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Rebel_Rocker

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About Rebel_Rocker

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  1. Not sure what temp it takes to 'fix' the oxide. Main problem with brushing it on is that it can be 'spotty'. That can be good or bad. One time I wanted it heavy so I put it on greenware, bisqued and then reapplied on the bisque. It did come out heavier than usual (on bisque only). My intent was a very metallic no glaze finish. This was just applied haevily to bisque: Putting it on greenware helps it fix some, but it can still be rubbed off. So the temp required for a full fix is higher than cone 6. This was put on bisque then rubbed off with sponge just to highlight:
  2. Both appear to be good wheels from everyone's comments. But the new one seems like a no brainer, no wear and tear, warranty, no driving and same price...
  3. red stoneware, about 9-10 inches tall. Still drying for bisque. Thrown pot, added embelishments, stamped and carved.
  4. My latest bottle out of the kiln. Cone10 Stoneware, thrown and altered cylinder and spout. Tenmoku glaze (a little thin ) with a buttermilk over it. 7.5 inches tall by 5 inches wide. Pours pretty good out of the back of the spout.
  5. http://www.steveirvine.com/goldleaf.html he uses gold leaf on pots after fire, you can also get silver leaf. I think that is the best use for them as you actually get the properties that make them so unique. You could also metal turn them, etc... for cool effects. I've also heard about using some gold in the kiln but am not sure what the process is called, it's also used for gold designs like gold leaf, but is suppose to be very tricky to get right, though it might be more permanent for dinner ware. But like John said, why use gold for reds if you can use copper? I haven't mixed up a
  6. Whoops, guess I can't edit the details. Wheel thrown and altered, used a Bill VanGelder technique from a youtube video to flatten the edges. Have a larger matching on that this fits inside of but it hasn't been fired yet.
  7. My first casserole dish. It was about 3 pound of dark brown clay. 5x4 inches. Glazed with buttermilk white and a few stripes of tenmoku.
  8. slab built jar, 6x4x1.5"
  9. middle three have shellac/water etched designs
  10. Some of my early work... just figured I'd share. I've had about 6-7 weeks in the ceramics lab. The salt yellow glaze was mixed wrong and came out chocolate brown. The other two should be in the next firing.
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