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Pres

Member Since 02 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Today, 11:39 AM
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#107796 Slurry Vs Water For Throwing

Posted by Pres on Yesterday, 12:21 PM

As I work, I find that the difference between using slurry and water is based more on what I am working with. When I start out, I often use water and that eventually becomes more murky slurry. However, when I am throwing larger, I find that slip does not work as well for me. It is the way the slurry holds the moisture against the pot, slowing drying and letting water absorb into the clay. When throwing larger I have a tendency to throw very dry, and slurry does not seem to work. I also do not like it as much when throwing bowls as the form has to have a max amount of stretch, and max support for the cantilever sides. When throwing cups, mugs, chalice parts, lids, neck rings or foot rings it really doesn't matter.

 

Hope  this helps you,

 

best,

Pres




#107629 Technical And Spiritual

Posted by Pres on 26 May 2016 - 10:59 PM

I sit down at the wheel, I have ideas in my head, the wheel goes round, and I go elsewhere. When I wake up there is a pot there on the wheel. Do I keep it or throw it, most times the decision is already made. Then comes the next steps in firing the kiln, and me knowing and feeling when the pot is bisqued right, when the glaze is on just right, and when the glaze fire is done and how it all has to cool properly. Spiritual, I don't know, but I know that I got rid of my own self expectations and learned that no longer how I feel, it all depends on something else.

 

 

best,

Pres




#107488 Qotw: Do You Have A Story For Us, Featuring Tom Roberts (Aka Tjr) ?

Posted by Pres on 24 May 2016 - 11:34 PM

I have been hurting over the last few days thinking over all of the memories I had of Tom.  We had often PMed each other over likes, then over teaching, and school, and retirement. Always a considerate gentleman, always aware of another persons feeling on line. It really came as no surprise for us to get together at NCECA  2015.  It was my first year on Advisory Board, and my first NCECA. Tom and I met at John Baymore's presentation; him looking for my hat, but I was holding it in my hands. We spent the rest of the conference together finding that we really had the same values and tastes in pottery and people. I was amazed at how many folks he knew, and that he treated me like I was just as important as any of them. We were instant friends. I missed him at KC, and found out why he could not make it just before I left. I really had no idea, hoping I guess that he would pull through. I have a deep sadness right now over the loss of Tom, but know that he must have had a lot of pain, remembering back to how he was limping even last year. He gave me a reason, and never let on. I'm sorry  I could not have been a better friend to Tom, and will miss him Oh so much. 

 

best,

Pres




#107205 Qotw: How Was Your Clay Journey Until Now?

Posted by Pres on 19 May 2016 - 06:40 PM

For most of my adult life, my clay journey has been crazy! I got paid to introduce hundreds of kids to ceramics. Through handbuilding with slabs, coils, pinch, extrusion and the potters wheel, I was able to have students explore functional potter, sculpture and decorative art. I had a studio with enough space for them to work, store their pots in progress, dry them for firing and for me to fire them in one of two kilns. I had equipment found mostly only in college studios or larger production studios: Slab roller, two Bailey extruders with multiple dies, two cone 10 kilns, 6 potters wheels, Walker pugmill, and a wedging table. We also had nearly every type of hand tool out there including hand extruders and griffin grips. I learned everyday from them, as they learned from me. We solved all sorts of design, and construction problems together and even created glazes together. We had fun in so many ways.  Life was so good! Now, after 36 years of teaching, I get to take time off, travel, enjoy bowling, kayaking, biking and other pursuits. Most of all, I get to spend time in my own studio making pots I like, taking jobs I want to do, and on occasion, going back in to schools to demonstrate, help with adult classes, and act as a resource for teachers in my area, and all over in the forums. . . . life is GOOD!

 

 

best,

Pres




#107022 Admire The Teachers

Posted by Pres on 16 May 2016 - 09:40 PM

Try to have her get in touch with her sense of touch. . ..blind fold her!

 

Really, it can give her a whole different approach to centering or even pulling. Also try to use her hands as tools so that she gets a feel for what should be happening with the clay in the process of throwing.

 

best,

PRes




#106754 Qotw: Did You Already Discuss Glazes With Aliens From Mars? (Wink)

Posted by Pres on 12 May 2016 - 08:28 AM

As I work at ^6, I can not choose one glaze, as all of my best pieces come from layering glazes, Rutile green over Speckled rust with a white liner underneath, and some shots of Variegated blue and green on a Hazelnut clay, some layers rubbed off, some left alone some dipped, some sprayed different angle and directions. No, for me there is not one glaze at ^6. Sorry it just 'nt gonna happen.

 

 

best,

Pres 




#106752 Submit Your Community Challenge Ideas

Posted by Pres on 12 May 2016 - 08:22 AM

Or even using the same technique/process in different ways to arrive at the same form. Ex. bowl thrown upside down and right side up, thrown with texture applied before shaping, thrown with texture after shaping, Thrown with double walls, thrown with colored combinations of clay, Thrown in multiple parts, Other variations I am sure are possible.

