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LilyT

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About LilyT

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

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  • Location
    California
  • Interests
    What interests are there other than pottery? Well, a little glassblowing.
  1. This is great! Did you throw this as one piece all at the same time?
  2. LilyT

    Joel-Pottery.jpg

    this is beautiful, too. How do you do that texturing?
  3. Geez, those look great. I had been going to get some work done on my computer tonight, but this notification popped up in my email and now I have to keep admiring. $5 is such a deal, no wonder they are snapped up. How many do you think you will sell at this show? -Lily
  4. That's so interesting! Does that mean you don't flip your shelves over between firings? So is there any further use for them? Like lining the bottom of a wood fire kiln? I was looking for used silicon carbide at one point to use as an absorption surface for a solar furnace to build with my kids. -Lily I bust then into small nurds to add 5/8 to 3/4 of an inch when the stilt is to short. when loading Mark How practical. I don't think I've heard the phrase 'nurds' however. Maybe it's too late for my brain to work. -Lily
  5. That's so interesting! Does that mean you don't flip your shelves over between firings? So is there any further use for them? Like lining the bottom of a wood fire kiln? I was looking for used silicon carbide at one point to use as an absorption surface for a solar furnace to build with my kids. -Lily
  6. Wow, that's pretty prompt construction, it's a lot more complicated than stacking a bunch of bricks :-). You certainly aren't wary of getting right in there and fixing it right up. I'd *love* to to build a permanent kiln somewhere that works well. (I believe the concurrent thread about permitting adequately goes into why not.) It's awesome that you have 8 burners. I imagine it would be hard for them to all blow out at the same time without you noticing. In my experience having an observant and careful person firing and watching a kiln is superior in every way to leaving a kiln unatt
  7. Mark, Still seems cheap to me, too. But the ultimate measure is that your beautiful work is produced. Thanks for sharing! I'm also curious about how long it took you to build your wonderful car kiln. How many burners does it use? Did you design it all yourself? I know you mentioned rebuilding it, so 'm sure you at least modified it to work better for you. I am going to throw some spoonrests tomorrow :-) -Lily
  8. Hi, Mark, My kids and I were just discussing today how a car kiln would be so much easier to load, and then to get everything done at once. I'll have to share your construction details with them. I glaze fire as fast as possible to temperature (about 5 hours to ^10, 3-1/2 to ^5), my 3 cu ft kiln has one venturi. Then hold at temp and do a controlled firedown for 6 hours. After that the kiln is so small that it cools to 100F in 12 hours. I totally agree that it's best not to get too caught up in the cost details, there's only so much time and energy a person has, and it should b
  9. There is the key. NOTHING takes the place of experience and education in ANY field. In addition to the additional physical stacking space, the use of what are known as "low termal mass refractories" saves you on firing costs. My 3/4 " thick 18" x 18" traditional silicon carbide shelves are HEAVY. My 1/2" thick nitride bonded ones are much lighter. My 1/4" thick Advancers are featherweight! A good part of the heat energy used in periodic kilns (they type we fire) to bring them up to temperature is used to heat the kiln structure and the kiln furniture...... not the wares
  10. Hi, Mark, So nice of you to go through the trouble to dig up and correlate records. Also, impressed that you keep records and not misplace them after a few years :-). It seems that your total energy costs run slightly less than $3 per cu ft of finished ware. Whereas mine runs about $10 per cu ft. Bigger kilns are more fuel efficient I would presume? Also, I bet that you are more efficient firing than I am. All these details are interesting to know, I bet this is helpful for other real potters (like yourself and unlike yours truly). I know in some parts of the world, p
  11. I had to go back and look at your glaze firing picture again. Your glazework is so beautiful. As are the forms. Each piece is like a gleaming treasure. -Lily
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