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Pres

Member Since 02 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 10:28 PM
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#109174 Artsy Babble Translation Please

Posted by Pres on 22 June 2016 - 07:54 AM

John,

That is a fine artist's statement. It lets me see what you see in wood firing, and expresses your enthusiasm and for the process and the way you connect wood firing to natural surroundings. I too have often looked at canyon walls and wondered how to express this in pottery.

 

 

Great job,

best,

Pres




#109173 Qotw: Would You Laugh At Me If I Told You That I Am Using A Gg?

Posted by Pres on 22 June 2016 - 07:50 AM

I have been using a Griffin Grip now since a few years after they came out. I thought they might help some of my students with their trimming.  After getting it, I realized that it was so good that they would never learn how to trim without one, so required them to trim at least 5 of their pots by hand before getting their grubby fingers on the GG. I have used it over the years to trim plates, bowls, mugs, trim and assemble chalices, It has so many uses in the studio, that I really can't name them all. It will not do everything, as I make some bowls that are larger than the diameter of the GG, and large jars and such are best trimmed in a chuck to keep the shoulder from collapsing on the neck. However, I would be much slower doing things the old way as I am using the GG.

 

 

best,

Pres




#108913 Qotw: What Is Your Biggest Safety Fault?

Posted by Pres on 17 June 2016 - 07:59 AM

Side plank dip is to do a plank on the side, body supported perpendicularly to the floor by elbow and feet. Drop hip to the floor, and raise, stop motion, and repeat. Done slowly it stretches the back, strengthens the core muscles. Hits lower than the push up. Some people think there is nothing to it, but I find it is good for me.

 

best,

Pres




#108810 Qotw: What Is Your Biggest Safety Fault?

Posted by Pres on 15 June 2016 - 06:07 PM

 

Thinking I'm bigger and stronger than I really am and wrenching my back muscles when lifting. That and procrastinating over doing core exercises to strengthen it.





Min, I'm thinking for the likes of you and I that we are never going to take time out to do exercises SO I'm working at incorporating the exercises into my days work....like lifting lots of little weights instead of the big oooomph jobbies, may mean taking clay one bag at a time instead of the 2 or three..... light stuff on high shelves
My have to write the book......
BUT there is always the reflex action you have to watch out for

 

I make it a point to at least get in my 50 push ups, and 100 side plank dips a night before bedtime. It helps. Summer months, kayaking a sea kayak is great core work if you paddle, and not coast. I love to race the sail boats in August.

 

best,

Pres




#108320 Reconstituting Bone Dry Clay

Posted by Pres on 07 June 2016 - 11:27 AM

An alternative to Neil's trick is to hang the pillow case outside in a shady area where the wind will get to it. The bag will evaporate water, the weight will drain out some water, and the clay will not have to be rotated very often. You can peel the bag off the clay when drier, cut and invert the outside to inside, slash cut the rest a few times and then pug, slash cut some more and re wedge.

 

best,

Pres




#108138 Microwave/oven Safe?

Posted by Pres on 04 June 2016 - 08:59 AM

Years ago, before I started to sell at shows, I used a white stoneware clay that had a wide range of maturity. I also was making up a Bristol type glaze for over the body with underglaze decoration applied over the glaze as in-glaze. Over the years of use, we found that the clay body absorbed water from the dishwasher as the bottoms felt damp, the Bristol glaze crazed, and the surfaces got dull. Mind you I did not use any of the underglazes inside of the containers or near the rims, but those things were highly noticeable. I determined that the wide maturity range was partly at fault, that the Bristol glaze had issues as formulated, and that there were other problems with my method of decoration. Sometimes you get stuck in a rut admiring what you think is really nice, good work, and find that your perceptions are flawed not by the work itself, but the attributes inherent in the work from materials. When using commercial glazes or underglazes you depend on the suppliers/manufacturers integrity, as you are when you use clay bodies from a commercial manufacturer. Best to research your materials, test their integrity, and have chemical analysis done when in doubt. I do preliminary testing on most every thing anymore with vinegar, and dishwasher detergent baths on test tiles of new glazes and clay bodies. If they fail this, then no need to send them out for further analysis.

 

 

best,

Pres




#108086 Qotw: Are You Already "thinking Big"?

Posted by Pres on 03 June 2016 - 02:38 PM

I had courses in the summers at Penn State. Not a good time to take classes, and definitely shortened. However, I did have a very good experience when Ron Gallas was an adjunct professor there one year, I think around 1975 or 76. He really put us through more of an academic exploration of knowledge and techniques.

I ended up leaving PSU before entering into a program as I was not available for an MFA, and the ED department was demanding more pedagogy than I was willing to commit to. I believed and still do that art teachers must have a well rounded background in the arts and crafts, and a specialization in one of the arts or crafts.  Theory of teaching is a great thing to have, but in the long run if you cannot succeed every time you demonstrate, and do not have breadth and depth of knowledge all of the pedagogy in the world will not do a bit of good when standing in front of a bunch of teenagers.

 

best,

Pres 




#107959 Technical And Spiritual

Posted by Pres on 01 June 2016 - 09:35 PM

Stream of Consciousness and Right Brain thinking were concepts from the 70's and 80's. Personally I believe the last is especially true for me when dealing with the loss of time when working in the shop! At the same time I still feel the phrase "simply create" really doesn't cut it. 