 

 

best,

Pres




#106673 Cracked Along Base And Side

Posted by Pres on 10 May 2016 - 09:34 PM

It may be an issue with the way your are throwing the casserole itself. If you are opening up, then deciding you need to be smaller and are pushing the clay back inward as you pull, you may have an uncompressed area in the base corner of the casserole. This will cause a crack between the pulled wall and compressed floor. Try opening a little smaller than the diameter you need then pull the clay outward to the diameter you need and then up, thus moving the clay particles up and around the base in a curve that organizes the particles at the corners, base an side wall. I had this sort of problem with casseroles years ago, and finally after changing a lot of throwing tactics to solve, came up  with that solution.

 

Of course as others have said, slow drying, flip as early as you can, and keep the water sopped up inside.

 

best,

Pres




#106066 Treadle Versus Electric Wheel - Any Advice Please?

Posted by Pres on 01 May 2016 - 02:22 PM

Often by the time you figure the space needed for a kick or treadle wheel, the expense of upgrading a kick with a motor at some time, and the effort involved in the use, buy another electric wheel used or otherwise. What brand is the one you had die? Could you post a pic? Why can't the offending part be sent out for repairs? 

 

Just thoughts, not to offend,

best,

Pres




#104951 Pottery Project Ideas For Kids

Posted by Pres on 09 April 2016 - 08:38 AM

I have a few projects I used for HS that would be appropriate. Check out my blog site.

 

best,

Pres




#104764 Qotw: Do You Sneak A Peek?

Posted by Pres on 05 April 2016 - 06:59 PM

Quickly through the peep hole with a flashlight. Really doesn't count. I found years ago that most of my glazes were better off if left alone for at least 24hr. Most of the time if the lid is cold, I open and unload. Sometimes I open and let cool further.

 

best,

Pres




#104476 Harry Davis,potter,engineer

Posted by Pres on 30 March 2016 - 10:00 PM

Another one you might like glazenerd if you don't have it is The Complete Book of Clay and Glazes by James Chappell. Excellent book on glazes, substitutions and clays.




#104331 Artsy Babble Translation Please

Posted by Pres on 28 March 2016 - 08:22 AM

Being an art teacher, I was required to have a number of courses in fine arts studio, art history, and crafts studio. It was always a question in the back of my mind "Why was not the crafts included or taught in an art history class. Most of what I got in the crafts was taught in the craft studio courses in relation to the craft being taught, never as a group or even in relation to fine arts. Maybe just the school I went to.

 

One thing I did realize after several years, my background in fine arts, and in crafts-particularly ceramics bled back and forth. As my feeling for texture in paint became more of interest, so did the need for it appear in my pottery. Same thing happens with color, line, counterpoint, emphasis and so much more. So the Voulkos quote is true for me, one of the few things I can agree with as I don't appreciate his work.  :wacko:

 

 

 

best,

Pres




#104289 Harry Davis,potter,engineer

Posted by Pres on 27 March 2016 - 10:11 AM

All three of these books, "Pioneer Pottery" by Michael Cardew, "The Potter's Alternative",  "Potters Dictionary of Materials and Techniques", have been on my shelves for many many years. They have only come down when I have been interested in perusing a particular topic, and they are usually by first go to. I will admit that the Potters Dictionary of Materials and Techniques is the one I go to most often, as I often have interest in looking up materials, cracks, decorating techniques, and oddities in that book. It is a treasure. 

 

 

best,

Pres




#104190 Whats In A Name

Posted by Pres on 25 March 2016 - 10:15 AM

Stephen, welcome to the next step of forum participation. . . recognizing that there are areas you should post in, and areas you are not comfortable offering information as you need it as much as giving it. I am much the same way in so many areas. When it comes to chemistry and physics of clay and glazes, I admit to being befuddled. Everyone here pretty well knows that! That is why I leave the heavy thinking to those so inclined to delve into the sorcery of that sort. Myself, I have some experience with a wide variety of equipment. Can fire an electric kiln reasonably well, and troubleshoot problems when given enough information on it. Throw and handbuild what I want without a whole lot of trouble. Can use some software and drawing and sketching to help me with ideas on paper in 2D, and 3D on paper and in software. As far as business sense, I also leave that to others.

 

The reason I am saying all of this is that most of us realize our strengths and weaknesses and post accordingly. There are a few that may stretch their knowledge, but usually not many. As far as problems on the forum if one makes a miss post or other stuff. Most folks here are very forgiving, but will correct you when you are. . . .really wrong. 

 

Moderators here have simple jobs, watch for spam, give input, keep things happy, watch for mishaps in postings like duplicates, misspellings in titles and other anomalies. We do on occasions have to deal with disputes, but most often that is easily taken care of. We look forward to folks who have things to contribute, comment on what they read, use the like this buttons, and enjoy the health and well being of a great group of people.

 

If more anonymity is your style, so be it. I was reluctant in the beginning to "put myself out there", but over time believed that some of what I said needed explanation of where I came from. So instead of referring every time I posted to my my past experience, I found that having a profile would clear some things up, as would having shots in the gallery. I still don't do facebook, or twitter or other social media, but do do a blog as it is still a way to teach.

 

So welcome, and hope you have many years of posterity, and can contribute well from your knowledge base to those of us on the forum.

 

 

best,

Pres.. . . . .short for Preston