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Wyndham

Member Since 07 Apr 2013
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 11:01 AM
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#62299 Help! Not All Elements Are Working In My Kiln.

Posted by Wyndham on 12 July 2014 - 04:36 PM

.The current in kilns can be very dangerous so get an electrician to trace the problem.You need to get someone familiar with kilns to determine where the problem is. The mfg of the kiln will have  a manual that can help trace the issue, maybe give them a call first of the week and explain what's going on.

Do you see any breaks in the elements? If not it may be a loose or shorted wire, get help finding the problem.

Wyndham




#62293 Getting The Perfect Gloss From Terra Sig.

Posted by Wyndham on 12 July 2014 - 03:17 PM

Just wondering if that many refinements with such small particle size could also concentrate either natural salts or alkali in the slip water, forming elementary glaze? 

Very interesting line of development, like a good mystery novel.

Wyndham




#61856 Factors In Determining A Successful Pottery Business

Posted by Wyndham on 06 July 2014 - 02:18 PM

I was not trying to be unkind. The fact that in a 6 month period, I have had 20+ people  inquiring about work only to fulfill paperwork requirements for different type of assistance, quite depressing.

I live in a section of NC that has high unemployment, high, high-school dropout rates and a diminishing pottery tourist market.

It really doesn't matter the deeper causes of these issues, because we have to deal with our daily reality in a very slow economy.

What this means for us is to try and keep the retail doors open for those that still come by and scramble for other markets.

Show cost have gotten very high and considering the downtime from production, wholesale is more profitable than shows.

Cost of clay, glaze, and firing have gone up, but there is a ceiling to the price we can charge for a coffee mug(universal example).

If you are not aware of the economy around you, you may make a major financial mistake in your biz plan.

Wyndham




#61852 Opinions On Good (Free?) Glaze Analysis Software For Mac?

Posted by Wyndham on 06 July 2014 - 01:48 PM

You might use an online glaze calc program here's one I like

 

http://glazecalculator.com/

 

Give it a try

Wyndham




#61826 How Durable Are Cone 06 Mugs?

Posted by Wyndham on 05 July 2014 - 03:40 PM

If it's a cone 6 body fired at 06 ,even glazed, it's water absorption likely would be high and strength low. so microwave usage would be out of the question for me.

If it's an 06 body at cone 6, hope you have some kiln wash on that shelve, I've done it and got the shelf to prove it. :)

 If on he other hand, you have a cone 6 body for a base of a sculpture and added a 06 clay body and glaze for the top, fired at cone 6, I think that might win in an abstract art competition.

Good luck,

Wyndham




#61806 Factors In Determining A Successful Pottery Business

Posted by Wyndham on 05 July 2014 - 09:58 AM

I think many who come out of our education system have never been schooled in "real world work ethics & economics" . Many students can't balance a check book but want a 100k/yr profession.

Ceramics is a little different than most professions, in that there are fewer limits on structure and more on creativity  and personal expression being taught.

There are  fewer hard facts and information about  ceramics being taught about what makes a technically acceptable ceramic object compared to a welding course at a tech school.

A welder taught at a tech school can get a $50-$80k/yr job as a industrial  welder and a pottery grad has yet to learn how to set up a booth at a craft fair, get a sales tax number and plan inventory.

One field has stronger guidelines and structure than the other. No one needs a coffee mug but a welders skills may have life and death consequences.

If there is no educational structure, create it for yourself and demand from yourself the quality education that other fields demand.

Math,finance,geology,history,marketing and more, are the foundations of a pottery career.

It takes years of hard work and learning and still no guarantees of monetary success, but the self discipline will be it's own reward.

Don't expect to go to the front of the line, without time and hard work, even with all that, you maybe far from the front of the line.

 

Why are so many beginning potters asking elementary questions on this forum, if there are well rounded courses teaching in-depth ceramics.

 

Something is missing, such as planning a long road trip and not filling the gas tank.

I recently had a young lady, just graduated from HS come in to ask for a job. She had no idea what was needed for a retail job. She had no training in handling money or what going on in a retail store, she just wanted a job.

When I told her I had nothing she smiled a left as if asking for a job was all she had to do, maybe before going to apply for welfare.

I may have rambled a bit, hopefully not too much

Wyndham




#61478 Calcined Kaolin? (Glomax)

Posted by Wyndham on 28 June 2014 - 09:51 AM

Slip glazes can crawl or pop off in the firing. Using  about half calcined

(or more)and half raw in a slip glaze recipe will help eliminate that issue.