#107796 Slurry Vs Water For Throwing

Posted by Pres on 30 May 2016 - 12:21 PM

As I work, I find that the difference between using slurry and water is based more on what I am working with. When I start out, I often use water and that eventually becomes more murky slurry. However, when I am throwing larger, I find that slip does not work as well for me. It is the way the slurry holds the moisture against the pot, slowing drying and letting water absorb into the clay. When throwing larger I have a tendency to throw very dry, and slurry does not seem to work. I also do not like it as much when throwing bowls as the form has to have a max amount of stretch, and max support for the cantilever sides. When throwing cups, mugs, chalice parts, lids, neck rings or foot rings it really doesn't matter.

 

Hope  this helps you,

 

best,

Pres




#107629 Technical And Spiritual

Posted by Pres on 26 May 2016 - 10:59 PM

I sit down at the wheel, I have ideas in my head, the wheel goes round, and I go elsewhere. When I wake up there is a pot there on the wheel. Do I keep it or throw it, most times the decision is already made. Then comes the next steps in firing the kiln, and me knowing and feeling when the pot is bisqued right, when the glaze is on just right, and when the glaze fire is done and how it all has to cool properly. Spiritual, I don't know, but I know that I got rid of my own self expectations and learned that no longer how I feel, it all depends on something else.

 

 

best,

Pres




#107488 Qotw: Do You Have A Story For Us, Featuring Tom Roberts (Aka Tjr) ?

Posted by Pres on 24 May 2016 - 11:34 PM

I have been hurting over the last few days thinking over all of the memories I had of Tom.  We had often PMed each other over likes, then over teaching, and school, and retirement. Always a considerate gentleman, always aware of another persons feeling on line. It really came as no surprise for us to get together at NCECA  2015.  It was my first year on Advisory Board, and my first NCECA. Tom and I met at John Baymore's presentation; him looking for my hat, but I was holding it in my hands. We spent the rest of the conference together finding that we really had the same values and tastes in pottery and people. I was amazed at how many folks he knew, and that he treated me like I was just as important as any of them. We were instant friends. I missed him at KC, and found out why he could not make it just before I left. I really had no idea, hoping I guess that he would pull through. I have a deep sadness right now over the loss of Tom, but know that he must have had a lot of pain, remembering back to how he was limping even last year. He gave me a reason, and never let on. I'm sorry  I could not have been a better friend to Tom, and will miss him Oh so much. 

 

best,

Pres




#107205 Qotw: How Was Your Clay Journey Until Now?

Posted by Pres on 19 May 2016 - 06:40 PM

For most of my adult life, my clay journey has been crazy! I got paid to introduce hundreds of kids to ceramics. Through handbuilding with slabs, coils, pinch, extrusion and the potters wheel, I was able to have students explore functional potter, sculpture and decorative art. I had a studio with enough space for them to work, store their pots in progress, dry them for firing and for me to fire them in one of two kilns. I had equipment found mostly only in college studios or larger production studios: Slab roller, two Bailey extruders with multiple dies, two cone 10 kilns, 6 potters wheels, Walker pugmill, and a wedging table. We also had nearly every type of hand tool out there including hand extruders and griffin grips. I learned everyday from them, as they learned from me. We solved all sorts of design, and construction problems together and even created glazes together. We had fun in so many ways.  Life was so good! Now, after 36 years of teaching, I get to take time off, travel, enjoy bowling, kayaking, biking and other pursuits. Most of all, I get to spend time in my own studio making pots I like, taking jobs I want to do, and on occasion, going back in to schools to demonstrate, help with adult classes, and act as a resource for teachers in my area, and all over in the forums. . . . life is GOOD!

 

 

best,

Pres




#107065 Admire The Teachers

Posted by Pres on 17 May 2016 - 10:37 AM

I demonstrated throwing in my HS classes-blindfolded! Trusting fool I was, but then they were so rapt up in the demo, never had a problem. Even had an administrator walk in one time while I was doing it, kids really got a laugh when I finally removed the blindfold and stammered my hello! Point is, getting anyone to rely on their sense of touch instead of their eyes is really most important on the wheel. We learn to judge depth/thickness by needle tools in the beginning, then graduate to doing it by feel. Hah, that old trick of touching your nose with your fingers with eyes closed. . . potters can do it everytime!

 

 

best,

Pres




#107022 Admire The Teachers

Posted by Pres on 16 May 2016 - 09:40 PM

Try to have her get in touch with her sense of touch. . ..blind fold her!

 

Really, it can give her a whole different approach to centering or even pulling. Also try to use her hands as tools so that she gets a feel for what should be happening with the clay in the process of throwing.

 

best,

PRes




#106754 Qotw: Did You Already Discuss Glazes With Aliens From Mars? (Wink)

Posted by Pres on 12 May 2016 - 08:28 AM

As I work at ^6, I can not choose one glaze, as all of my best pieces come from layering glazes, Rutile green over Speckled rust with a white liner underneath, and some shots of Variegated blue and green on a Hazelnut clay, some layers rubbed off, some left alone some dipped, some sprayed different angle and directions. No, for me there is not one glaze at ^6. Sorry it just 'nt gonna happen.

 

 

best,

Pres