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neilestrick

Member Since 04 Oct 2011
Offline Last Active May 22 2015 05:26 PM
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#82216 Group Studio: How To Figure Out Cost Sharing

Posted by neilestrick on 22 May 2015 - 08:45 AM

A studio here in the Chicago area has a soda kiln, and the cost for putting pieces in it is very high because they have to rebuild it every 4 years or so. They fire it at least 100 times a year, and use a lot of soda, so it doesn't last too long. The rebuild cost can range from $8,000 to $15,000, depending on how much brick can be salvaged and the degree to which it is torn down. So if you do it right, when it comes time to rebuild your kiln, you'll have enough money put aside to do it.




#82172 Need A Cheap Simple Clay Body Recipe

Posted by neilestrick on 21 May 2015 - 12:41 PM

Thanks for the update. For 32 cents a pound you can select from dozens and dozens of commercially available pre-mixed bodies and save yourself a lot of time and effort, and get something you want instead of something that's just in the right price range.




#81910 Using Bisques Clay As Armature

Posted by neilestrick on 19 May 2015 - 09:16 AM

Any time you put something hard inside the clay there's a good chance of the clay cracking as it dries. The clay shrinks, the armature doesn't. You may be able to get away with something small like toothpicks if the sculpture itself is not really small and thin. It is possible to build without an armature by building it in sections and joining them when they are leather hard, or by building it solid and then cutting it open and hollowing it out.




#81397 Renting Studio (Long)

Posted by neilestrick on 12 May 2015 - 10:19 AM

The vent will connect to the outside via a semi-rigid flexible duct, probably a 4". You'll just need a standard 4" dryer duct through the wall or roof. The vent will pull a small bit of air form the kiln, and a much larger volume from the room to cool the kiln air. The air going out through the wall will be under 150F, no hotter than a clothes dryer. Use the vent and stay home.




#81260 Old Orton Controller

Posted by neilestrick on 11 May 2015 - 09:49 AM

As long as that controller has the functionality you need, then just use it till there's a problem. If it does not have the functions you need, then I recommend the Bartlett V6-CF. The Bartlett might not fit into the same hole, though, so you'll have to cut the box or add a piece of sheet metal to make it fit.


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#81018 How Common Are Exclusivity Clauses? (Long)

Posted by neilestrick on 07 May 2015 - 01:07 PM

I'm betting that someone among the artists has a lawyer spouse or relative that would be happy to help out for little or no cost.




#81015 Solar Powered Kiln?

Posted by neilestrick on 07 May 2015 - 12:42 PM

Tyler, I agree that you can't run a kiln from solar power. They don't work in a closed system. John, I also agree with you. Solar can create enough power to run a kiln, but it must be tied into the grid in order to use it.




#80876 Electric Kiln Top Rim Coating?

Posted by neilestrick on 05 May 2015 - 09:20 PM

You can just use watered down brick mortar. As long as it's on thin, it won't flake off.

 

I put a towel on the top edge when I'm working in a kiln. It protects the bricks, but more importantly it protects my shirt from abrasion on the bricks. I've lot a lot of shirts to holes in the belly, especially when replacing elements all day.




#80828 Buying A New Wheel! ^_^ Yes!

Posted by neilestrick on 05 May 2015 - 12:35 PM

I've got 11 Thomas Stuart wheels. Great torque, and the large splash pan will keep your studio cleaner. Get the built-in pan model. Super heavy and sturdy.




#80692 Back Aches And Wheels

Posted by neilestrick on 04 May 2015 - 07:52 AM

 

Do a lot of crunches and keep your core strong. Also put your wheel up on blocks and throw standing or sitting high. I switched to standing a couple of months ago because my back was hurting. The pain is gone, and it's much easier to work in my space without having to get up and down from a chair.

attachicon.gifWheel-Stand.jpg

Neile, did you build that awesomeness. Send me the plans. I'll pay you for it.

 

 

I did build it. Sorry, no plans. Just 3 legs and as much bracing as I could cram in between them. 4x4 legs, 2x4 rails.




#80573 Turned Foot Rings On Mugs; Elegance Or Affectation?

Posted by neilestrick on 02 May 2015 - 11:45 AM

 

It's a balance between spending enough time making your pots that they are beautiful enough that someone wants to buy them, but not so much time that you wasting time doing things that the market won't pay for. I have some designs that make for really great pots, but I can't get enough money for them at art fairs to make it worth my time to produce them. I get $26 for mugs, and at that price I can trim a foot on them.

Yes and we love your mug here- It never stays in the cabinet! I think my teenage daughters adopted it ... 

 

 

Nothing better than to hear one of my pieces is being used a lot. Thanks!




#80526 Turned Foot Rings On Mugs; Elegance Or Affectation?

Posted by neilestrick on 01 May 2015 - 01:46 PM

It's a balance between spending enough time making your pots that they are beautiful enough that someone wants to buy them, but not so much time that you waste time doing things that the market won't pay for. I have some designs that make for really great pots, but I can't get enough money for them at art fairs to make it worth my time to produce them. I get $26 for mugs, and at that price I can trim a foot on them.




#80499 Woot! Trying It Out Finally!

Posted by neilestrick on 01 May 2015 - 08:57 AM

Here's another version of the Cranberry, we call it Raspberry:

Frit 3134      18.98

Neph Sye     18.59

Whiting         19.11

EPK              11.49

Flint               31.83

 

Chrome Ox   0.2

Tin Oxide      7.5

 

It likes to be on thick to get good color, and a solid cone 6 or even a little hotter.




#80469 Turned Foot Rings On Mugs; Elegance Or Affectation?

Posted by neilestrick on 30 April 2015 - 08:41 PM

Trimming a foot also gives you more design options. There are many forms that require trimming.

 

Attached File  Mug.jpg   196.73KB   0 downloads




#80460 Turned Foot Rings On Mugs; Elegance Or Affectation?

Posted by neilestrick on 30 April 2015 - 06:54 PM

Okay so I'm a beginner. But I can already tell you, if there's a support group I might as well join now. I started learning to throw in October and sometimes I just don't leave enough clay on the bottom for a foot. But already 80% of the mugs and bowls I make have a foot. I totally get where this would not work in production, though. Right now the time is less important to me than the learning experience. 

 

I like that the footed mugs have a little color and I personally like to add a contrasting color of glaze to the bottom. Please note: I am not a production potter, my best session yet was 12 mugs and my fingers were sore the next day! When I can't sell them for more than $15 I may change my tune about footed mugs! ;)

 

I'm in the process of glazing my very first kiln load of wheel-thrown mugs and bowls so I don't have anything finished. But I've attached a photo of two Moroccan Sand footed cups right after I attached the handles. 

 

Nice forms, and excellent progress in a very short time. If I may offer some advice- leaving that ring in the center just adds unnecessary weight and a reason for 'S' cracks. Trim it out and the mug will have better balance. Also round of the inner and outer edge of the foot ring so it doesn't scratch the table.