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Pres

Member Since 02 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 10:15 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Skutt or L&L?

Yesterday, 09:50 PM

Try the following link, and then scroll down to the e28T kiln.   http://hotkilns.com/...olr_search/e28T

 

best,

Pres


In Topic: Skutt or L&L?

Yesterday, 03:07 PM

kdavitt22,

Reading the specs on the e28t in reference to the needed single Phase 240 and 208 voltage, it is not recommended for consistent cone 6 firing. I direct you to http://hotkilns.com/e28t-3. 

 

Now as to the condition of the kiln upon receive, I that is a problem. However, under all circumstances in my experience they have stood behind the product.

 

 

best,

Pres


In Topic: L&l Kiln Or Skutt?

Yesterday, 02:55 PM

I have just finished making a series of repairs to my L&L. I have been firing this kiln since 1983. I bought it new, with no kiln setter, J236-48" deep with ability to handle a 5th section. Over the years I have replaced kiln elements, easy job. I have replaced the phenolic blocks, changed an occasional switch, and just yesterday replaced my first brick and element holder. The Hot kilns folks, helped me out with all of the repairs, using my serial # to make certain to get proper replacement parts. I also ordered 4 elements for backup as my present elements are holding within 10% of the 32 ohms expected. Al in all, this kiln has been fantastic, firing up and down as I wish, holding wherever I decide to hold, and able to fire^6 or ^6.5 easily for one who baby sits their kiln. In the day, programmable controllers did not exist. If I order a new one, it will be an L&L with full electronics. 

 

This has been my only personal kiln until I bought used Skutt that I have to repair the bottom bricks on. I am not looking forward to the job, but It will be nice to bisque in. At school I had used an Amaco for the first few years, then went to an L&L, and just before leaving the job had a new one running with the old also. All of these were 4 stacks high, and could fire a heck of a lot of student pots.

 

Yeah, I am an L&L fan, but then with my experience with them, why not.

 

best,

Pres


In Topic: First Post, Seeking Feedback

Yesterday, 09:21 AM

As everyone else has stated, the forms are strong in themselves. It is the use of the multiple or breaking glaze on the deep relief that causes a problem. Imagine what camouflage would be like on your pot. Your present treatment of the surface is much the same. Now imagine using a white interior as you have with possibly a pearl luster, and an exterior with a plane medium range color or unglazed, stained surface.  You have so many shadows produced by the deep relief, that not much is needed.

 

Good beginnings, and high hopes for your future. . . 

 

best,

Pres 


In Topic: Not So Messy Clay For Beginners?

22 July 2016 - 10:28 PM

As the others have eluded to, it is the nature of the beast, especially when you are a newbie. :) I have been throwing for a number of years, and still get messy when in my shop. When I demonstrated, everything was clean and very little slurry on my hands or any other "gunK".  Give it time, get the basics down, then start cutting back on the water you throw with. Best to do this by not throwing with a sponge, and using the smallest friction points you can on the clay surface when you pull. I use a pointer finger tip braced with the thumb on the outside, and my pointer of the left hand braced against the middle and ring finger on the inside. Good luck and happy throwing.

 

 

best,

Pres