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RonSa

Member Since 21 Oct 2016
Online Last Active Today, 03:43 PM
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#124513 Qotw: Pottery Attributes In The Studio

Posted by RonSa on Today, 08:39 AM

For me form is always primary, if the form is not there than function or surface doesn't really matter.

 

If there is a mug or a teapot with an unpleasing form, would you still want to purchase or use it even if the glaze (surface) is perfect? Of course pleasing or unpleasing is in the eye of the beholder.

 

Now if you have a beautiful form along with a beautiful surface you have a winner.




#124289 Recycling Clay - Turns Black And Stinky

Posted by RonSa on 25 March 2017 - 05:42 PM

White vinegar would also help with the smell.




#124243 Favorite Tools

Posted by RonSa on 24 March 2017 - 07:14 AM

I'd like to get me a gyubera
 
I came across this video

 




#124199 Newbie

Posted by RonSa on 23 March 2017 - 09:01 AM

I'm pretty good at building things, I even brought a couple of items to market. With the exception of the wheel head (and that would have been easy to make) I already had all the parts to build a variable speed electric wheel. My original plan was to create a stick shift to control the speed. I'd like to mention up to this point the only wheel I ever saw and threw on was an old 2 speed Amaco that has a three position toggle switch (low - off - high).

 

Then a friend lent me her wheel with a foot pedal to regulate the speed. Well, after about 10 minutes on that wheel I realized I wasn't going to build one better with the parts I had on hand. I also knew that If I purchased a variable speed DC motor and designed a foot pedal my cost would have exceeded the price of a Speedball Clay Boss.  And that wouldn't have included my time along with the possibility that my wheel may not have been as good.

 

So, I bought a Bailey instead.

 

Sometimes building isn't quicker, better or cheaper, especially when you wind up with a Rube Goldberg type of contraption. So my point of all this is I would suggest that you keep an eye out for a used wheel and remind your husband that a happy wife means a happy life.

 

Good Luck

 

Edit In:

In my first version the variable speed stick shift would have been mechanical. With the DC motor it would have been electronic

 

 




#124159 White Lead

Posted by RonSa on 22 March 2017 - 11:50 AM

I have 41 pounds of it. Its a lot to throw away because it does have some value.

I don't want to keep it because I will never use it.

 

No, you can't just throw it away, that's highly illegal because it would be considered toxic waste. 

 

Follow the link Min supplied about the laws and regulations for safely and legally disposing lead




#123999 Glaze Spray Booth Exhaust Fan

Posted by RonSa on 18 March 2017 - 03:05 PM

 !0" duct fan




#123932 Lesson #541

Posted by RonSa on 17 March 2017 - 02:35 PM

Lesson #541

 

   Take the lid off the jar before you turn it over to sign it.

         Note to self: Its worse if you are standing.




#123804 Tea Pots

Posted by RonSa on 15 March 2017 - 05:15 PM

 vocal inflection is probably also important.

 

and the look... 

 

I haven't heard that phase in over 50 years.




#123457 Qotw: How, When Or Why Did You Start With Working In Clay?

Posted by RonSa on 09 March 2017 - 08:43 AM

 

I've mentioned before that I use a lathe to turn wood. Many times when I'm in a gallery I would see ceramics and would say to my wife "I did that on a lathe" or "I bet I could do that with wood." Shapes for both turning and throwing are so similar.

 

Almost a year ago I retired and I kept myself busy in my garden making some changes that I wanted to do for years and had a wonderful crop that I was able to share with friends and family.

 

It was fall and winter was coming. My wife knows that I like to keep busy and decided to enroll us in a adult pottery class at the local high school. I admit I was reluctant at first thinking this wasn't a direction I wanted to go but I decided it would be nice to take a class together so we went.

 

5 months later I've fallen into the deep vortex of throwing clay. There is no escape.

 

 

I often think this when I see a video of someone wood turning! It's so similar in many ways. It's more limited because of the rigidity of the wood, but of course working with a material that does not dry out overnight and does not shrink or have to be fired must be nice! 

