but all the jobs i saw wanted experience in a college setting. Would teaching at an arts center or something of that nature be considered applicable experience? or even teaching ceramics at a high school level? Good points Meisie. One other way many students who do not have a cohesive portfolio for grad school obtain one is through this focus and attending a post bac program or attending workshops at craft schools such as Arrowmont, Penland, Haystack, Appalachian Center for Crafts..... In this direction the student learns from a focused internationally known teacher! Not a bad way to get moving very quickly if your work ethic is strong and your personal goals are set with a constant organized schedule of research towards a conceptual concern.
  18. The Ceramics Monthly article on rare earth elements used as colorants was written by David Pier and appeared in the September 2002 issue of the magazine, pp. 65-67. I'd suggest doing test batches with transparent, translucent and opaque glaze bases that you like using already, doing a line blend to figure out the percentage needed to get the color you want. Best, Jessica
  19. Hi Donna, The post that Chris is referring to is on the work of Lauren Sandler. You can find it here: http://ceramicartsda...f-unfired-clay/ It is also part of the free download Three Great Handbuilding Techniques, available here: http://ceramicartsda...d-slab-methods/ If you're worried about plaster contaminating your clay, using these bone dry molds, or using bisque molds as Marcia suggests, could be the best solution. If the weight of the plaster molds is the problem, the next issue of Pottery Making Illustrated (March April) will have an article by Jonathan Kaplan on using blue foam (the stuff used for house insulation) to make slump/ hump molds. These molds weigh a lot less than traditional plaster molds. Jessica
  20. If you're using a MAC instead of a PC, your best bet for database software is FileMaker Pro. Microsoft doesn't make Access for Macs any longer. In Filemaker, there are set templates that can help you do all of the things you list below, and it can easily set up relational databases, one for contacts, one for sales/ invoices, one for inventory etc. Photos can be included, labels, letters, invoices and other reports can be generated. If you go with Filemaker, I'd recommend you buy a book, too. This helps you to understand ideas like relational databases and how to set them up properly. It is easy to do once you understand the concepts, but the concepts themselves are a bit abstract unless you've worked with a lot of databases in the past. I used "Filemaker Pro The Missing Manual". If you don't want to buy a book, there are several good forums online that will likely have answers to all of your questions in their archived posts/ threads. http://www.fmforums.com/ http://www.filemaker.com/support/forum_selection.html http://filemakertoday.com/com/forum.php Jessica There may well be and there a re some very knowledgeable people on this site who may use such a program. I've always used a database starting with dBase in the 1980's to Microsoft's Excel today with a few segues in between. I do much of my work with database programs because they are so easy to customize for my needs. I use one for my glaze formulas and another for my stock tracking and completed inventory and another for my advertising. Most custom programs I have seen utilize a database as the model for the program anyway. You can even do complex calculations with databases, it may not show but I really LIKE databases! Best regards, Charles
  21. Bellonart, I can recommend a school in Buckinghamshire, Buckinghamshire Chilterns University College http://www.bcuc.ac.uk/ and of course the Royal College of Art http://www.rca.ac.uk/. Professors I had in school have taught art at Camberwell College, which is part of the University of the Arts London www.camberwell.arts.ac.uk/ Check their websites to see if the programs would help you in making progress with your own research and the type of work you are interested in doing. Hope this is helpful. Jessica
  22. There's a good historical fiction account of the European race to find the secret formula to make porcelain, written by Janet Gleeson. The title is "The Arcanum: The Extraordinary True Story" and it is a quick, action packed read full of mystery, kidnappings and intrigue. I found it interesting, not only because of the human drama, but also as the field of alchemy, predecessor to chemistry, was also discussed/ described, and it was interesting to read about early scientists struggling with the difference between what they thought or hoped was possible, and what the empirical evidence was telling them (regarding the creation of gold). http://www.amazon.com/Arcanum-Extraordinary-True-Story/dp/0446674842/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_2
  23. Hi Katrien, I think this might be what you're experiencing. When a stoneware is bisque fired, it is pink. When it is high fired in a reduction atmosphere (in a gas kiln where the environment inside the kiln is starved of oxygen) many light colored or buff stoneware clay bodies will come out as a gray color with darker speckles under a clear glaze and a brown to brownish gray on unglazed areas. In an oxidation atmosphere (plenty of oxygen present) the clay will be a buff color, and look yellowish under a clear glaze. It really depends on your clay. If I'm right in guessing that the pink color you see is at the bisque stage when you're applying glaze, and that you're firing the work in a gas kiln, the solution might not lie in getting a different glaze. It might be to simply use a white slip on your clay, covering the entire piece with it when it is leather hard, then after the first (bisque) firing, you can glaze it with the shop clear/ gloss glaze. If you want the clay to look pink, you could add mason stains to the slip. Do tests as some colors burn out at mid to high fire ranges.
  24. There are a few good recipes on Ceramic Arts Daily. Joan Carcia's recipe is here: http://ceramicartsdaily.org/methods-techniques/ceramic-decorating-techniques/joan-carcias-terra-sigillata-recipe/ Sumi von Dassow talks about her recipe in her video clip on the burnishing process here: http://ceramicartsdaily.org/firing-techniques/how-to-mix-and-apply-terra-sigillata-for-burnishing-pottery/ For an unexpected color to the terra sigillata, check out Anne Fløche's recipe here: http://ceramicartsdaily.org/pottery-making-techniques/ceramic-decorating-techniques/inspired-by-terra-sigillata-a-new-twist-on-an-ancient-surface-technique/ Hope one of these is helpful to you. Jessica
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