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Pres

Member Since 02 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 07:31 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Cone 6 Firing Schedule- Nerds

16 January 2017 - 05:26 PM

Nerd, I have always fired by the . . . seat of my pants. The glaze loads are fired using a short water smoke of one hr, to make certain all glaze is dry. Then a 70% to red orange heat, then full up to yellow, backing down to 90% til ^5 goes down, backing to 80% for ^6. This usually allows for ^6 45" to 1 hr later. Then I do a cool down at 30% til at red orange. Most of this control happens with the kiln temp color, and even though not rocket science perfect, pretty dang accurate as long as the cones are there. I have had problems in the the distant past with pinholing, color immaturity, and lack of proper crystallization of glazes from too fast a move past ^5 and ^6. So made appropriate adjustments that have worked pretty well.

 

 

best,

Pres


In Topic: John Baymore Solo Exhibition, Thayer Gallery, Ma Feb-Mar 2017

15 January 2017 - 10:00 AM

More about the the show here, with some thoughtful artist's explanation:

 

 

https://www.thayer.o...yer-art-gallery

 

 

best,

Pres


In Topic: John Baymore Solo Exhibition, Thayer Gallery, Ma Feb-Mar 2017

15 January 2017 - 09:57 AM

Excellent! Hope to see more pictures as soon as possible.

 

 

 

best,

Pres


In Topic: Which Model Brent Wheel For School Use?

12 January 2017 - 07:33 PM

Get 30 potters, and 30 educators in a room, and you will probably get a wide variety of preferences when it comes to wheels. The purists would gasp at anything but a kick or treadle wheel. Others would call sacrilege at adding a motor to anything. The teachers would groan at the space taken up by a kick wheel as in the old Amaco or Brent. Then we would be left with the 50 or so that would get a belt or gear driven electric wheel. Of these arguments of foot pedal sensitivity would come into play, along with needed horsepower and torque. Others would argue for quieter wheels, or heavier wheels, or larger wheel heads, or even a switch for right or left handed throwing. Still others would cringe at the use of splash pans. Others would argue for sitting vs standing wheels or the option to do both. Then we would have everything categorized and the final choice would come down to brand.

 

Over the years every brand out there has had good and bad years, and knowing what you want is not necessarily what you need, so the best choice is often an educated stab in the dark. We all have our dream wheel, and often end up buying it after much thought and probably several years of wishing. Hopefully that wish come true does not disappoint. I believe that forums like this help to cement the decision and make it easier to discern whether it is something we need, or want.

 

 

best,

Pres


In Topic: Wooden Throwing Tools

12 January 2017 - 09:09 AM

I use a furniture finish from IKEA on my tools of late, it is just a rub on and dry off. At the same time, I made a bunch of tools in the HS and used a 50/50 of turpentine and linseed oil. I would soak the tools in this for a few hours, take them out rub them down with a cloth and let them dry. Worked real well. These days, I make some tools using bamboo kitchen tools, seems like the bamboo does not get damaged by water even when laying in it for days.   :)

 

 

best,

Pres