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Pres

Member Since 02 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Today, 08:58 AM
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#110486 Skutt or L&L?

Posted by Pres on 24 July 2016 - 03:07 PM

kdavitt22,

Reading the specs on the e28t in reference to the needed single Phase 240 and 208 voltage, it is not recommended for consistent cone 6 firing. I direct you to http://hotkilns.com/e28t-3. 

 

Now as to the condition of the kiln upon receive, I that is a problem. However, under all circumstances in my experience they have stood behind the product.

 

 

best,

Pres


  • GEP likes this


#110475 First Post, Seeking Feedback

Posted by Pres on 24 July 2016 - 09:21 AM

As everyone else has stated, the forms are strong in themselves. It is the use of the multiple or breaking glaze on the deep relief that causes a problem. Imagine what camouflage would be like on your pot. Your present treatment of the surface is much the same. Now imagine using a white interior as you have with possibly a pearl luster, and an exterior with a plane medium range color or unglazed, stained surface.  You have so many shadows produced by the deep relief, that not much is needed.

 

Good beginnings, and high hopes for your future. . . 

 

best,

Pres 




#110097 Do You Wrap Your Tools To Make Them More Comfortable To Hold?

Posted by Pres on 13 July 2016 - 09:30 PM

I approach the tool problem from a different angle. You know those really soft work gloves with the grip buttons on them, yep. Works real well for me. At the same time, I use a little over the counter arthritis cream on my hands before putting on the glove. 

 

best,

Pres




#110042 Managing A Peculiar Problem When Pulling Pots

Posted by Pres on 12 July 2016 - 05:53 PM

I'll post a bit of video in the next weeks or so.

 

Pres




#110016 Managing A Peculiar Problem When Pulling Pots

Posted by Pres on 12 July 2016 - 08:13 AM

Over the years, I have used a sponge, moved to a knuckle, and now use an index finger tip supported by my thumb. Years ago throwing was not much of a problem-other than lack of experience. Now, because of nodules on my finger tendons, my fingers will snap at inappropriate times causing a gouge. So the tension of pushing the finger tip against the thumb helps to keep from doing that. The knuckle technique works also.  Quite frankly, what you are dealing with is not unusual, especially for potters that now know as "seniors". :unsure: I guess the golden years have some tarnish on them. Go figure.

 

best,

Pres




#109872 Spraying Mugs.

Posted by Pres on 08 July 2016 - 06:44 PM

Spraying mugs has their own problem, and as Johnny alludes to setting the piece up on turntable helps, I use an upside down small bowl to do this, I spray with the turntable moving slowly, changing direction often,with the gun angled away from the mug so that the spray hits the mug going away or coming in toward the sprayer. I try not hit the handles directly by turning off the spray over the handles trying to hit the mug itself. After setting up a sufficient coat on the mug, and the inside edge of the handle. Then I take time to work my spray on the handle itself. Big deal is distance for spray, and if you have a sprayer that allows for some head control. I prefer to not get any closer than 12" and do not allow my spray to get puddly on the pot. I apply a lot of textures to my mugs before shaping now and then spray different colors from different angles to bring up my textures.

 

best,

Pres




#109766 Qotw: What Form Do You Use To Experiment On A New Aesthetic?

Posted by Pres on 06 July 2016 - 01:30 PM

I usually start glaze testing with test tiles, and then move to small vessels about shot glass size, quick and easy off the hump. Then move to mugs and then teapots before trying glazes or processes on larger pieces.

 

 

best,

Pres




#109765 Correct Camera Lens For Product Photos?

Posted by Pres on 06 July 2016 - 01:25 PM

I personally use a zoom lens, usually to about 50-70mm to shoot my pottery. All depending on the size. You want to use higher f stops for depth of field, and make certain to have good lighting. 

 

You may find the following link of help also:

 

http://www.dpreview..../thread/3157898

 

best,

Pres




#109625 Qotw: Are We Potters Crazy?

Posted by Pres on 30 June 2016 - 07:49 AM

I used to love that sort of thing when in the classroom. Do a throwing demo, and then slice it right on the wheel to see the total dismay of all the on lookers. Other times when a pot of mine would come out of a glaze fire and have a flaw, and I would drop it right on the concrete floor . . . saying it could never be right so I had to redo it! Hmmm, thank goodness most of them now don't have flaws, and the ones that do my wife takes as hers!

 

 

best,

Pres




#109542 Qotw: Are We Potters Crazy?

Posted by Pres on 28 June 2016 - 01:03 PM

Crazy, Oh Yeah! I was glazing pots all day yesterday in the 85+ heat outside, Started up the kiln around 5pm, went bowling, then sat up with the kiln til 3am, then went to bed, got up with my wife at 7am to get breakfast, then went back to bed til just a little while ago. Crazy, who potters? 

 

 

best,

Pres




#109174 Artsy Babble Translation Please

Posted by Pres on 22 June 2016 - 07:54 AM

John,

That is a fine artist's statement. It lets me see what you see in wood firing, and expresses your enthusiasm and for the process and the way you connect wood firing to natural surroundings. I too have often looked at canyon walls and wondered how to express this in pottery.

 

 

Great job,

best,

Pres




#109173 Qotw: Would You Laugh At Me If I Told You That I Am Using A Gg?

Posted by Pres on 22 June 2016 - 07:50 AM

I have been using a Griffin Grip now since a few years after they came out. I thought they might help some of my students with their trimming.  After getting it, I realized that it was so good that they would never learn how to trim without one, so required them to trim at least 5 of their pots by hand before getting their grubby fingers on the GG. I have used it over the years to trim plates, bowls, mugs, trim and assemble chalices, It has so many uses in the studio, that I really can't name them all. It will not do everything, as I make some bowls that are larger than the diameter of the GG, and large jars and such are best trimmed in a chuck to keep the shoulder from collapsing on the neck. However, I would be much slower doing things the old way as I am using the GG.

 

 

best,

Pres




#108913 Qotw: What Is Your Biggest Safety Fault?

Posted by Pres on 17 June 2016 - 07:59 AM

Side plank dip is to do a plank on the side, body supported perpendicularly to the floor by elbow and feet. Drop hip to the floor, and raise, stop motion, and repeat. Done slowly it stretches the back, strengthens the core muscles. Hits lower than the push up. Some people think there is nothing to it, but I find it is good for me.

 

best,

Pres




#108810 Qotw: What Is Your Biggest Safety Fault?

Posted by Pres on 15 June 2016 - 06:07 PM

 

Thinking I'm bigger and stronger than I really am and wrenching my back muscles when lifting. That and procrastinating over doing core exercises to strengthen it.





Min, I'm thinking for the likes of you and I that we are never going to take time out to do exercises SO I'm working at incorporating the exercises into my days work....like lifting lots of little weights instead of the big oooomph jobbies, may mean taking clay one bag at a time instead of the 2 or three..... light stuff on high shelves
My have to write the book......
BUT there is always the reflex action you have to watch out for

 

I make it a point to at least get in my 50 push ups, and 100 side plank dips a night before bedtime. It helps. Summer months, kayaking a sea kayak is great core work if you paddle, and not coast. I love to race the sail boats in August.

 

best,

Pres




#108320 Reconstituting Bone Dry Clay

Posted by Pres on 07 June 2016 - 11:27 AM

An alternative to Neil's trick is to hang the pillow case outside in a shady area where the wind will get to it. The bag will evaporate water, the weight will drain out some water, and the clay will not have to be rotated very often. You can peel the bag off the clay when drier, cut and invert the outside to inside, slash cut the rest a few times and then pug, slash cut some more and re wedge.

 

best,

Pres