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Jo-Ann

Member Since 12 Oct 2011
Online Last Active Today, 07:45 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Knitting Bowls

27 January 2016 - 11:47 AM

sorry its take so long, I'm retiring from my government job this week so things have been crazy! 

Anyway, as promised here is an example of how small the warping is when my bowls do warp. Its rarely worse than this.


In Topic: Knitting Bowls

24 January 2016 - 08:48 AM

 

Yarn bowls are my absolute favourite to make, I enjoy making each one different depending on my mood.

I use stonewear clay, throw a little thicker and cut just before leather hard. I wrap the top in plastic and dry upside down. Sometimes I will use paper wedges to support the swirl part if I notice some sagging (the wedges just burn up in the kiln) 

after I bisque I sand the swirl as I once used a yarn bowl that didn't have a perfectly smooth swirl and it snagged my yarn and really annoyed me while I was knitting lol so now i'm mindful of how smooth the swirl and inner bowl is. I use a small sharp blade and hand carve all of my cuts, which is why I cut just before leather hard, I find that while there is risk of sagging for me its easier to carve when the clay isn't so stiff. Yarn bowls are my biggest seller. I personally don't like, wont use and wont sell a warped bowl but that's just me being picky. Slow drying, a gentle hand when carving and paper wedges for support helps me avoid warping. 

 

Here are a bunch of bowls i've made.

WOW ... those bowls are simply stunning Jo-Ann.

 

I see you also take a generous amount away (cut/carve out) as I do. Do you have many that slump/warp after firing? 

 

What's the top temperature you fire these babies to in your glaze firing? 

 

They truly are quite beautiful. 

 

 

thank you so much for your kind words on my work  :)  

 

my fire schedule is probably overly slow but it seems to be working for me, i have about 2 warped bowls of every 20 the warps aren't as dramatic as when i used to fire quicker. I opened my kill this morning and can show you what a warp looks like after i get a photo. My fire schedules are as fallows 

 

Bisque to cone 06 (900 to 1000 degrees celsius I have a manual kiln and no temp gauge so its not exact, I trust in the cone lol)

- 3 hours all switches on low, all peeps open, lid propped open

- 1 hour all switches on medium, all peeps open, lid propped open

- 2 hours all switches on medium, all peeps in except the top two, lid closed 

- until sitter shuts off (usually about 2-3 hours) all switches on high, all peeps in, lid closed 

 

I allow 20 hours too cool before opening, keeping my down draft vent running and removing all peeps around the half way point

 

Glaze fire to cone 6 (1200 to 1300 degrees celsius)

- 2 hours all switches on low setting, all peeps open, lid propped open

- 3 hours all switches on low, all peeps in except the top two, lid closed

- 3 hours all switches on medium, all peeps in except the top two, lid closed

- 2 hour all switches on medium, all peeps in, lid closed

- until sitter shuts off (usually about 2 hours) all switches on high, all peeps in, lid closed 

 

I allow 24 hours too cool before opening, keeping my down draft vent running and removing all peeps around the half way point


In Topic: Creating Product Lines / Over Time

20 January 2016 - 12:48 PM

WOW! What a great post with a lot of helpful information! Thank you!


In Topic: What Weight Of Clay For Wool Bowls

20 January 2016 - 11:54 AM

reading a lot about warping in another post, if the slit from rim is more vertical would this lead to less warping? Assuming that the shape of cut out is a simple 6

 

yes, it has been my experience that the smaller the slit or less curly or wavy the less chance for warping. you want to leave enough space between the hole and the rim tho cause if the loop is too close to the top you create a weak spot and even after a glaze firing can snap off with a good bump.


In Topic: Knitting Bowls

19 January 2016 - 01:01 PM

Yarn bowls are my absolute favourite to make, I enjoy making each one different depending on my mood.

I use stonewear clay, throw a little thicker and cut just before leather hard. I wrap the top in plastic and dry upside down. Sometimes I will use paper wedges to support the swirl part if I notice some sagging (the wedges just burn up in the kiln) 

after I bisque I sand the swirl as I once used a yarn bowl that didn't have a perfectly smooth swirl and it snagged my yarn and really annoyed me while I was knitting lol so now i'm mindful of how smooth the swirl and inner bowl is. I use a small sharp blade and hand carve all of my cuts, which is why I cut just before leather hard, I find that while there is risk of sagging for me its easier to carve when the clay isn't so stiff. Yarn bowls are my biggest seller. I personally don't like, wont use and wont sell a warped bowl but that's just me being picky. Slow drying, a gentle hand when carving and paper wedges for support helps me avoid warping. 

 

Here are a bunch of bowls i've made.