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LeeU

Member Since 04 May 2014
Offline Last Active May 18 2017 12:20 PM
*****

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Help! Newbie Struggling With How Much Water?

17 May 2017 - 01:14 PM

For wedging, I use the cut, stack & slam method-I have all kinds of problems with hands/forearms/spine etc. and this is much easier than other technques. Took a while to get the hang of it, but well worth it.  A friend made me the cut & slam set up. He chose steel for the base before I could suggest a board w/canvas but it is working out just fine. Spiral wedging is my second choice, especially for small quantities for wheel work. I also chose stoneware clay without grit and avoided earthenware because I hate that red mess!  Less and less water needed over time-comes with practice. Just curious--betta, as in Siamese fighting fish?


In Topic: Web Site Building And Marketing

17 May 2017 - 12:47 PM

OK..........just FYI, I may not be around in 10 years (70 in July-though as an aging hippie and inherently resistant to aging, I intend to live to 100-we'll see how it goes). I am not overly concerned, as a hobby business, about profit over time. I want to pay for my supplies-basically any real profit is gravy. The original query had to do with the valuing (reflected in pricing) of the creative aspect to my pieces, versus the basic formula of covering overhead/materials/time. 

 

And please bear with, re: the purpose of this Busness forum, as I am not a professional and don't intend to be. I do make every effort to learn good business practices and apply them. I am approachng my "hobby biz" as a seasoned and trained amateur, in the correct and best sense of that term. 

 

I did an interesting experiment recently--I selected a quantity of various types of pieces and ranked them into "A" ($30-35), "B" ($20-25) and "C" ($10-15) pricing tiers, based on my perception of value-added (the creative twists) and basic comparison research for similar products, tho that was pretty limited. Then I got a few people who I could trust to be objective (if not brutally honest!) to take the same batch of pieces-without knowing how I priced them-and asked them to rank them A-B-C for higher to lowest pricing within a $10-$35 range. What warmed my little heart is that the emergent concensus was that I was under-valuing the Cs, and some of the Bs. Something I discovered was that they cared less about size (i.e. I priced smaller items lower) than the surface attributes. For example, an especially attractive small spoon rest (I had put it at C) was priced higher by the majority of the group than a much larger, less intricate, one (I had at B-they pegged it a C). Cool.  B) This will clearly be a live & learn adventure! 


In Topic: Pottery Knowledge Quiz Of The Week (Pkqw): Week 8

16 May 2017 - 02:22 PM

There is a nice excerpt from this book online-it can be downloaded as a pfd:

 

http://cad-website-i...t_Revised_2.pdf

 

I ahd to look up all fo the answers so I'm not doing the quiz (brain not cooperating, at lesat at the moment.).


In Topic: Qotw: What Do You Listen To While Working In The Studio? Music, Tv, Talk Radi...

16 May 2017 - 02:05 PM

I tend to cycle through a sequence of silence-music-silence-music. Today's playlist is: Grace Jones "Nightclubbing", Krishna Das "All One"; Alan Lomax "Texas Folk Songs", and R.E.M. "Up". The silence is enhanced by birdsong.


In Topic: Web Site Building And Marketing

16 May 2017 - 01:58 PM

Thanks... I definately will start with more modest prices and raise over time, if the market permits, rather than start high and then have to lower--that certainly makes sense, especially regarding customer satisfaction, customer relations, and hopefully nurturing repeat customers.  

 

Even for a small hobby business with low risk if it doesn't gel, the business of business-building is quite complex and daunting. But challenging in a good way, looking at the various aspects from various angles and making decisions. The tips, the cautions, the encouragement, and the freely given input--especially from CAD forums--is invaluable and much appreciated. The feeling of community is as important to me as any future sale!