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GEP

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  1. Like
    GEP got a reaction from neilestrick in Ceramic Pincushions-Everything You Need To Know To Make Them   
    I recently developed a need for a pincushion. I started shopping for one, and found that all of the ones you can buy either look like they are not very functional, or they are way too cutesy for me. Then I remembered that @Mark C. had posted his pincushion design with instructions on the forum. I searched the forum and found this thread. 
    Now I have a new pincushion that is very functional and suits my tastes. All of the materials were already in my house, so it was free too. Thank you, Mark!!

  2. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Babs in Ceramic Pincushions-Everything You Need To Know To Make Them   
    I recently developed a need for a pincushion. I started shopping for one, and found that all of the ones you can buy either look like they are not very functional, or they are way too cutesy for me. Then I remembered that @Mark C. had posted his pincushion design with instructions on the forum. I searched the forum and found this thread. 
    Now I have a new pincushion that is very functional and suits my tastes. All of the materials were already in my house, so it was free too. Thank you, Mark!!

  3. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Ceramic Pincushions-Everything You Need To Know To Make Them   
    I recently developed a need for a pincushion. I started shopping for one, and found that all of the ones you can buy either look like they are not very functional, or they are way too cutesy for me. Then I remembered that @Mark C. had posted his pincushion design with instructions on the forum. I searched the forum and found this thread. 
    Now I have a new pincushion that is very functional and suits my tastes. All of the materials were already in my house, so it was free too. Thank you, Mark!!

  4. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Benzine in Glaze is glossy on inside of pot, but like sandpaper on outside   
    Ok, my next questions are, what is your experience level at making pots? And how long have you used this particular glaze? 
    Glazing is a skill that takes a lot of practice. Even those of us with a lot of experience know that when we start using a new glaze, it takes a while to figure out the best way to apply it.
    You are brushing on a commercial glaze, which indicates you might be a beginner potter. (nothing wrong with that ... we all started as beginners!) Brushing is the most inconsistent technique for applying glazes, because it's hard to gauge how thick you have actually applied it. I think what's happening to your pots is that the glaze on the inside is much thicker than on the outside. Even if you brushed on the same number of layers inside and out, trying adding another layer or two to the outside. 
  5. Like
    GEP reacted to Hulk in What’s on your workbench?   
    My shelves are filling up with green ware too - gotta bisque soon! ...made some room, drilled all the crazed stuff, put'm outside on the potting shelves (potting of plants) with raised bed mix + sand and succulent starts, aah, better! ...the repurposed crazies are mixed in with another project - cuttings and rootlings from front yard favourites for after the decimation to come, new septic tank and leach field. I plan to bury a few pots next to the new tank for the space alien archeologists to find in the far someday o' th' future.
     
    Best wishes for your husband's complete recovery Denise!
    ...note to all anywhere near fifty, don't put off your scope session!! And for those +fifty, don't put off your follow up scope sessions!

