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Pres

Member Since 02 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 07:31 PM
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#120715 Cone 6 Firing Schedule- Nerds

Posted by Pres on 16 January 2017 - 05:26 PM

Nerd, I have always fired by the . . . seat of my pants. The glaze loads are fired using a short water smoke of one hr, to make certain all glaze is dry. Then a 70% to red orange heat, then full up to yellow, backing down to 90% til ^5 goes down, backing to 80% for ^6. This usually allows for ^6 45" to 1 hr later. Then I do a cool down at 30% til at red orange. Most of this control happens with the kiln temp color, and even though not rocket science perfect, pretty dang accurate as long as the cones are there. I have had problems in the the distant past with pinholing, color immaturity, and lack of proper crystallization of glazes from too fast a move past ^5 and ^6. So made appropriate adjustments that have worked pretty well.

 

 

best,

Pres




#120606 John Baymore Solo Exhibition, Thayer Gallery, Ma Feb-Mar 2017

Posted by Pres on 15 January 2017 - 10:00 AM

More about the the show here, with some thoughtful artist's explanation:

 

 

https://www.thayer.o...yer-art-gallery

 

 

best,

Pres




#120488 Which Model Brent Wheel For School Use?

Posted by Pres on 12 January 2017 - 07:33 PM

Get 30 potters, and 30 educators in a room, and you will probably get a wide variety of preferences when it comes to wheels. The purists would gasp at anything but a kick or treadle wheel. Others would call sacrilege at adding a motor to anything. The teachers would groan at the space taken up by a kick wheel as in the old Amaco or Brent. Then we would be left with the 50 or so that would get a belt or gear driven electric wheel. Of these arguments of foot pedal sensitivity would come into play, along with needed horsepower and torque. Others would argue for quieter wheels, or heavier wheels, or larger wheel heads, or even a switch for right or left handed throwing. Still others would cringe at the use of splash pans. Others would argue for sitting vs standing wheels or the option to do both. Then we would have everything categorized and the final choice would come down to brand.

 

Over the years every brand out there has had good and bad years, and knowing what you want is not necessarily what you need, so the best choice is often an educated stab in the dark. We all have our dream wheel, and often end up buying it after much thought and probably several years of wishing. Hopefully that wish come true does not disappoint. I believe that forums like this help to cement the decision and make it easier to discern whether it is something we need, or want.

 

 

best,

Pres




#120413 Which Model Brent Wheel For School Use?

Posted by Pres on 11 January 2017 - 05:02 PM

I have purchased Baileys for budget concerns, back in the 90's. They are still running very well, and seem to have many more use in them. I have also had a CI and MP and HP, the HP is still ticking along very well, but the MP has been relegated to mostly trimming as everyone likes the larger motors on the Baileys and the HP. I spent many a day at Penn State with their model C wheels. They would take most of what I could do back then, and do it day in and day out with very little upkeep and much abuse that the under grads and grads put them through. My personal wheel is a CXC, as it will take everything and more this old guy can do on it. Never changed a belt yet, and it is over 20 years old.

 

 

best,

Pres




#120347 First Hard Paste Porcelain Made In Us Discovered

Posted by Pres on 10 January 2017 - 10:19 AM

Yes it does, nerd. Correct name is the State Museum of Pennsylvania.

 

http://statemuseumpa.org/

 

 

best,

Pres




#120269 Broken Ceramic Element Holders

Posted by Pres on 09 January 2017 - 01:31 PM

I have been firing an old L&L econo line now for over 30 years. It has has been overfired a few times, has had the bottom replaced 3 times, the lid now is a new one with two handles and thicker brick-no hinge. The element holders have been replaced in several places as the bricks have also. I have replaced all of the elements 3 times over the years. Thing is built to be repaired, even the electrical can be replaced. So take the extra time to call L&l, discuss your problems, maybe even send a picture or two, and let them tell you the best way to make your repairs. These kilns are too good to just toss, or make have shod repairs.

 

All my personal opinion,

 

best,

Pres




#120093 First Hard Paste Porcelain Made In Us Discovered

Posted by Pres on 07 January 2017 - 06:09 PM

My sister, Janet Johnson, a curator at the Pennsylvania State Museum sent me a note after I sent the article link to her. She states that the first attempt at porcelain was at Bonnin & Morris factory in Philadelphia. She also said that the museum had the best example of the work until this recent article and discovery.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

best,

Pres

Attached Files




#119925 Do You Stamp Your Website On Your Pots?

