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Bob Coyle

Member Since 06 Jun 2013
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 07:51 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Cooking Pots?

23 October 2014 - 10:23 AM

Mark

 

I get your point. Rather safe than sorry. I make and sell only ceramics for decorative use. I have made functional pots and dishes for my own use and for friends, which I give away. The local shows I have been in, don't require insurance. I can see where production at your level would require liability insurance, as any business.

 

Maybe you also need to put a "choke hazard" warning on the bottom of your spoon rests... :)


In Topic: Cooking Pots?

22 October 2014 - 06:38 PM

Never thought about liability... must be the culture here in New Mexico. I know  twenty or more potters doing micaceous pots used in cooking, and liability never came up. If you are going to sell these things in New Jersey or L.A. , I guess that could be an issue. If so... ain't worth the trouble.


In Topic: Cooking Pots?

22 October 2014 - 02:15 PM

I don't understand the flap over micaceous clay. You can buy commercial stuff from Laguna, or you can dig your own, as they do here in New Mexico. Either way you can make a cook pot that will withstand cooking in an over or even over an open fire. I have done it many times.

 

The problem is, that it is low fire. If you try to high fire micaceous clay, it sinters, and the mica is absorbed into the clay. Being low fire it is absorbent, and liquid cooking products will be leached into the clay.  This discolor's and stains it, and if you try to wash it in soap or detergent, that gets absorbed also. It makes a lovely conversation piece with a big, hand made, micaceous clay pot on the table, but then you have to deal with a cleanup that is difficult. I just use very hot water and then put the pot back in the oven at 350F. that will take care of any germs that might be stuck in the clay.

 

That still leaves grease stains, so every once and a while I put it back into a bisque run in my kiln. That gets rid of the grease. I guess you could put it in the oven on a self cleaning cycle and get the same result.

 

Around here there still is, lots of mutton stew cooked in clay pots that are just washed out with water after use.  Far as I know nobody is dieing of food poisoning because of it.

 

So if you intend to make low fire mica pots rather than high fire oven ware, you know the down side. In most cases I would go with timbo... metal pots are a lot easier to pick up if you drop them.


In Topic: Are We Being Hacked Again?

21 October 2014 - 07:18 PM

You are correct John. You get  them before they get seen by most... Good Job!


In Topic: Art Deco

16 October 2014 - 10:02 AM

Yes Chilly, I think the word you are looking for is "Re-muddled". Sadly a lot of great old architecture was forever lost to a false idea of progress.