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JohnnyK

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  1. Like
    JohnnyK got a reaction from Shelly M in Glaze Fire Closed Forms   
    The way I see it, Shelly, one of three things may happen. 1: nothing, the piece will be fine. 2: the glaze will melt and the expanding air in the piece will blow it out of the hole, venting the piece. 3: the piece will explode. If the piece is that important to you , I would guess as to the place you think the hole might be and clean the glaze off to reveal the hole, put a toothpick or whatever fits in  the hole, reglaze, unplug the hole and fire. How are you supporting the piece to keep the glaze off the kiln shelf when you fire it?
  2. Like
    JohnnyK got a reaction from PeterH in Glaze Fire Closed Forms   
    The way I see it, Shelly, one of three things may happen. 1: nothing, the piece will be fine. 2: the glaze will melt and the expanding air in the piece will blow it out of the hole, venting the piece. 3: the piece will explode. If the piece is that important to you , I would guess as to the place you think the hole might be and clean the glaze off to reveal the hole, put a toothpick or whatever fits in  the hole, reglaze, unplug the hole and fire. How are you supporting the piece to keep the glaze off the kiln shelf when you fire it?
  3. Like
    JohnnyK reacted to Hulk in Smoothing Uneven Surface On Greenware   
    While still chucked up for trimming, try moistening the turning piece with a damp sponge, give it a while, then burnish with a metal rib. 
  4. Like
    JohnnyK reacted to oldlady in New to ceramics   
    hello, tracey and welcome!
    can you explain a little more about what you want to achieve?   do you plan to work on the wheel or maybe do sculpture or make something in your hands alone?   what experience do you have in learning about making pottery?   do you exclusively use the internet or do you visit your local library?   are you in an area where pottery classes are being offered in the type of work you plan to do?  are you a new student somewhere and want to start out on your own now?
    the field is so broad that your questions will be answered more readily if you can narrow down what you want to know.
  5. Like
    JohnnyK reacted to Rae Reich in Trimming   
    If your porcelain has dried a little unevenly, the difference in 'drag' on your tool can get a 'wave' started that is hard to repair. Stop the wheel immediately and determine where your high/low spot is. You may be able to correct the area by hand scraping before (carefully) completing your wheel trimming. Re-moisten the rest of the untrimmed bases that remain on your board, cover lightly with plastic until moisture is distributed evenly. 
  6. Like
    JohnnyK got a reaction from sorhain in *F/S* *Skutt KS-1227-3 Kiln FOR SALE * $799   
    For those who might be interested...Where are you located?
  7. Like
    JohnnyK got a reaction from Pres in Giffin Grip Tips?   
    It does sound like the clay is too soft to effectively hold in place without distortion, particularly since you are gripping at 2/3 up. If you are just basically trimming the bottom of the mug, you might consider installing the handles if they don't rise above the rim of the cup. As you said, the timing is critical...use Pres's suggestions above...
    JohnnyK
  8. Like
    JohnnyK reacted to Pres in Giffin Grip Tips?   
    I use the GG on nearly everything, from mugs to bowls, to small jars and larger pieces. I have also used the GG to hold chucks for trimming made from plumbing pieces for plastic pipe. I hope I have a little expertise to pass on. I have been using one for over 30 years.
    When using the GG with mugs and small jars, I set the gripping pads to just below the base of the upside down piece. This allows me to trim when the pot is between cheese hard and leather hard. I don't like to trim anything before cheese hard. Definition of cheese hard is to imagine a slice of clay. . .if held out by the hand parallel to the floor, it will slump slightly from gravity. However the leather hard piece done the same will not. Both will be able to be bent slightly without cracking, the cheese hard more so. Both will trim well, but the leather hard piece is stronger and more resistant to denting. So trim at cheese to leather hard stages, then join your handles. 
    If interested in some of the chucks I use to trim lids, chalice stems, and other things, check out my blog site. 
     
    best,
    Pres
  9. Like
    JohnnyK got a reaction from Pyewackette in Yet another glaze sprayer posting - Compressors?   
    I'll send a personal message about the house painting since it's not appropriate for this board...
