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Darcy Kane

Member Since 29 Jan 2012
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 11:05 PM
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#72049 Does Your Exuberance Show In Your Work?

Posted by Darcy Kane on 17 December 2014 - 10:25 PM

It is odd that you would mention exuberance coming through our work because at my recent jury experience, my jury said that they would like to see more of my "exuberant, upbeat, bold, personality" in my work (must have been that second shot of espresso).  I tend to be very functional in my approach to pottery and I'm comfortable  viewing my work that way, so I am having to push myself a bit to think of how I can manipulate the forms and glazes I like to incorporate more of my "me-ness."  I'm playing with a few things but I am also not set on change for change's sake.  It is a balancing act to be sure.  Sometimes work become contrived when an artist strives to receive the accolades of colleagues.  That is a pit I will not fall into.  However, I do believe challenging one's self to grow and move forward isn't a bad thing.  I actually agreed with their assessment and will push to make some positive advancements in my work while maintaining a functional foundation.




#71847 Help! Accidentally Glazed Together My Pieces

Posted by Darcy Kane on 14 December 2014 - 10:12 AM

You really have two clear choices, leave it as it is and love your new paperweight; or, have at it with a wooden rolling pin or piece of closet pole.  I use a 12 inch piece of old closet pole and start by gently tapping it all around the edge.  The gentle tapping ramps up as needed to achieve the goal of separation.  I have never ruined a piece doing this and if I were to break one, it would be too bad, so sad, but at least I wouldn't have to look at it and be reminded of it for the next zillion years.  My husband always cringes when he sees me to it, but so far I've been successful.  In this case however, prevention is worth a pound of cure  :D  




#71352 New Potter: Advice Appreciated!

Posted by Darcy Kane on 06 December 2014 - 06:32 PM

 

Also, I'm guessing your wife works?  Can you get health insurance through her job?   I pay $550/month for health insurance and it's going up 15% soon.   Do keep in mind health insurance is a tax write off, as are a lot of other things.    Looking at Gep's $50k a year production to net $36K is probably a good number.   Remember you have lots of write offs. 

 

 

I read through all three pages on this thread and over and over my "mom" voice kept shouting in  my ear, "do you have insurance, do you have a plump saving account, does your wife have a great stable well paying job with good maternity leave/benefits, and are you willing to eat beans and rice for a few years, and will she not get pissed when she is working 9-5 so you can follow your passion?"  Most artists and potters that I know have more than one job.  They may teach pottery, or run a gallery, or teach art in a school, or have a studio, or or... you get the picture.  Most have other forms of income.  I personally work two jobs and I choose not to give up either of them because I love them both, but not everyone wants to work two completely different professions and make pottery as well :)  I will caution you that often when you have to produce enough pottery to make a living, it stops being a calling/passion or way to express yourself, and becomes a J O B. That was an epiphany I had when someone ordered 12 dinner plates and I was in the middle of trimming them.  Personally I like pottery too much to allow it to become more of a job and less of a vehicle to channel my artistic energy.  More power to the people that can successfully balance the two AND manage to live off the income from pottery alone.  Clay for me allows me to make a nice side income, but I can still work a job that has benefits, and have time to ride my bike, play golf, and go to the beach and not spend all my weekends setting up tents and selling pots.  Geez, I guess I'm just a hobbyist that sells her work.  Best of luck whatever road you choose and I will say after 33 happily married years, always put your relationship and family first.




#71155 Your Fav. Glaze / Glaze Combo

Posted by Darcy Kane on 03 December 2014 - 09:05 AM

I haven't ever used commercial glazes but I can add my voice to the choir for John Britt's Mastering Cone 6 Glazes and his new book Mid-Range Glazes.  I bought MC6 in digital format my iPad as it is out of print (in color) and I wanted color pictures.  I'm sure if you ask to see pictures of people's favorite glaze combinations that DIDN"T come commercially you would get a hearty response.  




#64079 What Are You Working On?

Posted by Darcy Kane on 06 August 2014 - 09:50 PM

I finally gave in to pressure from a few orders and sat down at my wheel this week.  I threw a bunch of stuff but here is a few of the things drying for the bisque.  Now if I could just get motivated to do some glazing.  I have about 4 kiln loads of bisque ware sitting on the shelves waiting for the mood to hit.  I hate glazing.  

Attached Files




#62759 Non-Legal Ways To Address Copying Issue

Posted by Darcy Kane on 18 July 2014 - 09:40 PM

Energy, both physical and creative, is a valuable commodity.  Letting this conflict suck energy away from what you want to be doing is much more harmful to you than her.  Make your peace with the notion that she can and will continue on her path, and you can either aid her and have some input into how she adapts the process/product to fit her own needs, or you can squander your time and energy trying to prevent the unpreventable.  I would share with her but then, I am a teacher by occupation as well as by nature, and can't keep a secret to save myself.  If I know it, I have to share it.  Collaboration is the lifeblood of education.  If I am excited about it, I feel the urge to share it all the more.  One of the things I enjoy the most about the clay arts is the willingness of potters to share.  A simple example of that is this forum.  Or, like others have suggested, move to a singular studio situation.  