  6. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Hulk in What’s on your workbench?   
    @liambesaw, the way I see it, it’s much better to start out with low prices, and raise them if the pots are flying off the shelf. Compared to starting out with overpriced pots, and having to lower the prices. Especially at a recurring market like a farmers market, where the same customers are going to see the evolution of your prices. 
    Also, don’t let others pressure you into raising your prices. Especially from across the internet. We don’t know the area where you’re selling. Every location has different market forces. Base your pricing decisions on how fast your pots are selling. 
    From across the internet, I can’t judge the weight and balance of your pots. But from what I can see, your pots are very attractive and of good craftsmanship. So present them with a sense of respect, not like bargain fodder. Which is related, but not specifically the same thing, as the number on the price tag. 
    This market is a good choice for your first attempt at fair selling, due to its low booth fee. You can continue to do it this summer for the experience, but I would also start looking for something that is a step up. Where you won’t be selling pots next to snake oil. 
  7. Like
    GEP reacted to mgtmeehan in QotW: What is your most unapologetic, shamelessly proud, pat-yourself-on-the-back accomplishment of any type in Ceramics?   
    My answer may be a little different, because it concerns someone else’s ceramics... but I was his HS teacher.  Many years ago, I had an extremely gifted student who was enrolled in each of my art classes throughout  his 4 years of high school.  I needed to be a Jack of All Trades, as the only art teacher in a rural high school... taught First Year Studio, Drawing and Painting, Printmaking, Photography, Sculpture and of course, Ceramics. His 3rd year, after Studio, and Drawing and Painting, he enrolled in Ceramics.  However, he always seemed to gravitate right back to his easel... he really was getting better and better at painting, BUT he was ignoring his Ceramics.  I knew he had a bright future, and was trying to help him get a scholarship to college... BUT did not want to mess up his chances with a low grade in Ceramics... so we made a bargain.  I would sustain his 4.0, but he had to put in double time after school or whenever, to get his Ceramics done.  Well, he did it. Then went on to win  a scholarship to the Boston Museum School (affiliate Tufts U, at Boston Museum of Fine Arts.). His first year in Boston, he excelled in Ceramics and became a fantastic, prolific, creative  potter. (but still painted :-) That young man went on to work at the Guggenheim, then the Smithsonian.  Now in his forties, he just completed a book, and has created an exhibit comparing Matisse’ inspiration to the work of native Alaskan indigenous peoples.  He has made me proud. :-)
  8. Like
    GEP reacted to Benzine in QotW: What is your most unapologetic, shamelessly proud, pat-yourself-on-the-back accomplishment of any type in Ceramics?   
    That's a very tough question.  It's a great question, just tough to answer.  
    I would say the thing, I am currently most proud of, is having myself and my Art Club make mugs for all the Staff, in our Building.  It ended up being about 90 mugs.  I did most the heavy lifting, in regards to throwing, as I wanted them to be consistent, but the kids added handles and a raised mascot head, that we press molded.  They also glazed everything.  
    The Staff seemed very appreciative, especially the Associated, Kitchen Staff, and Custodians, who don't get a lot of credit and recognition.  The Head Custodian, came up and gave me a hug!
    We are still making them for new Staff as well, as a Welcome.  The goal was only to do a few here and there, but we've had quite a bit of turnover, for various reasons, so we've been busy...
  9. Like
    GEP reacted to Mark C. in QotW: What is your most unapologetic, shamelessly proud, pat-yourself-on-the-back accomplishment of any type in Ceramics?   
    For me it may be building two salt kiln conversions at a Molkai Art center on two different trips. Pro Bono as well. I am in the giving back space of life and passing on knowledge is part of that process. It felt right and was for a good cause . It still feels great years later
  10. Like
    GEP reacted to Denice in QotW: What is your most unapologetic, shamelessly proud, pat-yourself-on-the-back accomplishment of any type in Ceramics?   
    I think for me it is designing and testing  C 1   Majolica  glaze and clay body for two years that would hold up to nasty icy winter weather.  I wanted to keep the rich and brilliant color that is lost with higher firings.   I am working on another project that is just as difficult and lots of testing,  I am not there yet but I am confident  I will get the results I want.  Denice
  11. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Chilly in QotW: What is your most unapologetic, shamelessly proud, pat-yourself-on-the-back accomplishment of any type in Ceramics?   
    Smithsonian Craft Show.
    20 years ago I thought it was an impossible goal. 20 years from now, I'll be thinking "I can't believe that really happened."
  12. Like
    GEP got a reaction from LeeU in QotW: What is your most unapologetic, shamelessly proud, pat-yourself-on-the-back accomplishment of any type in Ceramics?   
    Smithsonian Craft Show.
    20 years ago I thought it was an impossible goal. 20 years from now, I'll be thinking "I can't believe that really happened."
  13. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Roberta12 in Pinholes using SLOW bisque fire schedule and vent-sure   
    I agree that this is probably not a venting issue. And that I would like to see photos of your pinholes. Can you post some photos? 
  14. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Min in QotW: What is your most unapologetic, shamelessly proud, pat-yourself-on-the-back accomplishment of any type in Ceramics?   
    Smithsonian Craft Show.
    20 years ago I thought it was an impossible goal. 20 years from now, I'll be thinking "I can't believe that really happened."
  15. Like
    GEP reacted to dhPotter in Pinholes using SLOW bisque fire schedule and vent-sure   
    Not sure if this will be relevant to your case - I have been using Laguna 609 #65 for about 3 years now. BUT, I single fire and use my own glazes and do not get pinholes. My firing schedule goes slow in the first 500* because of single firing. Then goes at 400* per hour. At 2050*F the ramp slows to 108* per hour till 2185* for a 15 minute hold. Then free fall to 2085* for a 20 minute hold. The changing to 2050*F to a slower speed going up and the hold at 100* less than peak temp on the way down are supposed to get rid of any pinholes. Again I do not have pinholes. Try single firing. I use glazes found in John Britt's cone 6 glaze book and from Mastering Cone 6 Glazes book.
    Glaze cone 6...
    Segment        Rate F*/HR    Temp    Hold
       1            200         220     30-60
       2            100         500      0
       3            400        2050      0
       4            108        2185^     15
       5           9999        2085     20
       6           9999        1700      0
       7             50        1600     60
       8             50        1500      0
  16. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Benzine in QotW: What is your most unapologetic, shamelessly proud, pat-yourself-on-the-back accomplishment of any type in Ceramics?   
    Smithsonian Craft Show.
    20 years ago I thought it was an impossible goal. 20 years from now, I'll be thinking "I can't believe that really happened."
  17. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Pres in QotW: What is your most unapologetic, shamelessly proud, pat-yourself-on-the-back accomplishment of any type in Ceramics?   
    Smithsonian Craft Show.
    20 years ago I thought it was an impossible goal. 20 years from now, I'll be thinking "I can't believe that really happened."
  18. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Hulk in QotW: What is your most unapologetic, shamelessly proud, pat-yourself-on-the-back accomplishment of any type in Ceramics?   
    Smithsonian Craft Show.
    20 years ago I thought it was an impossible goal. 20 years from now, I'll be thinking "I can't believe that really happened."
  19. Like
    GEP reacted to Bill Kielb in Pinholes using SLOW bisque fire schedule and vent-sure   
    @FGC
    Ok, (Overkill for most but you asked)
    20 minutes of couch sketching gets you a quick drawing below. Basically having measured these counter flow exhausts  they end up about 0.1” -  0.15” of water column at the collection manifold. Sounds  more complicated than it is. It is simply the small amount of force necessary to lift a column of water up one tenth of an inch. Not very much! So because this is so small the remedy is to take this one inch  vertical column of water, incline it and stretch it out to say 10”. Voila, instantly easier to see a  one tenth inch rise.
    In case you are curious, fan pressures are tiny so we often measure them in W.C. (Inches of water column) or inches of h2o. How small is that? Your car tire is probably inflated to 32 psi.  It takes just under 28” of water column to equal 1 psi! So tiny, tiny pressures, especially when we are measuring tenths of inches.
    I have watched folks use these temporary manometers  in a pinch and they can be very accurate depending how much care is taken in making them, marking them and leveling them. The manometer must be level when filling and measuring, which also means when constructing really square (90:degree) and parallel construction.
    Measure at the collection box where the yellow arrow is in the picture. Simply stick the vinyl hose in the box, no pointing it toward the hose or sealing it in. we simply want the negative pressure within the box. I used to teach HVAC fluid mechanics, etc... and generally when I made the students start thinking of air as a fluid that acts like water and moves from a higher pressure to a lower pressure as opposed to a breeze they understood far better and went on to design ductwork, fan blades, airplane wings ..... you name it.
    finally, the instructions from L&L really stresses that the bypass opening  is for fine adjustment and the number of holes drilled and or plugged will have the largest effect. I highlighted the section illustrating this.
    In the design I provided, the suction pressure will pull up the water and you will read the suction pressure as the water is drawn up the tube. All connections need to be reasonably tight but this is fairly easy with the vinyl tubing if the hole is drilled slightly undersized from the tubing and the tube is angle cut before inserting it into the hole.
    good luck, hope that helps