Posted by Pres on 05 January 2017 - 05:01 PM

Interestingly enough, with a good signature on the bottom of the piece, and the internet as a tool, most of us can be found very quickly. I am certain giving the web site is a great idea, but then the name gives you so much more if you are looking someone up.

 

 

best,

Pres


  • GEP likes this


#119463 Moving Studio To Montana

Posted by Pres on 30 December 2016 - 07:12 PM

I remember 212 well, years ago lost the brakes on my Ford Taurus wagon heading to Billings. On our way to North Dakota with my sister's family in another vehicle. They went on ahead while we had new brakes put onto the Taurus. The Taurus was known for short brake life, and I had put a few pairs on it already, but went to Midas and had a lifetime pair put on. Needless to say, free brakes and a few hours later we were on our way to Teddy Roosevelt Natl Park in ND.

 

Beartooth is one heck of a beautiful drive!

 

 

best,

Pres




#119357 How Do You Make These Lids?

Posted by Pres on 28 December 2016 - 11:56 PM

One way to do it, which I have done is too open the clay all the way to the wheel head, pull into a cone shape upward, upward, upward, neck in to bottle, then close completely. Use a rib to shape with the air pressure inside it is pretty easy. Then when leather hard turn upside down into a thrown chuck and trim . The gallery, can be trimmed into the lid also in this manner while trimming.

 

 

best,

Pres




#119165 Qotw: Is There No Qotw This Week?

Posted by Pres on 25 December 2016 - 05:56 PM

Evelyne, Take care, and be vigilant in your recovery. Take the time you need to heal up. I hope that the rest of you holiday season is more restful and festive(even though that is a contradiction of terms).

 

The forum will take care of itself, as you will of yourself.

 

Merry Christmas!

 

best,

Pres




#118983 Trimming Newbie: Securing The Pot Without Damaging It?

Posted by Pres on 22 December 2016 - 10:14 PM

Kraythe,

Even though I am a very big fan of the Griffin Grip, I taught all of my Ceramics 2 students to learn how to recenter a pot on the wheel, use chocks or water to hold it down, and trim in that manner. I also taught the more advanced ones how to throw a chuck to set a pot on or into to trim it. I can not stress enough the need for basic skills, and then when you understand how to use these, turn to the GG for situations that may require it. I still trim a lot of pots just by recentering by hand and trimming on a damp wheel head.

 

 

best,

Pres




#118818 Trimming Newbie: Securing The Pot Without Damaging It?

Posted by Pres on 21 December 2016 - 09:23 AM

Often when trimming, it is not your choice of timing when to trim that is at fault, but the way you allow the pots to set up before trimming in this crucial stage of drying. If you turn your pot upside down after they rims stiffen a bit, you will find that the rims will stay damper, but the area where you will trim will get dryier. So you rims will set easier on the wheel head, and not stick to your clay chocks or to the wheel head or get damaged because you are waiting till the bottoms are dry enough to trim but the rims get too dry. Turning the pot upside down will slow the drying of the rim because of the water weight traveling down in the pot. This trick should make trimming easier.

 

best,

Pres




#118753 Should You Think Production Process If You're Not A Production Potter?

Posted by Pres on 20 December 2016 - 10:30 AM

I taught for several years at a HS in Central PA. My intention with the students was to learn to throw, and understand what throwing well meant. I tried to demonstrate through my own activity an amount of frugality of motion and steps in pursuing a form. I put forth the premise that trimming did not make up for poor throwing, but that some forms needed more trimming than just an edge and bottom shaping. These include bowls and cantilevered forms. Even then, I emphasized the stresses put on the form by the extremes in cantilevering and in trimming without understanding what would happen in the kiln and the firing process.

 

I believe that trimming to form has its place, but as John and others will insist, poor habits are poor habits, crutches are crutches, and sometimes in order to run you have to learn to crawl and to walk in order to develop the skills to run.

 

 

best,

Pres




#118663 Re-Using Frozen Clay

Posted by Pres on 18 December 2016 - 10:59 AM

If you recycle normally, store the scraps outside, and recycle in the Spring as you would otherwise. Slake down the scraps let dry up a bit, re-wedge. Another trick that is pretty good, take out the sludge, and let it freeze in a block, Bring it in, put the block in a bucket on a riser of some sort, or even a screen over the bucket. when the clay thaws, the water that is frozen on the outside leaves and the clay left is almost as good as leaving it in the sun for a few hours.

 

 

best,

Pres