Jump to content


Karen B

Member Since 11 Sep 2010
Offline Last Active Aug 26 2015 11:30 AM
-----

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Large Flat Pieces Cracking During Glaze Firing

23 July 2015 - 04:29 PM

we learn with every step. Clay responds to all these little changes. The grog and the paperclip are good improvements. I still like coils because they let the heat circulate and the clay shrink without sticking. I don't like grog because it can get inside the ware below.
Marcia

Marcia, when you have time, could you post a picture of your coils? I would greatly appreciate it.

Karen


In Topic: Large Flat Pieces Cracking During Glaze Firing

23 July 2015 - 04:28 PM

 

 

Hi Again

I have unloaded the glaze firing and i put sand on my shelf... thankfully no cracks this time, but the sand has stuck to the back of the 3 pieces  and also to some of the shelf,  is this normal & should I try to clean it off the shelf or just put more sand on it for the next firing???  How thick should the layer of sand be? Should you be able to see some the shelf through the sand or should it be totally covered.  What kind of sand should i have used?

I have made some small coil rods to try next time, so will bisque these next time.  Once these are bisqued, Should these be placed under the hearts for the bisque firing as well as the glaze firing?

also you talk about a cookies... are these the same size as the piece to be fired or do you place a few smaller cookies under each item.  Sorry for all the questions but am pretty new and flying solo here with my new kiln.  I have lost many pieces to this cracking business and am very keen to rectify it  :rolleyes:  Can anyone post a picture of the cookies they use?

 

 

Hi Jojess,

I am going to say grog, (because that is what I use), in place of sand, (what you use). When I have grog stuck to the back of my plates, I rub the backs together and it comes off. Or I can use any fired flat bottom to rub off anything that sticks, like grog or kiln wash. The grog should be thin to avoid unevenness. I do leave the grog on my kiln shelves, however, I do rub the sides and bottom with a clean dry green scrubby before placing in the kiln to avoid any stray grains. 

I don't know if you saw it, but I described how to apply the grog to the shelf above. 

 

Hi Karen,  thank you for your hints and tips..i used grog on my shelves for the first time and no cracks in my hearts  yay!!  I am now trying paperclay, rather than the porcelain that i have been using as someone suggested that it maybe more suited to my flat pieces.  I have some more hearts drying so yet to see what they will do in the first firing.

 

 That sounds like a good idea Jo. Let us know how it works. 


In Topic: Using Fresh Leaves For Making Molds

10 July 2015 - 09:24 AM

Are you interested in large leaves? Like as much as 8" across?


In Topic: Large Flat Pieces Cracking During Glaze Firing

10 July 2015 - 09:18 AM

Hi Again

I have unloaded the glaze firing and i put sand on my shelf... thankfully no cracks this time, but the sand has stuck to the back of the 3 pieces  and also to some of the shelf,  is this normal & should I try to clean it off the shelf or just put more sand on it for the next firing???  How thick should the layer of sand be? Should you be able to see some the shelf through the sand or should it be totally covered.  What kind of sand should i have used?

I have made some small coil rods to try next time, so will bisque these next time.  Once these are bisqued, Should these be placed under the hearts for the bisque firing as well as the glaze firing?

also you talk about a cookies... are these the same size as the piece to be fired or do you place a few smaller cookies under each item.  Sorry for all the questions but am pretty new and flying solo here with my new kiln.  I have lost many pieces to this cracking business and am very keen to rectify it  :rolleyes:  Can anyone post a picture of the cookies they use?

 

 

Hi Jojess,

I am going to say grog, (because that is what I use), in place of sand, (what you use). When I have grog stuck to the back of my plates, I rub the backs together and it comes off. Or I can use any fired flat bottom to rub off anything that sticks, like grog or kiln wash. The grog should be thin to avoid unevenness. I do leave the grog on my kiln shelves, however, I do rub the sides and bottom with a clean dry green scrubby before placing in the kiln to avoid any stray grains. 

I don't know if you saw it, but I described how to apply the grog to the shelf above. 


In Topic: Large Flat Pieces Cracking During Glaze Firing

06 July 2015 - 12:00 PM

 

 

 

Here are the two I made with severe cracking on bottom layer. They are about 8" across.

 

Also, getting this figured out is crucial because I had planned to do the same project with the public at the library where I work. Thanks!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beautiful project!