Jump to content


Seasoned Warrior

Member Since 02 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Oct 17 2013 10:10 AM
-----

#13612 Plus minus ratings system

Posted by Seasoned Warrior on 15 February 2012 - 01:27 PM


Don't even like herring with sour cream ... Vodka chaser? :)
You are so obviously not the type to hit a button and hide ... I always enjoy your posts


As one of those people living within the Swedish culture.... I'm starting to think... why are we now getting drug into this issue and 'put down' on this board ... it wasn't enough that the Republican party had to continually slam this country as being Socialist (aka Communist in their eyes), though it is actually a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary democracy that maintains some social programs just like the U.S. (i.e., Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, Unemployment, etc). It no longer supports that earlier 'Cradle to Grave Welfare system' that so many of those talking heads keep trying to frighten the American populace with... though in retrospect it is nice to know that the lack of homeless and starving people in the country is because of a more compassionate state of awareness.

HA HA! .... Just kidding, Chris! I take no offense to your remark or anybody else's as far as that goes! And having grown up in the desert area of Eastern Oregon where fish was not a staple of the diet, I have also learned to eat and LOVE herring (we call 'sill'). Not with sour cream...(as Charles said, 'yechhhh!')... but with a wonderful mustard sauce or tomato sauce and not with Vodka but with a good shot of Schnapps. Posted Image But we all have different tastes, because we ARE human!

On topic, I understand how some could be offended with the 'sophomoric' point rating system attached to this website. Too bad the programmers of this system won't remove it. For the most, I think those that are actually using this site are beyond the infantile thinking that desires to have a 'likability' factor association. I too, feel it has no place here, as this forum has proven itself to me to be more helpful than any other that I've ever been linked with. The amount of wisdom, sharing, professionalism, and consideration of other members rates the highest I've personally witnessed. With 6,950 registered members (at present and growing), there will always be some that, through a measured level of anonymity that these forums and the internet maintains, feel that apparently they are a part of 'the group' by voting on comments, without having to make comments. I've seen the diversity of answers/responses on this forum as being a great boon and enjoy the fact that people don't mind posting alternative answers, that they've gleaned from their experiences.

Like others, I was unfamiliar with this 'voting' thing until it was pointed out earlier ... along with the 'stars' (whatever they're supposed to symbolize). The communal sharing of advise/experiences has nothing to do with these type functions.

However.... we should Bless people (I won't mention any names, Marcia--Posted Image) who 'in consideration of total fairness' elect to give themselves negative points. What a kind soul!Posted Image

I'm sure we can continue on this website with the same level of professionalism and considerate sharing of advise and experience that has made this site such a treat. And I do hope and know that we will continue to attract other serious and professional ceramic minded folks as the one that we just sadly lost with this issue.

Meanwhile, maybe Sherman, Jennifer and/or Bill could press upon the programmers to eliminate this annoying little feature. As artists, don't we get enough criticism from the public and art world through our sales and exhibitions? Should we really feel content with the anonymous unsolicited/unwarranted criticism from our supposed ceramic peers?


Great post AmeriSwede! I'm glad that you have pleasant memories of childhood delicacies. My maternal grandparents were Russian and most often when we visited my grandparents my grandmother would deploy her latest gourmet acquisition. These acquisitions usually consisted of smoked herring, pickled pigs knuckles and various other items I am hard pressed to identify and translate. My Grandmother would unwrap the smoked herring, tear of a piece and stuff it in my face with the imprecation "Eat" so I have developed a bit of a reluctance to consume these things based on childhood trauma. I have since had smoked herring and while I still don't put it on my grocery list I can at least tolerate it unlike some of the other items. I have since embraced other cuisines (Chinese and Mexican in particular) but the mention of Russian food generally causes me to head rapidly in the opposite direction.

regards,
Charles





#13578 Plus minus ratings system

Posted by Seasoned Warrior on 14 February 2012 - 09:41 PM

Are we really going to get our knickers in a twist every time someone hits the ratings button? :mellow:

This forum has been the most respectful public forum I have been on. Unfortunately that feature is built into the software and some people hit it for reasons unknown. They might think they are saying they don't agree with the post but are not commenting on the person behind it. Maybe there are even a few who hit it to stir things up or push someone's buttons in a passive aggressive anonymous way ... BUT ....the majority here are excellent folks who honestly want to help and we shouldn't be judged by a few random acts.