  10. Like
    JohnnyK reacted to RSWalker Art in The perils of using a .CO domain name   
    Coming from almost 25 years of experience in technology, focused on web technologies, e-commerce, and business systems, I always recommend trying your hardest to get a .com domain instead of any of the other top-level-domains, unless the US is not in your target market. Everyone remembers and almost instinctively puts in .com, regardless. Even the browsers want you to use a .com. Try typing just the word "google" in the address bar and press CTRL + Enter (I think is command + enter on Mac, mine isn't near me at the moment). 
    For those looking for domain names, services like https://www.domainnamesoup.com/ can be helpful. They allow you to mass lookup availability and help to create new combinations for inspiration. What we ended up doing, when renaming our business (a project still in process, so not using the name publicly yet) was to create a list of words we felt gave the emotional responses we wanted. For example, you might want to give the feeling of dependability, or solid foundation, etc. so you might start using words that feel like that: stone, core, clock, etc., but maybe you want to combine that with fresh and new, so perhaps "slate" for the stone and 'clean slate' term. 
    Once we had our list of words, we gave them all scores on length, ease of pronouncing (not everyone speaks your native tongue, help them out with simple words), and how many of our values they hit. Then we used Excel to create a two-word mashup for each word combination. With that list, I was able to copy and paste all of them as a "<word-one><word-two>.com" value into the Domain Name Soup site, and find out which ones were available. With the unavailable domains filtered out, we then each gave a yes/no to each combo, and merged that with the scoring. So the shortest, easiest to pronounce, easiest to spell, most liked, and most on company values combination bubbled up to the top. 
    Prior to that, it felt like throwing darts at one balloon in a pitch-black room, and we never got anywhere.
    As for registrars and who owns the domain, it is true that GoDaddy will hold on to the domain for a while, even after you've let it go, but it's to try and protect against accidental expiration and domain vultures. It used to be very common for a domain to expires, and a person would swoop in to buy it up in hopes that the original owner would be at their mercy and pay handsomely for its return. They're even worse than the squatters. While I, personally, do not care for GoDaddy anymore, they're safe to register domains through. They do, however, tend to raise the annual renewal more frequently than I care for. When I migrated my domains away from GoDaddy, it was automated and completed in minutes, with no resistance or issues. ICANN does a pretty good job of keeping the chaos to a low roar. 
    Hopefully, someone finds all that helpful! 
  11. Like
    JohnnyK got a reaction from Hulk in Yet another glaze sprayer posting - Compressors?   
    For your glazing, I would go with a pancake style diaphragm type oiless compressor. Just do a search on Amazon and you can find one for $109. The Harbor Freight $10 spray gun will work as a starter gun...as you gain experience, you may want to upgrade. The 150lbs of output pressure is inconsequential since you will only be spraying at between 10 and 30lbs since the gun is a high volume low pressure (HVLP) gun. Having been a contractor for 40 years, I have experience using HVLP, air, and airless sprayers, each having its advantages and disadvantages as well as specific applications.
    As for painting in the house, you'd be better off renting an airless sprayer. It does not work by magic … you are spraying just the paint at a very high pressure (in the range of 1200 to 2000lbs). You could use the HF spray gun to paint the room or the garage door, but not the whole house. You'd be spending more time putting paint in the gun than spraying.
  12. Like
    JohnnyK got a reaction from Pyewackette in Yet another glaze sprayer posting - Compressors?   
    For your glazing, I would go with a pancake style diaphragm type oiless compressor. Just do a search on Amazon and you can find one for $109. The Harbor Freight $10 spray gun will work as a starter gun...as you gain experience, you may want to upgrade. The 150lbs of output pressure is inconsequential since you will only be spraying at between 10 and 30lbs since the gun is a high volume low pressure (HVLP) gun. Having been a contractor for 40 years, I have experience using HVLP, air, and airless sprayers, each having its advantages and disadvantages as well as specific applications.
    As for painting in the house, you'd be better off renting an airless sprayer. It does not work by magic … you are spraying just the paint at a very high pressure (in the range of 1200 to 2000lbs). You could use the HF spray gun to paint the room or the garage door, but not the whole house. You'd be spending more time putting paint in the gun than spraying.
  13. Like
    JohnnyK got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Yet another glaze sprayer posting - Compressors?   
