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Evelyne Schoenmann

Member Since 03 Aug 2011
Offline Last Active Sep 03 2015 01:06 PM
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Topics I've Started

Qotw: What Do You Think Of Art Critique?

01 September 2015 - 11:23 AM

Recently I had an intensive discussion with the ceramist Marc Leuthold about: is art critic necessary or not. He said:

 

“Critics play a key role in educating the public and calling attention to overlooked artwork. If they do their job well and pick wisely, they play a valuable role in the art world”.

 

And what is YOUR opinion? Debate is open.............

 

Evelyne

 

Edit: An American friend just explained to me the difference between critique and critic. You know, there are many stumbling blocks in the way when one's mother tongue isn't English. I, and Marc, of course meant "art critics", but we gladly can discuss both, critique AND critics, here in this weeks QOTW.


Qotw: Do You Strictly Observe The Safety Rules In Studio?

25 August 2015 - 11:03 AM

Cough, cough.... Hi everybody!

 

I just came up from my basement studio to write this week's question. I did a few plaster molds today, and while preparing all the preventive measures, I came up with a new question: Are you all observing the safety rules 1) Exaggerated? 2) Extrem? 3) Ehm... certainly? 4) Yes (blush)? 5) Well... to a certain degree? 6) Now and then? 7) I guess....? 8) Are there safety rules in a studio?? :o ............

 

Well, I think you get the picture. Oh, speaking of picture: I did a selfie "Evelyne observing safety rules; plaster mix in the background on the table"

 

Evelyne


Qotw: Is Your Artistic Practice A Product Of Genetics Or The Environment?

18 August 2015 - 08:04 AM

Good morning America, good afternoon Europe, Africa and South Africa, good evening Australia and Asia

 

This week I am happy to present the question of another guest, our forum member Tom, aka TJR. He has the following question and challenge for us:

 

Is your artistic practice a product of genetics or the environment? Are you an artist despite your family or because of them?
In my family, I grew up in a beige house. Beige, carpet, drapes and couch. My mom added numbers together to relax. My dad was like McGiver, creative, resourceful,ingenious.
I am an artist, my sister is an interior designer, my other sister is a photographer.

What's YOUR story?

 

 

Thank you Tom for the idea of a great QOTW topic!

 

Evelyne


Qotw: Which Song Plays There In The Background?

11 August 2015 - 10:02 AM

Sorry people but it's way too hot for a serious question. It's in the 107 F here and humidity towards 90 percent.... :wacko: (And I like to remind you: no AC allowed here. Please have some pity....). 

 

So this weeks question is easy: are you listening to music, radio news, audio books or maybe to your neighbours quarreling while working in your studio?

 

I myself am listening (involuntarily) to the latter way to often IMO.... :rolleyes: If they aren't quarreling, I love the silence in my studio! So no music or whatsoever for me. Silence and concentration. How about you? 

 

Evelyne


Qotw: What Makes Something Qualify As Hand Made?

28 July 2015 - 09:10 AM

Today I have a guest! Our forum member Terry, aka Pugaboo, (yes, exactly, that's the one with the Pug named Pandora!) sent me a p.m. with a QOTW-suggestion. I think it's a good topic and so Terry is my guest today. Here is what she wrote about the theme:

 

 

Reading through some of the etsy topic got me to thinking what is really truly handmade when it comes to pottery. Are we allowed to use any tools at all? Is a Slabroller considered a mechanical advantage? What about a wheel? Take it even further to using an extruder: does using these tools make your work no longer qualify for hand made?

Thinking on this it came to me that pinch pots and coils are probably the only pottery methods that would be handmade if you took it to the extreme.

From my point of view I think technology is wonderful to incorporate into your art forms as long as you incorporate it and not use the technology to solely create the work. A 3-D printer is OUT but a slab roller is in.

Not sure if it would get any interest but having been a photographer, graphic artist, painter, muralist, and now potter it has me thinking where is the line drawn and who does the drawing?

 

 

Come on people, let's show Pugaboo that this question really is of interest to us potters! What do you think: what makes something qualify as (truly) hand made?

 

Evelyne and Pugaboo