  20. Like
    GEP reacted to Pres in QotW: What is your most unapologetic, shamelessly proud, pat-yourself-on-the-back accomplishment of any type in Ceramics?   
    Oh MY! Questions in the question bank, glad to know folks are getting tired of me presenting my questions! LeeU recently posed the following: What is your most unapologetic, shamelessly proud, pat-yourself-on-the-back accomplishment of any type in your ceramics life (a terrific piece, a  great sale, a sharp business strategy, a fine friend made, a good deed done, a land traveled, a discovery---etc. etc.)?  
    Wow! that is a mouthful, but a thoughtful question. I can't say that there has been any one thing that stands out for me.  There have been times I have won awards at a local juried show, or even been shown in a State wide juried show. There have also been the times when I had thrown very large forms, even for most of the other students around me at PSU. Then there was being elected chapter president for the Blair County Guild of Craftsmen, or more recently elected to the board of the Potters Council by members. All of these, are of note, but in the long run do not last very long.
    One of my most recent pats on the back came in the form of a letter from the church next door.  Last year one of the church members, an older woman, requested that I make a pair of chalices and a long french loaf paten for the church in memory of her daughter that had passed recently. I told her I would be happy to do it, but that it would take me probably a year as I was in the middle of orders and would be into Winter when I could not get things done. She accepted that, and had been patient. Order delivered not too long ago, she was very pleased. The church letter came a week later stating that the Communion set had been used blessed and used for the congregation communion. The letter stated that they were so blessed to have such a great talent in their midst! If they only knew how so little of it was talent, but more trial and error, and making the paten 3 times! But I still pat myself on the back. . . softly!
     
