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neilestrick

Member Since 04 Oct 2011
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 04:48 PM
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#81018 How Common Are Exclusivity Clauses? (Long)

Posted by neilestrick on 07 May 2015 - 01:07 PM

I'm betting that someone among the artists has a lawyer spouse or relative that would be happy to help out for little or no cost.




#81015 Solar Powered Kiln?

Posted by neilestrick on 07 May 2015 - 12:42 PM

Tyler, I agree that you can't run a kiln from solar power. They don't work in a closed system. John, I also agree with you. Solar can create enough power to run a kiln, but it must be tied into the grid in order to use it.




#80876 Electric Kiln Top Rim Coating?

Posted by neilestrick on 05 May 2015 - 09:20 PM

You can just use watered down brick mortar. As long as it's on thin, it won't flake off.

 

I put a towel on the top edge when I'm working in a kiln. It protects the bricks, but more importantly it protects my shirt from abrasion on the bricks. I've lot a lot of shirts to holes in the belly, especially when replacing elements all day.




#80828 Buying A New Wheel! ^_^ Yes!

Posted by neilestrick on 05 May 2015 - 12:35 PM

I've got 11 Thomas Stuart wheels. Great torque, and the large splash pan will keep your studio cleaner. Get the built-in pan model. Super heavy and sturdy.




#80692 Back Aches And Wheels

Posted by neilestrick on 04 May 2015 - 07:52 AM

 

Do a lot of crunches and keep your core strong. Also put your wheel up on blocks and throw standing or sitting high. I switched to standing a couple of months ago because my back was hurting. The pain is gone, and it's much easier to work in my space without having to get up and down from a chair.

attachicon.gifWheel-Stand.jpg

Neile, did you build that awesomeness. Send me the plans. I'll pay you for it.

 

 

I did build it. Sorry, no plans. Just 3 legs and as much bracing as I could cram in between them. 4x4 legs, 2x4 rails.




#80573 Turned Foot Rings On Mugs; Elegance Or Affectation?

Posted by neilestrick on 02 May 2015 - 11:45 AM

 

It's a balance between spending enough time making your pots that they are beautiful enough that someone wants to buy them, but not so much time that you wasting time doing things that the market won't pay for. I have some designs that make for really great pots, but I can't get enough money for them at art fairs to make it worth my time to produce them. I get $26 for mugs, and at that price I can trim a foot on them.

Yes and we love your mug here- It never stays in the cabinet! I think my teenage daughters adopted it ... 

 

 

Nothing better than to hear one of my pieces is being used a lot. Thanks!




#80526 Turned Foot Rings On Mugs; Elegance Or Affectation?

Posted by neilestrick on 01 May 2015 - 01:46 PM

It's a balance between spending enough time making your pots that they are beautiful enough that someone wants to buy them, but not so much time that you waste time doing things that the market won't pay for. I have some designs that make for really great pots, but I can't get enough money for them at art fairs to make it worth my time to produce them. I get $26 for mugs, and at that price I can trim a foot on them.




#80499 Woot! Trying It Out Finally!

Posted by neilestrick on 01 May 2015 - 08:57 AM

Here's another version of the Cranberry, we call it Raspberry:

Frit 3134      18.98

Neph Sye     18.59

Whiting         19.11

EPK              11.49

Flint               31.83

 

Chrome Ox   0.2

Tin Oxide      7.5

 

It likes to be on thick to get good color, and a solid cone 6 or even a little hotter.




#80469 Turned Foot Rings On Mugs; Elegance Or Affectation?

Posted by neilestrick on 30 April 2015 - 08:41 PM

Trimming a foot also gives you more design options. There are many forms that require trimming.

 

Attached File  Mug.jpg   196.73KB   0 downloads




#80460 Turned Foot Rings On Mugs; Elegance Or Affectation?

Posted by neilestrick on 30 April 2015 - 06:54 PM

Okay so I'm a beginner. But I can already tell you, if there's a support group I might as well join now. I started learning to throw in October and sometimes I just don't leave enough clay on the bottom for a foot. But already 80% of the mugs and bowls I make have a foot. I totally get where this would not work in production, though. Right now the time is less important to me than the learning experience. 

 

I like that the footed mugs have a little color and I personally like to add a contrasting color of glaze to the bottom. Please note: I am not a production potter, my best session yet was 12 mugs and my fingers were sore the next day! When I can't sell them for more than $15 I may change my tune about footed mugs! ;)

 

I'm in the process of glazing my very first kiln load of wheel-thrown mugs and bowls so I don't have anything finished. But I've attached a photo of two Moroccan Sand footed cups right after I attached the handles. 

 

Nice forms, and excellent progress in a very short time. If I may offer some advice- leaving that ring in the center just adds unnecessary weight and a reason for 'S' cracks. Trim it out and the mug will have better balance. Also round of the inner and outer edge of the foot ring so it doesn't scratch the table.




#80412 Moore White - Matte

Posted by neilestrick on 30 April 2015 - 08:10 AM

There are two ways to make a matte glaze- under fire it or grow crystals. It's hard to tell from a photo, but yours looks to be of the under fired family, which is why it doesn't break. Breaking glazes flow off the ridges and settle in the low spots. Formula-wise I would look for glazes with magnesium in them, and play with slow cooling schedules to achieve matteness.




#80380 Perfect Fire Digital Controller: Using/fixing?

Posted by neilestrick on 29 April 2015 - 02:30 PM

1. If they are all coming on and staying on and not following the program, then it's the controller and should be replaced.

 

2. If it's only one relay staying on, it's a sticky relay. That's assuming that all the relays are controlled by the same output on the controller.

 

3. If each relay is on its own output, then it could still be a controller issue. In that case you'll have to get a meter on it while the relay is stuck on, and see if the controller is signaling it to be on or not.




#80326 Cone Ten

Posted by neilestrick on 28 April 2015 - 08:29 PM

Yes, I saw a translucent body that was achieved at bisque temps ... Amazing stuff though not commercially available yet.

 

I think we're in an exciting time in ceramics. Now that mid-range oxidation firing has gained some respect, I have to think that we'll start to see more vitrified wares being done at even lower temps. I began work on a cone 2 'porcelain' a couple of months ago. It's not so difficult to formulate one that's vitrified, but the color and cost are a challenge. My whole reason for doing it is to reduce my firings costs, and increase the longevity of my elements. I estimate they will last at least 50% longer, if not twice as long, as firing to cone 6.




#80319 City Studio: Firing Work?

Posted by neilestrick on 28 April 2015 - 08:09 PM

Whatever you do, get the ok from the local authorities and your insurance company. You don't want to get shut down after spending all that time and money.




#80194 Reccomendations For Sc White Stoneware/porcelain

Posted by neilestrick on 27 April 2015 - 01:36 PM

We use a lot of 240 in my studio, but it is very fine grained, so not all that forgiving. We also use a lot of 630, which is very forgiving and a pleasure to work with whether throwing or hand building. It's a little more grey-white, where as the 240 is yellow-white. The 630 is basically a cone 6 version of 182. It has fire clay in it, so it has a little more tooth, although it feels quite smooth when working with it. I use 365 grolleg porcelain for most of my work, which is one of the best throwing porcelains I've ever used. It's not quite as glassy as some other porcelains, but I almost never have warpage or cracking problems. I've made 50 pound planters with it with no problems. 181 is a cone 10 body, very smooth, prone to cracking and not good for larger pots. We also use 112 in my studio, which is their speckled brown. It's an excellent stoneware body, one of my favorites of all time. They also make a non-speckled version, 225.