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Pres

Member Since 02 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Today, 01:06 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Fall To Winter Projects

Yesterday, 09:29 PM

Update on a few of the ideas about heating the shop. Seems there is code against using a wood stove inside the borough! Second thought is that after talking to a local restaurant owner, propane is very plausible to heat the shop, and cheaper. He says that for <$500 I could put a tank in the back yard with a heater in the shop that would control the cold. Hmmm this makes me wonder about propane firing a kiln on down the road. Possibilities.  Oh yeah, the restaurant owner is a Fire Marshall for the area, so he may know what he is talking about, plus the fact that he used propane for his restaurant.


In Topic: Trying To Find A Square Plate Mould

Yesterday, 07:28 PM

Try a square piece of plywood on larger piece of plywood 3/8"-3/4" bevel the edges on a table saw, or add pieces of house molding to the edges for a sculptural edge. Get even more involved by using dremel, or carving tools to carve a design into the molding. Press slabs on, and away you go!


In Topic: Old Kiln Help

16 December 2014 - 05:04 PM

I happen to own a J236, which is similar to your kiln, more than you can guess. My kiln is probably one of very few that left the factory in PA without the kiln setter-special order. I have always believed in a longer cool cycle so ordered it so that it could be fired down (cooled slowly by ramping down the temp). I fire using cones which I peep through the peep holes. This allows me precise firings and coolings without the use of the setter. So your kiln even though the setter is broken, could be fired regularly. However, this often means late nights for me baby sitting the kiln carefully to make certain I do not over fire. It can be done.


In Topic: How To Slab A Round Cylinder

11 December 2014 - 10:07 AM

Over the years, I have used any round form I could find, as long as it did not have ridges and other things to  catch on the cylinder. Always would wrap with newspaper to allow easy release. Sometimes if the cylinder was large, I would join on the inside of the cylinder and then just let it get leather hard and the shrinkage would release it.

 

Finally for forms that were round in circumference , but where the form was a little bowed or other wise on the vertical, I would make the piece in two slabs, top and bottom. Slip each off individually, and then join together when leather hard.

 

Learning to work with forms while handbuilding is a big part of the process.


In Topic: Production Potter Productivity

10 December 2014 - 09:16 AM

The reason I focus on the amount of clay here at times is that it is an indicator of low throwing skills for making that size form.  A certain sense of appropriate "mass" can be understandable...... but if these are considered functional pieces.... personally I'd find 2.75 pounds totally objectionable for a form like that.  I'd think that better balanced forms would likely increase sales too.

 

 Additionally those size forms should require NO leatherhard trimming to reduce anything of the wall thickness.  Trimming should be mainly for aesthetic reasons.... finishing the foot area of the piece  ... not to compensate for leaving unused clay in the lower walls......and this also reduces labor on the per piece basis... increasing the end point productivity.

 

Maybe a management visit to another production facility somewhere is in order?   Here's a very successful long term hand production pottery:  CRAP... cut and past does not work for me since I upgraded to IE 11 .... have to type this in.... look up on Google ....... Salmon Falls Stoneware.

 

best,

 

........................john

As a side to John's comment, a well thrown 1lb mug will not be overly heavy and yet at the same time should not be overly thin. All too often those throwing a mug forget the purpose of a mug as to provide a vessel for hot liquid, a comfortable lip, a comfortable handle, and thermal insulation to keep the liquid hot on the inside and not burn the hand on the outside. All of this comes from good design of the form and good throwing. I personally like to hold a mug in my hand for the warmth as my hands are always cold! :rolleyes: