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metal and mud

Member Since 07 Dec 2011
Offline Last Active Jul 07 2014 06:19 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Visting Albequerque,NM

03 June 2013 - 02:28 PM


I prefered Santa fe and Taos to Albequerque. They are one and a half hours north. You have Santa Fe Clay which has visiting artists and a pottery studio. In the desert west of Taos, you have the Earth Ships built out of rubber tires and recycled materials by Michael Reynolds. An entire community living off the grid. Tons of you tube videos about him.
TJR

Thanks TJ. good suggestions, right up my alley.



Ah, Northern New Mexico. I was raised in Los Alamos and Espanola (both north of Santa Fe) and the dirt and air, I think, infused my blood with the love of pottery. If you want the true New Mexico experience, skip the commercial galleries and vendors and locate some of the pueblos, whose residents sell their wares (most of them fired in pits or ovens in their back yard), and visit them. You can see some lovely works and buy them quite cheap. San Ildefonso is a really good one, so is Santa Clara. In Santa Fe, the Palace of the Governors, which is akin to the "town square," on Saturdays features local potters and other Native Americans who sell their works set on blankets under the portals of old, old adobe buildings.

In Topic: Wondering how to do this brushwork

22 April 2013 - 02:23 PM

I contribute so rarely I forget how to reply. Sorry. Can you'all figure out where this reply is supposed to go?

In Topic: Wondering how to do this brushwork

22 April 2013 - 02:21 PM


I'm surprised no one mentioned china paints.... If the second piece looks like the detail is on top of the glaze, it is probably china paints. They are applied after the glaze is fired and then refired to about cone 016. Check the directions on the china paints if you try it. Here's a website that sells supplies. http://www.marylandc...g-supplies.html
Try searching on YouTube or Google for China Painting techniques...

Good Luck!


I think you just did...Scooby, rank roo

The site that has given me the inspiration, is strictly Japanese potters and that is what Im shooting for, look wise. But now clues given at the latest blog post seem to signal china paints, what he call overglaze enamels are being used. Here is a quote then the link

Three views of a fantastic overglaze enamel celadon pot with goldfish. The thickness of the enamel makes the goldfish seem almost 3 dimensional. The detailing to the feet is especially nice.



I have had some fun, and a little success, playing with oxides. I recently applied a nice cobalt oxide to a piece that had a negative texture (bamboo) on a white clay that had been bisque fired to 04. I VERY carefully dabbed on a clear glaze with a sponge, then brushed over it with another layer of clay. Some areas of the cobalt bled into the clear glaze in little blobs; some areas (where the oxide was thinner) didn't. So it seems to me that on my next trial I should wipe off more of the cobalt so it won't bleed into the clear. But I'm reading here that maybe I can apply the cobalt to the dried piece and bisque fire it and then the cobalt won't bleed into the clear glaze. Would that work? Now that I'm writing this I'm thinking that this would work with cobalt brushed on, but not cobalt wiped off, because that would destroy the texture on the piece that was not hardened by bisque firing. Hmm. . .stream of consciousness learning. . .
http://japanesebonsaipots.net/


In Topic: Which extruder is the best?

19 March 2013 - 04:13 PM



Mark, are you talking about this one?:

http://www.continent...yID=55&PID=1362


Yes thats the one-I recommend for classrooms and multi users


I have the shackle one and have zero issues with it but some folks(especially in class situations have it slip and it can be a shock)
For me we use an extruder 4-5 days a week and the Brent head system is the best-I threw away my Scott Creek head and wielded on the Brent barrel side pins and fitted it with a brent head-now its the best of both worlds. We have worn down two plunger heads over time and replaced them-its almost time for the third-The All Brent extruder has held up a bit better.
We only use porcelain now and the rust is a non issue.
Extruders are like cars everyone has a favorite-we need them to have quick change heads and hold up well in heavy use-Brent has done that-Scott Creek almost so
Northstar-well I will not say anything as it would not be nice-well maybe for super light hobby use every 8th Sunday afternoon.
Mark


I try again. :) I posted my query before I left for work this morning and hoped I'd have a reply. Thank you for all your opinions!! I knew they'd vary based on experience and particular needs of the potter who used the extruder. It looks like North Star is the big loser and Brent the seeming favorite. ( I do plan to use it more than every 8th Sunday afternoon.)

In Topic: Which extruder is the best?

19 March 2013 - 04:09 PM


Mark, are you talking about this one?:

http://www.continent...yID=55&PID=1362


Yes thats the one-I recommend for classrooms and multi users


I have the shackle one and have zero issues with it but some folks(especially in class situations have it slip and it can be a shock)
For me we use an extruder 4-5 days a week and the Brent head system is the best-I threw away my Scott Creek head and wielded on the Brent barrel side pins and fitted it with a brent head-now its the best of both worlds. We have worn down two plunger heads over time and replaced them-its almost time for the third-The All Brent extruder has held up a bit better.
We only use porcelain now and the rust is a non issue.
Extruders are like cars everyone has a favorite-we need them to have quick change heads and hold up well in heavy use-Brent has done that-Scott Creek almost so
Northstar-well I will not say anything as it would not be nice-well maybe for super light hobby use every 8th Sunday afternoon.
Mark