#60529 Garlic Plates

Posted by Darcy Kane on 10 June 2014 - 07:31 PM

I have a friend who makes these and she has thick slip in a bottle and pipes a spiral of dots in the center of a small dish/plate.  She sells a buttload of them.




#58130 Maybe We Have Been Missing A Trick.

Posted by Darcy Kane on 08 May 2014 - 07:08 AM

These must be the same people that eat all the paste.




#57337 Foot Rings And Puddles

Posted by Darcy Kane on 25 April 2014 - 07:46 AM

I do my best not to be the one stuck emptying the dishwasher, but when I do end up with the job I hate the puddles that form on the bum of bowls and mugs.  I usually use a dishtowel to mop up trapped water before removing the cups/mugs/bowls.  I make a majority of my pieces flat on the bottom so they don't need to be trimmed but occasionally one has to use a foot.  I don't remember where I saw it, but some ingenious potter put a few small notches in the foot ring to let the water drain out.  I might see if I can incorporate a notch or two with a signature, two birds; one stone sort of thing.  Anyone else cooked up a good solution to trapped water?

 




#57260 What To Make?

Posted by Darcy Kane on 24 April 2014 - 07:36 AM

There are at least two types of people in the world, those that follow the rules to the letter and never deviate from the norm, and those that can get the job done and fool around a bit in the process.  Guess which group I fall into‚Ķ  To those that find the silliness inane and beneath them, I do not apologize for my outlook on life and I won't let you bully me into changing.  That said, I think shitton is preferable to crapton because it can be employed in two ways.  Shitton as in a LOT, or shitt on as in how one can be made to feel when enough negative people gang up and try to squash a bit of good hearted tomfoolery.  Great word, tomfoolery.  Thanks for that Stell.

 

On a pottery note, yes the bullets are simple closed forms with holes cut into them.  Some I stamp, some I add handles, and I make a variety of sizes.  

 

Attached Files




#57210 Reduction - What Is It Good For?

Posted by Darcy Kane on 23 April 2014 - 01:55 PM

From the title of this thread...... I want to reply :

 

"Ab-so -lutly nothin'.  Say it agin ya-all.  "  (Only the old folks might get this ;).

 

Got it, loved it, and killed a few brain cells listening to it :D




#57175 What To Make?

Posted by Darcy Kane on 22 April 2014 - 09:07 PM

Attached File  553524_4381992156524_1136254766_n.jpg   48.6KB   2 downloadsOh I forgot to answer the question, when in doubt I make flower bullets.  People love em and they are fun to make.

 




#55660 Using A Dust Mask, Breathing, And Seeing At The Same Time. Is It Possible?

Posted by Darcy Kane on 28 March 2014 - 07:11 PM

My husband the Safety Professional concurs with John on Northern http://www.northerns...g-kits-supplies saying they have a plethora of respirators/filters/good prices/and speedy delivery.  He said the one he ordered for me was a small and he insists I wear it snugged up tight.  He also insisted that I buy one and use it even for the littlest jobs.  Remember, you only get one set of lungs.




#53503 Help. Where To Start? Clay-Firing

Posted by Darcy Kane on 26 February 2014 - 06:36 PM

There are zillions of videos on youtube on how to convert an electric kiln to gas.  You may be able to pick up an old beat up electric kiln from craigslist, convert it to gas, and see if you are going to like it before investing (and we are talking $$ here) in building a kiln.  As far as clays go you do need to decide what cone you plan to fire to and many clays will work for reduction or oxidation.  If you are looking at gas you will be firing in  reduction.  Read down through the clay descriptions and find one that is for wheel work and fires to the cone you are interested.  I would ask your clay supplier for a recommendation.  They will know what their clients like best.

Again, you can watch videos on youtube and get lots of free instruction but remember, often free advice is worth exactly what you pay for it :)  I too first learned to throw in high school and then took weekly private lessons from a potter whose work I admired.  Her technical skills are impeccable.  That may work for you if you cannot find a community college or art center to take lessons at.

You may also want to consider picking up some raku clay and do some pit firings just for the learning.  

Working with clay is a real roller coaster, complete with great highs and low lows with a pretty steep learning curve.  And, considering potters work with "dirt" it isn't cheap to gear up for.  Enjoy the adventure.




#52749 You Know You're A Real Potter When....

Posted by Darcy Kane on 17 February 2014 - 10:31 AM

You know you're a potter when each step could hold the mistake you are looking for.

and you know it when you see it!