Many slip glazes with Alberta or Albany are almost all clay.

I try not to have more than 10% raw clay in may glazes with the balance calcined clay. For me 10% will keep most ingredients in suspension and not hard pan.

Wyndham




#60905 Unglazed Terracotta For Cooking On Naked Flame

Posted by Wyndham on 16 June 2014 - 10:23 AM

No, the radiant heat from coals/embers is where you need to investigate. If you have a charcoal fire pit or can have access to making a small cooking fire on the ground, that would be the better way to learn from.

Wyndham




#60902 Unglazed Terracotta For Cooking On Naked Flame

Posted by Wyndham on 16 June 2014 - 09:57 AM

I think you have missed a point in the cooking method. They did not have a gas flame. A gas flame is a relatively short, high temp flame where as a wood and ember fire is slower to develop the flammable gas that ignites into a long slow cooking flame.

Most of the heat is derived from the hot coals which is radiant heat.

The second part is that most cooking is wet cooking, where the liquid in the pot, keeps the vessel cooler that that of a gas flame cooking.

I have even seen on a surviver show where a plastic soda bottle , filled with water was suspended over a low flame wood fire and boiled the water without burning the plastic bottle.

Stove top is out of the question, in this scenario.

Hope this gives some thought to work from.

Wyndham




#60742 10 Cool Trends In Contemporary Ceramics

Posted by Wyndham on 13 June 2014 - 12:02 PM

The  face jugs in the article were of a different style than what the potters of NC & SC make.

Traditional face jugs are ash glazed using fired cones for the teeth and porcelain shards for eyes.

Now if we look at the cultural history of the face jug, we find it's use as a way to keep the social group, morally aware of the consequences of doing evil to one another.

When a person died, a face jug was placed on the grave. If the person were a good person in the community, the face jug would remain intact for a year, then broken to let the soul rise to heaven.

If they were evil in the sight of the group, the jug was broken before the year was up and this condemned their soul to hell.

Folk potters, trying to get a leg up on the competition, decorated the whiskey jugs in distorted faces to attract more jug sales.

Contemporary potters saw that the older pieces were being collected as art, so they began making their own collectible versions and so on....

Most collector in this area, want the traditional style ash glazed face jugs.I doubt if the ones featured in Artnews would sell here but if this were to be a worthy trend, I'm sure some potters here would take note.

As in the "Garlic Plate" thread, if people want them, we'll make them.

The question becomes,what  percentage of ourselves are we, potters for ourselves or potters for the marketplace.

Wyndham




#60704 Why It Goes Off Center?

Posted by Wyndham on 12 June 2014 - 08:30 PM

As others have mentioned, the clay is over worked. Study other youtube videos that show proper pulling and collaring. The shoulder of the pot has become fatigued and can't support the upper neck and rim.

You're doing fine, just work on the basics.

Wyndham 




#60617 10 Cool Trends In Contemporary Ceramics

Posted by Wyndham on 11 June 2014 - 02:38 PM

If this is going to represent us as ceramic art in the cultural centers of the future, we have the same of chance of having a thriving pottery craft future, as the dinosaurs surviving their apocalypse.

Wyndham

 




#60457 Throwing Straight Out Of The Pugger-Yes

Posted by Wyndham on 10 June 2014 - 11:40 AM

It's worth getting use to, like going from a kick wheel to electric. Now if I could only find the recipe for self centering clay :)

Wyndham




#60036 Noob Seeks Advice Building Kiln On The Cheap

Posted by Wyndham on 05 June 2014 - 08:40 AM

You need to learn what clay that's local can do. Some of the most beautiful ceramics are based on low (1800 deg f) clay bodies that are pit fired. Learn what the locals are doing, where they get their clay and how they prep it, then how they fire it. Just because it maybe tourist cr@#@#$p doesn't mean it's not good workable clay, though at a low temp.

Learn how they make their slip for decorating and what wood they use for the firing.

If you look up pit firing you'll see what beauty can be achieved in low temp ware.

After that you can develop your own expression in clay and there maybe other clay beds that can go to higher temps.

Most of the world still uses low temp clay bodies for everyday uses and can be better than higher temp stoneware for certain uses.

Wyndham




#59954 Anyone Else Interested Or Know Anything About Firing Leopard Spot Shinos?

Posted by Wyndham on 04 June 2014 - 08:42 AM

Check out this link.

http://mudfireclaywo...ry-teacher.html

Wyndham