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Red Rocks

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  1. Like
    Red Rocks got a reaction from Rae Reich in plastic clay and drying performance   
    A couple of thoughts on cracking - I do lots of dinnerware and large platters.  Years ago I would cut the clay off from the bag, smack it around a little and put it on the wheel (this is circa the 70's and 80's).  I never had a problem with cracking.  Fast forward to today and if I don't wedge the clay really well before throwing a dinner plate or platter, I will most definitely get some that crack.  I resisted this for a long time, as I hate wedging.  It is worse with some clays but I find this to be true with all three of the clays I use.  So if you are making flat bottomed pieces, it is worth the effort of wedging!
  2. Like
    Red Rocks got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in plastic clay and drying performance   
    A couple of thoughts on cracking - I do lots of dinnerware and large platters.  Years ago I would cut the clay off from the bag, smack it around a little and put it on the wheel (this is circa the 70's and 80's).  I never had a problem with cracking.  Fast forward to today and if I don't wedge the clay really well before throwing a dinner plate or platter, I will most definitely get some that crack.  I resisted this for a long time, as I hate wedging.  It is worse with some clays but I find this to be true with all three of the clays I use.  So if you are making flat bottomed pieces, it is worth the effort of wedging!
  3. Like
    Red Rocks reacted to neilestrick in Shipping size and cost for dinnerware set   
    You can fit each group of items in one box. Put some thin foam between each plate, and wrap up the set of 6 as one solid item. Wrap them tight with plastic wrap or tape so they can't rattle, then pack them in the box as if it were one piece. Figure out what size box and approximate weight, then go online to USPS or UPS or FedEx and put the info in and you can see how much it'll cost.
  4. Like
    Red Rocks got a reaction from Rae Reich in SEDONA ARTS FESTIVAL   
    Wow!  A lot of great and thoughtful responses to this topic.  Here is some feedback from Sedona:
    1.  We went to Zapp to streamline the application process.  We still do in-depth jurying of every application  to ensure a high quality show.  Zapp is indeed a photo management system.  Years ago I ran the Tempe Arts Festival - we used to get 5 slides from 1500 artists for 325 booths - now that was time consuming.   
    2.  A couple of you indicate do a better job of  marketing ourselves to artists.  Would love to hear any ideas on long these lines.  
    3.  Mark asked about number of attendees - it is right around 3,000.  We have a new board made up of artists and business people who are committed to invigorating and expanding the Festival primarily thru more advertising/marketing in the 6 million plus metro Phoenix area.
    4.  I really like the idea of a discount to attract new artists and will propose it to the board.
    5.  I agree with Neil - you definitely want to bring in new artists and keep them rotating so the look of the show stays fresh.
    6.  At least in our case, Zapp has nothing to do with racking up jury fees.  We would charge the same jury fee if we just asked for 5 photos without a system like  Zapp.  Jurying is a break even process we pay a group to jury the applications and another group to jury the show for cash awards.  We pay out what we take in.
    Thanks for all your responses - please keep them coming!
  5. Like
    Red Rocks got a reaction from Pres in How Much Do You Sell Your Mugs For?   
    Quite often in fact. I have often wondered about the piece that stands hand and shoulders above all of the others. It is basically the same form, the same colors, same decoration and handles as the others, but for some reason it stands out as being superior. The problem is, do I price it higher because I believe it to be better-as if it were a One-in-a-Thousand Winchester rifle, or do I price it like all of the rest? Or even sell it at all. In the end I sell it at the same price as all of the others because it is my sense of aesthetic being pleased, not the purchaser. Do the sell faster than their brothers-No, because beauty is in the eye of the beholder. If you are selling your pottery for a price you require and you are satisfied with it then by all means do so. Myself, as I am always insecure in my pricing choose to use some formulae to help me arrive at a solution that works for me-at least minimally, and if I need to add a little more for my own ego, I do so.
     
     
    I would say that the one that stands out as superior – is a gift from the kiln gods. If it stands out to you, it is also going to stand out to the customer who has a heightened sense of appreciation and who is willing to pay more for superior work. So by all means - price it higher, give it to someone you care about or keep it at home. Long time ago, my wife started picking the special gifts from the kiln gods and our house has many of the best pots I ever made because she has more sense than I do.
     
     
  6. Like
    Red Rocks reacted to hitchmss in Hot Wax For Bottoms Of Pots?   
    We use hot wax to resist the bottoms of all our wares. We make thousands of pots annually and I find it to be the most efficient and cost effective method. Time spent cleaning the bottoms of pots that have no resist means thats less time making pots, and glaze going down the drain.  Ive used different room temp resists before with less than desirable results. It takes some practice to dip the pots in evenly to produce a nice glaze line, and you need to be cautious about turning pots over too quickly otherwise a run of wax might be up the side of your pot, and we dip in our spray booth to eliminate fumes. True, hot wax is HOT, so dipping your fingers is no fun, so this method is not great for community studios with less exeperience. Always use a hot plate, and NO open flame.  Ive found that a true parrafin wax with a Melt Point of at least 130 deg is necessary to provide a surface that glaze will bead right off of, requiring just a 2 second swipe with a damp sponge to clean up any residue. Using scrap candles (scented or unscented) will give you headaches (literally and figuratively). We use to use Gulf Brand wax(too expensive ($4/lb), and slow to melt), but now by in bulk prill form($2/lb, melts quick). Wax suppliers can be found all over the country. If you end up with wax in an unwanted area, just run through bisque again. Good ventilation is a must for any kiln, so I dont have any problems with burning wax off in my kiln.
  7. Like
    Red Rocks got a reaction from Maddriel in The Guilty Pleasure   
    I really like NOT wedging and don't feel the sligthest bit guilty about it.
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