    For your glazing, I would go with a pancake style diaphragm type oiless compressor. Just do a search on Amazon and you can find one for $109. The Harbor Freight $10 spray gun will work as a starter gun...as you gain experience, you may want to upgrade. The 150lbs of output pressure is inconsequential since you will only be spraying at between 10 and 30lbs since the gun is a high volume low pressure (HVLP) gun. Having been a contractor for 40 years, I have experience using HVLP, air, and airless sprayers, each having its advantages and disadvantages as well as specific applications.
    As for painting in the house, you'd be better off renting an airless sprayer. It does not work by magic … you are spraying just the paint at a very high pressure (in the range of 1200 to 2000lbs). You could use the HF spray gun to paint the room or the garage door, but not the whole house. You'd be spending more time putting paint in the gun than spraying.
  14. Like
    JohnnyK reacted to NancyAmores in Question... Why Bisque Fire To Cone 05 Rather Than Cone 04?   
    When I used to bisque to 05, the porcelain was too porous, anything I dipped would get saturated and little air blowouts would happen all over the piece. Had to sand them down after glazing/before firing to smooth out the holes. Bisque firing to 04 took care of that, as well as some of the issues I was having with a red clay. Since I'm making mostly jewelry I dip the entire piece at once; there's heavy saturation, 06 sopped up too much glaze which caused the air blowouts.
  15. Like
    JohnnyK reacted to Benzine in Sink In My Classroom Solution   
    I would say, the drainage problem may be due to the build up of settled clay, over the years.  So even when you aren't working with clay, it's still causing a problem.
     
    I had this issue, in one of my classrooms.  The maintanence staff had to come in, and run a long snake to clean out the main drainage line.  Drained fine after that.
  16. Like
    JohnnyK reacted to LeeU in First Art Fair   
    That is an important bit of advice! Everything Neil mentioned is gold and should help assure a good experience at these shows.  I want to address the "flaws" disclosure issue. My perspective is perhaps a bit different from many ceramists, and I am not  a professional.   For me, the role of "flaws" in clay (or paintings, sculpture etc.) is an aesthetic and  philosophical issue that each craftman/artist should explore and come to personal terms with. Over time I have  moved from seeing technical flaws as flaws in the work--and even as flaws in me as the creator-- to seeing technical flaws as just that: technical.  If I am aiming for the best craft, the most sound chemistry/technique etc., that really matters. But if that is not my goal, then said flaws are not necessairly artistically "wrong".  Obviously, there is also the matter of values, and one should be quite clear about what one's values are, and why.  Then your words will reflect your values.
    First question---what flaws do you see? The flaws I see depend not just on my knowledge of ceramics, but also on my approach to the field and the process I use to generate my style. I decide, on a piece-by-piece basis, whether to accept technical flaws or not, as an artist. If I don't accept the flaws (i.e. the glaze crawled, piece has got some burples, there is a warped curve--whatever) the piece meets Mr. Hammer.  On the other hand,  I may choose to embrace those vagaries of forming the clay, glaze & firing as it is expressed in the finished piece, "warts and all".  Not ever to deceive or mislead a customer regarding the integrity of the piece--i.e. if it doesn't hold water one must disclose that the "vase" is only for dried flowers or pencils--but to stand behind my style, to affirm my point of view as the maker.  
    The point I am making is that while that perspective is not for everyone, perceiving flaws as flaws is a conscious process and may extend beyond the technical aspects. So, in that regard, it might be worth some of your time to think about what it is you do see as flaws, and why, and what do you want to do --or not do--about it. None of that involves pointing anything out with a customer! 
  17. Like
    JohnnyK reacted to neilestrick in Wheel Wobble/Surge   
    The wheel doesn't need to be level in order to center.
    Make sure the belt is tight/not slipping. Also inspect the belt and make sure there isn't a bulge in it anywhere. The womp is probably related to a specific spot on the belt.
  18. Like
    JohnnyK reacted to Pres in How do you feel about being called talented?   
    Talented as JohnnyK alludes to is not exclusive to the arts and crafts, but in every category of endeavor out there. It is also interesting to note that often one may be talented in one aspect of a field, and not in another. For example, I may be able to teach drawing and draw reasonably well, but am not talented. I handbuild well, but do not excel at it, but feel that I am most gifted at throwing.
    I found often that students would take an art class as a filler, knowing they were not gifted, but a few classes later found that they had found some aspect of art they were talented at. This is one of the reasons I believe very strongly that the arts, and crafts are extremely important in HS as it allows on the opportunity to discover a gift or talent early and thus nurture it with further study in either college or some other venue. This to me includes the traditional "industrial arts, performing arts and the others we have mentioned.
