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Min

Member Since 31 Mar 2010
Offline Last Active Jun 27 2015 11:15 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Cornish Stone Substitution

24 June 2015 - 08:35 AM

Dolomite.................... 0.37
Custer Feldspar............. 30.43
Wollastonite................ 3.30
Kaolin...................... 12.85
Silica...................... 29.29
Nepheline Syenite........... 23.75
=========
100.00

 

recipe from here: http://digitalfire.c..._stone_194.html


In Topic: Pug Mills :)

21 June 2015 - 10:39 AM

 

It's more than just the time savings of recycling clay if that is the reason for buying one.

 

-they save a lot of wear and tear on the body than manually recycling the clay

-you tend to not think twice about wasting time trying to rescue a piece, into the pugger it goes if it's a little wonky

-blending clay bodies or adding grog / sand

-getting the clay to the consistency that you need it for specific forms

 

I kind off think of it as being similar to a car hoist, yes a mechanic can use car jacks but it is so much easier to use a hydraulic lift. It's a tool and I love tools that save time and effort. Yes, you can just toss the clay scraps but if you have years and years of clay work in front of you I can't see not having a pugger.

 

Is the one you are looking at stainless and with a vacuum? Is was hard to tell from the Bailey page.

(I've got the MSV25 Stainless with vacuum and love it. I have used it with a handle die that I just clamped onto the end, it makes a really good extruder too)

 

Yes I can see the advantages of a pug mill now.  The 400 has a vacuum and they do have a stainless option.  I looked at the MSV25 just now.  I'll have to weigh my options but it seems I need stainless and a vacuum for sure.

 

Did you just attach that handle die or is it a special attachment for the pug?

 

 

The handle die I bought is actually for the larger sized Peter Pugger as Bailey doesn't have one to fit their puggers (might now but not when I bought mine). 

 

There are 4 bolt holes on the outer flange of the nozzle of the pugger, centers are 4 3/4" apart and the largest handle die I could find is only 4 1/2" outside diameter so I couldn't bolt it on. When I need a lot of handles I use small C clamps and there is just enough room to clamp it on. I don't block off any of the handles as there is so much force coming through the die. I only use 1 of the handles (the one at 12:00 o'clock) as the others are way to skinny and flimsy for what I want. The die also fits into my extruder, I use that when I only need a few handles.

 

As to stainless or not this is not something you can change later on, like adding a vacuum. I look at this similarly as to buying a kiln, buying for what you will need in the future not just for now.

 

I just reread the last bit of what I wrote and it sounded kinda preachy, sorry if it comes across like that, didn't mean too!  :)


In Topic: Pug Mills :)

20 June 2015 - 10:28 PM

It's more than just the time savings of recycling clay if that is the reason for buying one.

 

-they save a lot of wear and tear on the body than manually recycling the clay

-you tend to not think twice about wasting time trying to rescue a piece, into the pugger it goes if it's a little wonky

-blending clay bodies or adding grog / sand

-getting the clay to the consistency that you need it for specific forms

 

I kind off think of it as being similar to a car hoist, yes a mechanic can use car jacks but it is so much easier to use a hydraulic lift. It's a tool and I love tools that save time and effort. Yes, you can just toss the clay scraps but if you have years and years of clay work in front of you I can't see not having a pugger.

 

Is the one you are looking at stainless and with a vacuum? Is was hard to tell from the Bailey page.

(I've got the MSV25 Stainless with vacuum and love it. I have used it with a handle die that I just clamped onto the end, it makes a really good extruder too)


In Topic: Glaze And Slip Casting

20 June 2015 - 10:15 PM

Yeah, I have seen the coloured slip brushed or poured in then lined with plain slip but hadn't seen it done with glaze. It seems like it would be difficult to lay down an even thickness of glaze. I'm not sure what the advantage of doing it this way versus using coloured slip then a clear glaze over would be. I also wondered how the cobalt slip or glaze would stain the moulds. 


In Topic: Electric Kiln Firing Help

18 June 2015 - 06:50 PM

Lee, are you using a green or blue tinted lens? I find the green #5 welders lens really works well, I have a darker one too and it's nearly impossible to see the cones at ^6 with that one.


I sometimes paint a very thin stripe of black ceramic ink or underglaze down the length of the cone, it really pops out and is easy to see. Can you put your cone packs in so there is an element behind it? Easier said than done but if you can that helps too.