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Pres

Member Since 02 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Today, 09:50 AM
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#124308 Recycling Clay - Turns Black And Stinky

Posted by Pres on Yesterday, 09:05 AM

There are times when this gets to be extreme. I had problems with this when after aging some slop that I had slaked down at the HS. I usually slaked the dry/leather hard clay together, and then let it sit for a few weeks to completely dissolve or soften. Then run through the pug mill.  Digging through the slop I found a lot of black veins running through a clay that usually was fine. Pulled on vein out with my hands grasping it, finding that someone had pitched a piece of paper towel into the barrel. Came to realize that we had been making slab forms over rocks, cylinders, and other items using paper towel as a release liner. On finished pots no problem as it burned out. On recycled clay-too much organic material in the clay causing the smell and black veins. Is it possible you have gotten some organic material in the clay?

 

 

best,

Pres




#124260 Qotw: Do You Have A Question For Us?

Posted by Pres on 24 March 2017 - 05:12 PM

Starting Tuesday, March 28th of 2017 I will be hosting the QOTW. I will post a question on Tuesday, and I will also be posting a pinned strand for folks to submit a question of the week. My reason for doing this is that I, like everyone else have my own preferences and areas of exploration. By requesting questions from those of you out there that have such a wide range of interests, we will have a much broader spectrum than if I posted only my own. I will reserve the right to choose from the listing, and maybe reward when I believe the question can be better written, but that is all. If there are no questions available, I will come up with one as with the post on the 28th.

 

 

best,

Pres




#124248 Favorite Tools

Posted by Pres on 24 March 2017 - 10:39 AM

Jamie,

Welcome, we try to help out.


  • Min likes this


#124227 Favorite Tools

Posted by Pres on 23 March 2017 - 09:41 PM

Love my bamboo spoon tools, but for those of you looking for more. . . 

 

http://bambootools.com/

 

 

best,

Pres




#124212 Favorite Tools

Posted by Pres on 23 March 2017 - 02:49 PM

ONe pic/thousand words

 

 

BT003-4S.jpg

 

best,

Pres




#124107 Favorite Tools

Posted by Pres on 21 March 2017 - 03:09 PM

I have made a series of bamboo ribs using the handles and the end pieces(spatula, spoon, etc.) cut up and reshaped as wooden ribs. The spoon bowl is a great rib for throwing bowls and for expanding cylinders on pitchers and large jars.

The spatula blade works well as a straight rib, and the way I have carved and sanded the end gives me a nice foot bead at the bottom of a pot. The handles work very well as knife ribs for cutting into the bottom of pots to trim excess, and do other jobs that are often done with knife shaped ribs.

 

best,

Pres




#124026 Claystories 3 At Nceca

Posted by Pres on 19 March 2017 - 10:34 AM

Remember the first NCECA I went to, first potters stories I think. Met Tom Roberts that week, and he told a great story at the meet. Miss that guy. :(

 

 

best,

Pres




#124025 Potters Council Members / Show / Reception / Portland Nceca

Posted by Pres on 19 March 2017 - 10:22 AM

I am already having NCECA withdrawal as I won't be making it this year. I can only console myself with the fact that next year is in Pittsburgh!!! I will miss seeing a lot of folks I have met at the past two, on the forums here. 

 

 

best,

Pres




#123919 How Do You Mark/sign Your Work?

Posted by Pres on 17 March 2017 - 08:56 AM

SignatureOnPlate.jpgJust to let you see how I have a tendency to sign them




#123866 Tea Pots

Posted by Pres on 16 March 2017 - 04:49 PM

I had a booth at Penn State festival years ago-mid 90's. In the heat of one day a guy came up the road stopping at potter's booths. He was carrying a bucket of water. He stopped at every potter, talked to the potter and then poured water into the teapots the potter had. He did this often enough that I had plenty of warning before he got to my booth. He was very nice, we chatted a while, and he told me he was buying a teapot or two, and wanted pots that poured well felt good, and were nicely finished. He asked if he could check out my teapots, as I had about 8 on display. Each one he poured from, making comments etc. He had a crowd behind him, really creating a scene in a lot of ways on a busy Friday. After pouring and perusing, without a word he bought three-the first three he had bought that day. He emptied his bucket, packed a pot in it, and carried the others in the bag I provided. Lucky me! The rest of that day all of my tea pots were sold. Science yes, luck even better, and I check everyone I ever sell to make certain it pours well, feels good, lid stays on, and the handle works. After a while it becomes second nature. However, every time I set out to do teapots it is a new challenge as it is usually only a few months of the year I do them.