     
    best,
    Pres
  19. Like
    JohnnyK got a reaction from GEP in How do you feel about being called talented?   
    My feeling is..."If you got it, flaunt it"...No brag, just fact".  As I grew up and matured, I found that I had certain innate skills or abilities or talent to accomplish certain things. I work well with my hands. I spent the majority of my life making or fixing things in all the myriad jobs I had. I'm also a "talented" photographer with a good eye for composition. I am a hobby farmer and grow great veggies , making money selling them. I'm also a pretty decent potter and am selling a lot of what I make. I have the ability to look at many different kinds of problems and have the "talent" to visualize the solutions... or is it "skill"? Some folks say I'm talented...most of the time it is because I can do what they can't. Others say it's skill...for the same reason. I also find that folks that have similar skills or talents appreciate what I can do and know the level of effort it takes to get to where I am. So if someone says I'm talented, I say "Thanks!" and accept it as a compliment or accept their money for what I have provided them...
    JohnnyK
  20. Like
    JohnnyK got a reaction from JeffK in How do you feel about being called talented?   
    My feeling is..."If you got it, flaunt it"...No brag, just fact".  As I grew up and matured, I found that I had certain innate skills or abilities or talent to accomplish certain things. I work well with my hands. I spent the majority of my life making or fixing things in all the myriad jobs I had. I'm also a "talented" photographer with a good eye for composition. I am a hobby farmer and grow great veggies , making money selling them. I'm also a pretty decent potter and am selling a lot of what I make. I have the ability to look at many different kinds of problems and have the "talent" to visualize the solutions... or is it "skill"? Some folks say I'm talented...most of the time it is because I can do what they can't. Others say it's skill...for the same reason. I also find that folks that have similar skills or talents appreciate what I can do and know the level of effort it takes to get to where I am. So if someone says I'm talented, I say "Thanks!" and accept it as a compliment or accept their money for what I have provided them...
    JohnnyK
  21. Like
    JohnnyK got a reaction from Pres in How do you feel about being called talented?   
    My feeling is..."If you got it, flaunt it"...No brag, just fact".  As I grew up and matured, I found that I had certain innate skills or abilities or talent to accomplish certain things. I work well with my hands. I spent the majority of my life making or fixing things in all the myriad jobs I had. I'm also a "talented" photographer with a good eye for composition. I am a hobby farmer and grow great veggies , making money selling them. I'm also a pretty decent potter and am selling a lot of what I make. I have the ability to look at many different kinds of problems and have the "talent" to visualize the solutions... or is it "skill"? Some folks say I'm talented...most of the time it is because I can do what they can't. Others say it's skill...for the same reason. I also find that folks that have similar skills or talents appreciate what I can do and know the level of effort it takes to get to where I am. So if someone says I'm talented, I say "Thanks!" and accept it as a compliment or accept their money for what I have provided them...
    JohnnyK
  22. Like
    JohnnyK reacted to LeeU in Best Glaze Colors for 2019 and Craft Fairs - Holiday Markets   
    I am willfully uniformed about many things (like trends) and most of the time I value my own opinion over most anyone else's, except when I am seeking facts and expertise, in which case I am a humble, grateful student. That is the bias undergirding my comment.  I think one of the best things about creating art/executing craft is the personal autonomy of choosing. In the case of clay, choosing one's color, body, fire type, form, glaze, treatment, concept, market, it's role in one's life, etc.  So,  I just don't get it...why  would it matter (alleged  color trends) in the first place?  
  23. Like
    JohnnyK reacted to Babs in Anyone know what these tiles are for?   
    Why not ask the person!
  24. Like
    JohnnyK got a reaction from Rae Reich in Quick Tips   
    I have found that welding gloves work really well for this, too. It's not like your handling the peep for any great length of time...and they're not as awkward as the tongs. You can get them inexpensively at Harbor Freight...https://www.harborfreight.com/search?q=welding gloves
    JohnnyK
  25. Like
    JohnnyK got a reaction from Hulk in Alternative to pin tool?   
    An example of the uneven rim can be seen in my latest photo of "Another Horsehair Raku Trio". The gal at the studio that took in the pieces for the auction said that the rim and the trinket made the piece look really neat...
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