    best,
    Pres
  21. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Pinholes using SLOW bisque fire schedule and vent-sure   
    This is another area worth exploring. Overfiring some glaze/clay combinations by just a little can cause pinholes. I developed a pinholing problem when I switched claybodies years ago, The glaze worked fine on my old claybody, but pinholed on the new one. I tried a bunch of possible fixes, and the answer turned out to be to lower my firing temp from cone 6 to cone 5.75. 
  22. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Pinholes using SLOW bisque fire schedule and vent-sure   
    This is another area worth exploring. Overfiring some glaze/clay combinations by just a little can cause pinholes. I developed a pinholing problem when I switched claybodies years ago, The glaze worked fine on my old claybody, but pinholed on the new one. I tried a bunch of possible fixes, and the answer turned out to be to lower my firing temp from cone 6 to cone 5.75. 
  23. Like
    GEP got a reaction from shawnhar in What’s on your workbench?   
    @liambesaw, the way I see it, it’s much better to start out with low prices, and raise them if the pots are flying off the shelf. Compared to starting out with overpriced pots, and having to lower the prices. Especially at a recurring market like a farmers market, where the same customers are going to see the evolution of your prices. 
    Also, don’t let others pressure you into raising your prices. Especially from across the internet. We don’t know the area where you’re selling. Every location has different market forces. Base your pricing decisions on how fast your pots are selling. 
    From across the internet, I can’t judge the weight and balance of your pots. But from what I can see, your pots are very attractive and of good craftsmanship. So present them with a sense of respect, not like bargain fodder. Which is related, but not specifically the same thing, as the number on the price tag. 
    This market is a good choice for your first attempt at fair selling, due to its low booth fee. You can continue to do it this summer for the experience, but I would also start looking for something that is a step up. Where you won’t be selling pots next to snake oil. 
  24. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Kakes in Vacuum cleaner for the clay studio, yes or no?   
    I have a Miele vacuum, and use their bags and filters, 
  25. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Rae Reich in What’s on your workbench?   
    @liambesaw, the way I see it, it’s much better to start out with low prices, and raise them if the pots are flying off the shelf. Compared to starting out with overpriced pots, and having to lower the prices. Especially at a recurring market like a farmers market, where the same customers are going to see the evolution of your prices. 
    Also, don’t let others pressure you into raising your prices. Especially from across the internet. We don’t know the area where you’re selling. Every location has different market forces. Base your pricing decisions on how fast your pots are selling. 
    From across the internet, I can’t judge the weight and balance of your pots. But from what I can see, your pots are very attractive and of good craftsmanship. So present them with a sense of respect, not like bargain fodder. Which is related, but not specifically the same thing, as the number on the price tag. 
    This market is a good choice for your first attempt at fair selling, due to its low booth fee. You can continue to do it this summer for the experience, but I would also start looking for something that is a step up. Where you won’t be selling pots next to snake oil. 
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