 

 

Wood's rigidity just gives it a different range of possibilities. I can turn a jar (woodturners call them boxes) with a suction cup fitting lid that makes them air tight yet easy to open.

 

Green wood does shrink when drying and will crack if not properly controlled.  Even after its dry and a finish applied it will expand and contract through the seasons depending on the ambient temperature and humidity.

 

Take a look at frame and panel doors, those panels are not glued in and float to prevent cracking.




#123408 Qotw: How, When Or Why Did You Start With Working In Clay?

Posted by RonSa on 08 March 2017 - 08:28 AM

I've mentioned before that I use a lathe to turn wood. Many times when I'm in a gallery I would see ceramics and would say to my wife "I did that on a lathe" or "I bet I could do that with wood." Shapes for both turning and throwing are so similar.

 

Almost a year ago I retired and I kept myself busy in my garden making some changes that I wanted to do for years and had a wonderful crop that I was able to share with friends and family.

 

It was fall and winter was coming. My wife knows that I like to keep busy and decided to enroll us in a adult pottery class at the local high school. I admit I was reluctant at first thinking this wasn't a direction I wanted to go but I decided it would be nice to take a class together so we went.

 

5 months later I've fallen into the deep vortex of throwing clay. There is no escape.




#123407 Marking Up And Using Holes As Decoration

Posted by RonSa on 08 March 2017 - 08:05 AM

You can easily use an inkjet print to transfer an image to a cylinder. Just wrap the paper around the tube with the image facing inward then dampen the paper just enough for the ink to transfer. The ink will burn off when fired.




#123211 Web Site Building And Marketing

Posted by RonSa on 04 March 2017 - 08:03 AM

But consider this [email protected].  Now doesn't that look nice?  With only that email address anyone can also find your website and know your name.

 

Since you have hosting from google you already have that capability at no additional cost. Its even powered by the same people as gmail!

 

Any way, good luck with your business. I wish you the best.




#123208 Wooden Ribs And Rollers

Posted by RonSa on 04 March 2017 - 07:31 AM

Well I do purchase food grade for my boards.

 

There is a misconception about food grade wood finishes helped by marketing experts, The truth is all wood finishes are food safe once they are CURED. Even if the finish is dry to the touch it may not be cured, it may take a bit longer. The way to know if the finish has cured is sniff it, if you can still smell the finish it isn't cured.

 

For cutting boards the best finish is no finish. Any type of oil or wax just makes it look pretty.

 

I do most of the cooking at home because I enjoy it. My cutting board is 25 years old and I have never placed a finish on it in all that time. It is still safe and sanitary. I might add there are studies that show wooden boards are more sanitary than plastic boards, even after the board has been through the dishwasher.

 

Olive is ok on cutting boards but like mineral oil it needs to be reapplied quite often. Be careful though, oil olive can go rancid on a board. Personally I think its better than mineral oil since mineral oil is used as a laxative.

 

Ron AKA WoodNerd :D




#123188 Wooden Ribs And Rollers

Posted by RonSa on 03 March 2017 - 07:33 PM

Mineral oil doesn't last very long when exposed to moisture. A better product would be Boiled Linseed Oil (not to be confused with raw linseed oil) which can be purchased at any big box store such as Lowes and Home Depot.

 

FWIW, mineral oil on a wooden cutting board makes the wood look nice, it doesn't protect the wood unless you reapply the oil after each and every use. Before you ask it does not rejuvenate the wood by penetration. At best the oil is only skin deep maybe 0.01" to 0.02" deep.

 

(When you think mineral oil think refined motor oil, do you really want that on your food?) 




#123181 Moving Studio To Montana

Posted by RonSa on 03 March 2017 - 04:52 PM

Looks like a magical place.

 

This might be a little late for this. The last shop I built I had power lines with outlets dropped from the ceiling for equipment. It was a great way to keep power cords off the floor