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mnnaj

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  1. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Min in clay bags   
    If you can crochet, cut a bag into 1 long continuous strip, the width will vary depending on what thickness you are comfortable using.  Crochet into a rug, either round and round or back and forth.  I've made plastic bag rugs for years to put outside the tent, in the car to kneel on for a flat tire or picnic and for the back door.
    Nancy J
  2. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from akilspots in clay bags   
    If you can crochet, cut a bag into 1 long continuous strip, the width will vary depending on what thickness you are comfortable using.  Crochet into a rug, either round and round or back and forth.  I've made plastic bag rugs for years to put outside the tent, in the car to kneel on for a flat tire or picnic and for the back door.
    Nancy J
  3. Like
    mnnaj reacted to LeeU in Clay for slab building   
    My current project is making herb markers for retail sale. The basic form is like a paint stirring stick with a point at the end (no indent at the top). Greenware is about  9" x 1" x 1/8". The pic is not the final design--I'm not running the stamp to the top, for example and the point will be a bit longer/pointier. I'm still perfecting my technique for a retail production process-it is quite the opposite of my usual headspace when working w/clay (I'm very rough & tumble/freeform/warts & all). While I am doing this mental (& physical touch) reset to get into a mode of more precision & refinement, I have learned that the clay I am using is not suitable--way, way too moist/soft/sticky. In the past I have used Bella's Blend, a supposedly "true" low-to-mid fire body at 05/5 with great results, tho I personally favor stiff clays w/grog. I am looking for some suggestions, based on experience, regarding a body (any supplier-I'll pay the shipping!) that might be especially suited to making this form. I think I want to go low fire using Mayco Stroke & Coat, IF it is likely the sticks will be strong enough to stick in a planter outdoors (thoughts?). If not, I'll do 5-6. I really-really-really want to do single fire. Someone would have to convince me if that's a bad idea and give me a good reason why! Thanks in advance-I am experiencing way too much breakage with the current clay. 

