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Member Since 30 Jan 2012
Offline Last Active Nov 29 2015 01:55 AM

#96021 Black Clay

Posted by Surubee on 19 November 2015 - 11:50 AM

Black clay that you find naturally is often black because of organic matter which will burn out when fired. The color could change to something brown or red after firing. One way you can test it is by making little cones and pinch pots which you fire first to bisque temperature, and then higher if it survives. You can also make a clay ruler to test for shrinkage and another piece to test the amount of water it absorbs after firing so you will know if it is vitrified.


To protect your shelves, make sure to fire the test pieces on a piece of scrap shelf or a pad of bisqued clay with raised sides. I have seen tests of these natural clays that have totally melted at high fire temperatures, but are great at lower temperatures. If it has a low melting temperature but a nice color when fired, you may be able to use it as a base for a slip or glaze.

#94878 Hydrobat Complaint

Posted by Surubee on 27 October 2015 - 01:16 PM

If they are not helpful perhaps you can try adding a little bit of clay to the batt pins to fill in the extra space before attaching the batt. I have several hydrobats and have found some of them fit better on the bat pins than others. The extra dab of clay on the pins usually solves the problem for me.

Good luck.

#84670 Newb All Over Again...

Posted by Surubee on 31 May 2015 - 10:48 AM

If you used to be able to throw evenly, you may need only need a little bit of practice to get back to it, and You-tube is great, but it may also help to check to see if your wheel is level. If it is not, you may find it more difficult to keep things centered and even when you throw.


Have fun and good luck with it!



#70905 Lets Do The Happy Dance

Posted by Surubee on 28 November 2014 - 04:08 PM

I also drive a long distance every week (80 miles each way) to get to a pottery studio that I like. It is worth the trip because of the positive atmosphere in the studio and their ^10 gas kiln that is fired on a regular basis. 


I also have a wheel in my basement, along with a very small kiln which I use for bisque firing, but I enjoy the community environment and that makes the 2.5 to  3 hour drive worthwhile - at least for now.