As Mea says, only post messages you believe in and stand behind.
Then, does it matter if someone clicks that button? Unless they have the courage to honestly stand up to state and defend their opinion I don't think it counts at all.


I was not sure if that was what the buttons stood for and I am not sure what it means to have a number as a reputation. No shy violet here, I tell people what I think, I do it directly and be done with it! if you disagree with it I may agree with you or stand obdurate. Regardless I never devolve into obscenities, name-calling or dragging red herring! Never cared much for herring anyway!

regards,
Charles




#6502 Castable Recipe For Pizza Oven

Posted by Seasoned Warrior on 20 May 2011 - 01:15 PM

I've got a bunch of leftover hard brick from an old kiln that I tore down and want to build a pizza oven in my backyard. I'm planning on using brick for the floor and the door, but want to use castable for the dome. Does anyone have experience with this? I've found this formula for kiln castable, but was wondering if there are any specifics that I need to keep in mind when thinking about pizza as opposed to pots.

2 Fireclay
2 Grog
2 Sawdust
1/2 Alumina Hydrate
1/2 Portland Cement

Thanks in advance,
Mark



I am in the process of building a wood-fired oven and pizza is of particular interest. I spent quite a bit of time traipsing through the Yucatan. In the Yucatan I visited a while with a baker's family and witnessed the construction of a commercial wood-fired oven which was very interesting. They are so efficient that a hand full of sticks can actually keep the oven hot for hours and then they plan their baking based on the heat need as the heat decays through the day. The one thing I am going to use in my oven based on that visit however is rock salt for the floor. That is the same thing they use in the Yucatan. The salt floors are glass smooth and retain heat for an exceptionally long time.

Regards,
Charles


#5183 Mold Release Materials

Posted by Seasoned Warrior on 15 February 2011 - 01:00 AM

Thanks Marcia and bciskepottery. Murphy's Soap works fine as a release even diluted. I got nice reproduction and release even with a 10% solution. Thanks. I did notice that it tends to foam if not applied carefully.

Regards,
Charles


#5078 The Proper Inappropriate Use Of Tools

Posted by Seasoned Warrior on 10 February 2011 - 07:29 PM

The proper inappropriate use of tools

This is meant to be a fun post.. What unaltered tools are you using in your studio that are not designed to be used in a ceramic studio. I know that many of us use blenders and other kitchen tools. Let’s look a little further away from ceramic and share our fun unexpected tools and how they are used improperly. To make our life a little more enjoyable.

My tools

A leaf and branch chopper bought from Harbor freight on sale for about $70.00 used to grind bone dry green into a finer powder for repugging, making casting slip, making dry clay dust to wedge wet clay.

A small cement mixer for making dry glaze supplies, slips, and such

Just to name two, please note that safety concerns apply, and a good dust mask is needed with both tools

What are you doing

Tom



One of my favorite tools is the micro surform tool from Lee valley It is wonderful for shredding things and for using as a file. It is also the best cheese grater I have ever used although it is not designed for it and I suggest that you get two, one to grate clay and a different one for cheese.

Another device and I guess you could call it a tool is a Becton and Dickenson 2cc glass syringe with an adrenalin needle. the needle is the one used to inject adrenaline directly into the heart of a heart attack victim about 4' long with a realtively large bore. I like them because they are easy to clean the Luer lock needle can be easily changed and it makes fine lines with slip or glaze. It is a dream to trail slip with.

I also love my Wood working tools and while they may not be used directly on clay I make my own wooden ribs. I make turned models on the lathe, and I don't knwo what I wold do without my band say and my table saw.

Darn I also like my metal workign tools in actuality I work in different media dependign on what i want to achieve and I guess the lines of demarcation have become so blurred in my mind that I use things interchangeably as the need comes up. I even been known use my pot smelter for a raku oven! I'm just a mess Posted Image

Best regards,
Charles


#2227 Making Slip

Posted by Seasoned Warrior on 20 August 2010 - 04:03 PM

Since you are beginning you may wish to use tri-sodium phosphate as a deflocculant as opposed to buying sodium silicate. the tri-sodium phosphate is also known as TSP and is readily available in hardware and paint stores. You don't need much, percentually speaking. When I make up casting slip from local clays I have found that a one quater of a cup to 5 gallons of slip is more than adequate. The deflocculant aids in keeping the particles in suspension otherwise the clay particle precipitate readily.

Regaards,
Charles