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Pres

Member Since 02 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Today, 11:14 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Qotw: Epic Failures Anybody?

Today, 08:58 AM

Learned not to use the wheel as a shop table for use with the circular saw. Cut a very small notch out of the wheel head. Good news. . . after years I have found that the notch makes a perfect place to lift bats from with a trimming tool. In the future, I would put the notch in the bottom of the bat! :huh:


In Topic: Artsy Babble Translation Please

26 August 2016 - 09:08 AM

Animals often know more than you think. They know what their body needs at times. Cats and dogs eating grass. . . who knows. Always remember the one about the dog that got wounded by a bear and wandered off, only to be found near a river with a clay bank survived by rolling in the wet clay bank covering the wounds.   Who can figure why they do what they do, no accounting for instinct.

 

I am happy to read that I am not the only one who is tired of the dribble that is used to "invade" the artistic process by folks that have very little idea of what ti is all about, or were used to be's that now only write. Reminds me of "Fountainhead" by Ayn Rand.

 

 

best,

Pres


In Topic: Clay Firmness

26 August 2016 - 09:01 AM

When I get a bag of clay that is too hard, I just take some of the older softer clay from trim scraps that have been sitting around and "bread slice shuffle" them together. I turn this a couple of times cutting and slamming. Reshape it into two blocks and have 50# of good clay in a few days after spraying with a little water and placing in clay bag. Standard has dropped ties on bags several years ago-can be ordered for cost. However, I have been able to use the bags of clay after two years of storage outdoors under a tarp. In PA the clay does freeze and thaw a bit, but for some reason or other it is better for me after I re-wedge it out of the bag after a year than when fresh. I am not very big, or strong, but I like may clay quite stiff for jars, mugs and bowls. For plates always softer.

 

best,

Pres


In Topic: Narrowed It Down To A Couple Wheels?

26 August 2016 - 07:50 AM

I will take the different tack here as I do use a CXC. I have used this wheel for over 20 years now. I throw up to 25# on it and never have a problem, and never replaced a belt. I have the two piece splash pan, and clean it our weekly. It seals up well, and will hold a lot of slop. The griffin grip will set on the wheel without interfering. I also have a large trim box that I built that sets at the bottom of the wheel when not in use when I trim larger platters and bowls. This keeps trimming mess to a minimum. Which ever wheel you buy, all of the above recommendations are excellent. I really would suggest that you have a chance to try these wheels out at a ceramics store or some other place. Wheel fit is more than just the head and motor. . .height, fit where you sit, distance to the wheel head, and other things will influence your decision.  Other wheel I would recommend? Look at Bailey's Ceramic for large splash pans, and good torque at good price.

 

 

 

best,

Pres


In Topic: Qotw: Epic Failures Anybody?

24 August 2016 - 08:21 AM

I think one of my worst catastrophes was not in the studio, but pottery related. I was putting up a library showcase of student pots. This case loaded from the back. It had glass shelves on metal brackets that were movable that hung on rails in the back rails of the cabinet. Yeah you guessed it! I was putting one of the last pots on the top shelf, and the whole thing gave way somehow. Broke 4 large sculptural student pots and two shelves. It was a total disaster at the time. I spent the next month after school repairing the student pots with epoxy putty and super glue with touch ups with various acrylic paints to bring the pieces back to life. I told the students about the accident the very next day, as I did the librarian. I bought replacement shelves out of my pocket, and made hearty apologies all around. In the end all was good, the students said it really didn't matter, and the librarian would have replaced out of her budget. I knew it would have meant a few less books or materials. 

 

Over the years, I have spilled glaze containers(5 gal), blown up pots in bisque, had loads with spiral cracks in every large pot in it(bisque), fired an entire salt load with out the damper closed at any point, fired a salt with the door nearly collapsing at cone 7, and lost a box of pots when the van rear door came open going down the road. 

 

Its all about surviving. Surviving each day enough to learn from your mistakes and make the adjustments so it does not happen again.

 

 

best,

Pres