 

best,

Pres




#123772 Tea Pots

Posted by Pres on 15 March 2017 - 09:17 AM

Ron,

Most of mine are closer to 3/8-1/2 when cut, then you remember that the shrinkage is around 18%.

 

best,

Pres




#123771 Qotw: What Shape Do You Prefer?

Posted by Pres on 15 March 2017 - 09:15 AM

I find that my skills and aesthetic tastes have changed so much over the years. When I first started out, I was interested in throwing cylinders, and that also included casseroles with lids. Most times lids would be included on almost anything. My prof in the undergrad school was from Alfred, and he always stressed people loving to lift a lid to look inside and that was a selling point. . . !. . .? The things we will believe when young! At any rate I made lot of pots with lids.

 

As my skills improved, I started making larger jars and such, early one were 18"-24", and then I learned about joining two sections, and about coil throwing. Jars went to 4-5' at State College. I soon got tired of that and went back to 24-30" jars, large bowls 36" diameter, and other things. 

 

Somewhere in the middle here I tried to do a teapot. .. .It was terrible. As I was not happy with my first effort, I read a ton of stuff, and then made a second, and a third, and. . . you get the idea.

 

Now I am trying to throw much looser, without so much worry about the perfect centering, or the mechanical precision of a pull, but just having fun, enjoying the feel of the clay. I impress into the wet cylinders before shaping, I gouge areas with tools, and then shape. I try to inflate the form as much as I possible can without it collapsing, sometimes even having to patch the holes that appear because of a stamp or gouge that was too deep. I'm having fun with the challenge of the inflated form, and hope to get more joy from it from day to day. The forms are bulbous, with nice necks, shoulder lines that define a border between the belly and the neck. The curve is extreme S in shape, but has irregularities in the belly from the marks that have expanded. I still have a lot to do with it, but then I am . . . . retired!

 

 

best,

Pres




#123768 Tea Pots

Posted by Pres on 15 March 2017 - 08:57 AM

I have been doing teapots with holes for years. Never had a problem with the glaze filling in. I guess I make my holes larger, and have a tendency of slightly beveling the clay around the hole-sanded the handle of the hole cutter rounded at the base. I really don't care about tea leaves so much, but find that the clay area is firmer for me to add the spout on to the teapot with the clay(even though holey) there to work with. This gives me added support that a large open hole does not have. I have a tendency to have a large area of holes, and a large spout base, as I like the amount of pressure this builds behind the spout so that the tea arcs out when pouring.

 

 

best,

Pres




#123309 Tell Me How To Brush Glaze

Posted by Pres on 06 March 2017 - 10:48 AM

Doc,

You do not brush on a glaze. You have to flow the glaze on to the pot. It is much different than painting a wall, or a piece of paper. The bisque fired clay in itself absorbs quite quickly the glaze, so a brush stroke has a very short duration. Some ways to help you have already tried. However, have you washed the pot with a damp sponge first.  . . . thus putting some moisture into the dry surface? Do you use a large soft brush to gather a lot of glaze to flow onto the pot? Do you brush in one direction, not trying to get the most out of the glaze. Do you apply three brushed coats to the surface? (One dipped coat usually is equal to 3 brushed coats.) Do you try to glaze the entire surface as a whole, not fussing with one area or another. Do you start the second coat in an area that looks thinner than most of the first, and the third coat in an area thinner than most of the second? 

 

These are all things that will help in practice, but now you need the skill of knowing when the brush is no longer flowing on the glaze, how much pressure to use, when to reload the brush, and what to look for in streaks that will effect the fired result.

 

best,

Pres




#123307 What Is Wrong With This Glaze?

Posted by Pres on 06 March 2017 - 10:36 AM

If you want to alter your white, try blending other opacifiers. Try a triaxial blend with your base, and tin, zircopax and titanium as your 3 "colourants." It can change the quality of your white, which can sometimes shake things up.

I have been using two opacifiers together for a few years now. It allows the glaze to be more gray white, creamy white, or plain white. At the same time, always remember that any liner or white glaze if highly effected by the clay body underneath. I have used some of my regular whites used on a hazelnut brown clay body on a white clay body, and they are so different, that I need to rethink the glazes for the white before running any more tests.

 

 

best,

Pres