  4. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Rae Reich in Slipcasting Marbling Effects Help   
    Doing like OldLady suggests will create a line,  but if you work quickly it the white will absorb around the color - the color won't pop off.
    Another idea might be to coat the entire inside of the mold with a thin coat of the color(s),  add  the white for thickness.  Then when the piece is bone dry use a resist and do some hydro-abrasion to wash the color down to the white.  It might not look like marbling, but it can be cool.  
  5. Like
    mnnaj reacted to Rae Reich in Slipcasting Marbling Effects Help   
    If I understand @oldlady, she meant to pour the full coat before the marbling dries up. Work quickly.
  6. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in Covid -19 Cleanliness   
    After reading all of this my questions are:  Do you need to reclaim your clay at all?  Could you afford to throw it away until  Covid 19 has a vaccine?
    Does it build up so much that it must be dealt with every week?   When I was taking classes at the U of MN, there must have been 16 to 20  class times a week with 20 students per class.   We reclaimed the clay maybe every other week.   Unless your students produce large amounts to be reclaimed, would there be a place to put the reclaim so it could sit in brutes - large buckets - for a month (or two)? 
  7. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Will Greenware Porcelain Get Stuck To Stoneware?   
    I would suggest using a kiln shelf.  Shelves are already strong.  Using a different clay as a waster or shrink slab is not recommended because different clays shrink at different rates.
    Nancy
  8. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Callum Donovan-Grujicich in Will Greenware Porcelain Get Stuck To Stoneware?   
    I would suggest using a kiln shelf.  Shelves are already strong.  Using a different clay as a waster or shrink slab is not recommended because different clays shrink at different rates.
    Nancy
  9. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from jrgpots in Do you have pictures of extruded colored clay   
    Unfortunately I do not have photos.   The school I work in has a red cone 6 clay and a white cone 6 clay.  I have used the two clays together and extruded them as a hollow 6 sided tube.  This is what I recommend;   
    -let the two clays be in the same bag for at least a week to get to the same moisture content.
    -make 2 logs of each clay to slam/roll together,  stack them like a checkerboard.
    - put in the extruder , don't mix the clays too much or it will be one color. 
    Good luck - most of the color changes were in stripes, they didn't move around on the bias.  One of my students made her extrusions solid, then cut them like coins and built a tray out of them, she put them through the slab roller to even  them out.  Turned out great.
    Nancy
  10. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in Do you have pictures of extruded colored clay   
    Unfortunately I do not have photos.   The school I work in has a red cone 6 clay and a white cone 6 clay.  I have used the two clays together and extruded them as a hollow 6 sided tube.  This is what I recommend;   
    -let the two clays be in the same bag for at least a week to get to the same moisture content.
    -make 2 logs of each clay to slam/roll together,  stack them like a checkerboard.
    - put in the extruder , don't mix the clays too much or it will be one color. 
    Good luck - most of the color changes were in stripes, they didn't move around on the bias.  One of my students made her extrusions solid, then cut them like coins and built a tray out of them, she put them through the slab roller to even  them out.  Turned out great.
    Nancy
  11. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Rae Reich in Parting Stones - better than a covered jar?   
    I too have made urns for family.  All had seen the jars before they died.  I have made small urns for myself and my husband.  He wants his ashes to be in multiple places.  
    The idea of "parting stones" sounds interesting.  A stone is portable, no one would look twice at someone dropping a stone at a rivers edge, an urn seems to need to be concealed or buried. 
    My only regret would be that I would be unable to do it myself, because I would be gone.
    Nancy
  12. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Rae Reich in Hump molds   
    Once you get the form made out of the foam, you could coat it with plaster to make a mold that will dry the clay.   I saw Margaret Bohls make a form that way.  It was lightweight and easy to use.
    Nancy J
  13. Like
    mnnaj got a reaction from Roberta12 in Hump molds   
    The form that Margaret made out of foam looked similar to the one you just posted out of clay.  She glued multiple thickness together to get the height she wanted.  After carving out the foam, she mixed up some plaster, when it got to the point of being thick - not hard, she spread it on like frosting over the entire top of the hump, she also set the form on some plaster to completely surround it.  I believe she tapped and jiggled  the form a bit to get it to flatten the high spots .  There may have been use of a surform or green scrubby to smooth things out when it was hardened.
    Nancy
  14. Like
    mnnaj reacted to neilestrick in Prep, pack, transport & set up for a craft fair   
    @Bam2015 Here's a PDF version.
     
    Estrick_Feb20CM.pdf
  15. Like
    mnnaj reacted to Min in Wood Firing Tips   
    The seashell is supported with wadding, sandwich the seashell between the pot and the wadding. Cockle shells are good, you want the shells or pieces of shell big enough so that the flame can work along it to make distinctive pattern (if you're lucky). After the firing any stuck on bits can dissolved by soaking the pot in water. The place you are firing at might want you to use their wadding.
  16. Like
    mnnaj reacted to Bill Kielb in Solid State Relay Conversion   
    That’s a lot of grinding, I would try a diamond tile saw (wet saw)  to cut.  it has worked for me when cutting old shelfs for spacers etc.... This  post started out as something about using bonded nitride shelves which resist glaze sticking to them.  @Mark C. mentioned that his posts did tend to stick over time so his answer was to kiln  wash the ends once per year or so. If they stick,  (Regardless to cone six or ten) then using his solution seems simple. If not there appears to be no need for it.
    Personally I like his idea as we do this with our posts for our soda kiln even though everything gets wadding it makes cleanup much easier and is a simple quick dip of both ends of the post as needed  before it is put away after removal from a soda fire.
  17. Like
    mnnaj reacted to Mark C. in Solid State Relay Conversion   
    Wet diamond saw cuts posts like butter
    you can use a dry masonry saw blade on a stationary saw but it’s dusty
    consider cutting them down to 1/2 inch sizes as well
    i used to fire 600 5 inch slip cast pots in a car kiln do I ordered 5.25 inch stilts custom made and they really saved space 
    think outside the box
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