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yedrow

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  1. Like
    yedrow reacted to Bill Kielb in Variable glaze color   
    Tough to answer that question actually. Experience is best, trials are the best way and test tiles with good notes are super important. Experienced potters can tell you a lot of general properties of their glaze, but then again they have acquired the experience. Generalities for a celadon for instance might be darker color with more dramatic breaks and at some point perhaps too thick and it runs or crawls.
    Test tiles likely are the best solution, one, two, three dip and so on.
    Here is a shot of about 1/5th of the tiles from a Jon Britt workshop. Took him a long time to get this experience. If you go to a workshop you likely can gather some of that experience in on tenth the time or simply exchanging info with other potters often saves a bunch of time.
    you can also search https://glazy.org/search?base_type=460&production=false&photo=false Many have pictures and notes on application. All for no charge.
     

  2. Like
    yedrow reacted to liambesaw in Variable glaze color   
    Breaking glazes I've found are usually opacified with zinc or tin, but not always and not all of them do it.  I haven't noticed any chemical analysis that predicts it though.
  3. Like
    yedrow reacted to Bill Kielb in Help with old material   
    Thanks,
    we plan to do something more comprehensive and with more clarity and content. There are so many dependent issues with glazes our hope is to someday incorporate as much gathered knowledge from many sources into a series or chapters if you will, for beginners and maybe intermediates.
  4. Like
    yedrow got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Help with old material   
    I got time to watch that video Bill and it was wonderful!!! Thank's again!
  5. Like
    yedrow reacted to Bill Kielb in Help with old material   
    Might be me. It sounds like Stull and I use the Katz worksheet when possible. He provides it free on his website. We actually have a modified version of his sheet with his permission, and provide updates to a handful of  Folks in a small group that does personal  glaze research. Katz course is a Nice course on Claybodies and Glazes. Other than that I have posted a bunch of spreadsheets over time free to anyone who wants them.
    Katz Website https://www.ceramicmaterialsworkshop.com/resources.html
    over time  we have sought to incorporate as many aids  as practical for beginner potters
    here is a link to an early beginner video.  Surface Texture and durability were the intended focus to the intro.
     
    If you have a need for any of the sheets, message me. Hope that’s what you were  seeking,
     
  6. Like
    yedrow got a reaction from Hulk in Help with old material   
    Thanks Bill. I don't think it was you, but that looks like some awesome material to go through. Thanks again!
    Joel.
  7. Like
    yedrow got a reaction from keith barber in 12 Inch Club   
    Just a tad under 12 on one try, three pulls, with a bottom.
     

      Joel.
  8. Like
    yedrow got a reaction from Rex Johnson in Potters wheel comparisons   
    I do not recommend a Pacifica, we have one that is just a few months old and already we've had to replace the pedal and it feels like the bearings are going out. I don't like Brent for production use, but I think it would be a great studio wheel, and I like their kick/electrics. I know two production potters who love their VL Whispers, I personally don't like the RKs. I know one master potter who is pleased with his Bailey. I like the Soldner type of wheel, but they're a bit pricey for the average potter. Creative Industries makes cheap wheels, nuff said.
     
    I strongly recommend trying the pedal first. Lots of people talk about power, but if you have a weak pedal you are much more limited than if you can't throw a 50# block of clay. I know a 110# woman who can center a 6# chunk of clay as well as I can, and I'm a stout guy. Precision trumps power IMO. However, if you are planning on centering 15 or 20 pounds, you may want to go for a stronger wheel. If on the other hand you are planning on turning out coffee mugs and pie plates, a responsive pedal is top of the list. I can throw on anything, but a touchy pedal, well, it just makes pottery not fun.
  9. Like
    yedrow got a reaction from laughlin in Best Table for the Studio?   
    I've been using hardiboard for the top of my table for the last few months. It isn't plaster, but it works pretty good.
     
    Joel.
  10. Like
    yedrow got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in 12 Inch Club   
    Just a tad under 12 on one try, three pulls, with a bottom.
     

      Joel.
  11. Like
    yedrow got a reaction from Marshall5686 in Potters wheel comparisons   
    I do not recommend a Pacifica, we have one that is just a few months old and already we've had to replace the pedal and it feels like the bearings are going out. I don't like Brent for production use, but I think it would be a great studio wheel, and I like their kick/electrics. I know two production potters who love their VL Whispers, I personally don't like the RKs. I know one master potter who is pleased with his Bailey. I like the Soldner type of wheel, but they're a bit pricey for the average potter. Creative Industries makes cheap wheels, nuff said.
     
    I strongly recommend trying the pedal first. Lots of people talk about power, but if you have a weak pedal you are much more limited than if you can't throw a 50# block of clay. I know a 110# woman who can center a 6# chunk of clay as well as I can, and I'm a stout guy. Precision trumps power IMO. However, if you are planning on centering 15 or 20 pounds, you may want to go for a stronger wheel. If on the other hand you are planning on turning out coffee mugs and pie plates, a responsive pedal is top of the list. I can throw on anything, but a touchy pedal, well, it just makes pottery not fun.
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