Jump to content


bciskepottery

Member Since 28 Jun 2010
Offline Last Active Jul 21 2014 05:20 PM
-----

#62905 Shelf Grinding

Posted by bciskepottery on 20 July 2014 - 08:46 PM

Would you like eggs and toast with your links?

Would not recommend the diamond pads . . . you'll eat through a ton of them. We just cleaned 21 shelves from a salt firing . . . used carbide grinding stones, stiff putty knives, chisel with hand protector; so serious glaze runs so the angle grinder stayed at the workbench. For small glaze drops, a flat-headed screwdriver and hammer work. You just need to learn how to angle the knife/screwdriver/chisel so that you catch under the lip of the glaze bead. For bad glaze runs, grinder.

And, in all situations . . . wear your respirator, eye protection, and work gloves (no cheap cloth gloves); slivers of glaze can cause serious cuts. And never run your bare hand over the kiln shelf to see if there are any glaze spots that need removal.


#62879 What Makes A Good Mizusashi Good?

Posted by bciskepottery on 20 July 2014 - 05:07 PM

http://www.shozo-mic...ashi/index.html

Sigh. Maybe in another lifetime.


#62442 Where Is The Line For Intellectual Property Rights Vs. Copying Others

Posted by bciskepottery on 14 July 2014 - 07:11 PM

With regard to intellectual property, there are three avenues of protection: copyright, patent, and trademark. Each of these avenues has different criteria for obtaining protection. Google "intellectual property and the arts" and you'll get a number of responses to read up on; avoid the "cell-block lawyers" spouting advice in blogs; go with law firms, arts associations, etc. who have some expertise in the area -- because the area is quite complicated and nuanced.

Potters -- and some other artists/craftspersons -- share because of the common history and role of pottery in the world. The forms are pretty much all out there; doubt we'll come up with anything original. What we do add are our personal approaches for making the form, elements that make the form our own, e.g., many folks make large casseroles, but you can spot a Tony Clennell by the handles a mile away, or unique glazes, artwork etc.

You can copyright/trademark original templates that you came up with (Sandi Pierantozzi), tools (Michael Sherrill's mud ribs and sponges), Giffin grips, etc.

Will that stop someone from copying or making a "new, improved version", e.g, trimming tools with nice foam cushion handles -- no.

Hummel made beautiful small sculptures . . . which were followed by many copiers.

Sharing is good, but we must also respect people who chose not to share -- whatever their reasons. But, if you chose to share, then share everything -- including the 10% feldspar.

It's funny, we complain about Chinese knock-offs and mass produced copies of mugs, but er want the potter next door to give us the low down so we can make their wares or glazes, too.


#62261 Hamada On Hakeme

Posted by bciskepottery on 11 July 2014 - 10:33 PM

Hamada sees a tension between the self-conscious and free-flowing, between attempting to replicate natural phenomena and letting natural phenomena just happen. And we know which side he preferred.

A few years ago, I was in an Akira Satake workshop and we were stretching kohiki slip slabs (white slip over dark clay body). I was looking at my slab trying to figure out how to work around a few tears and surface imperfections. Akira came over and asked what I was doing; I explained. His reply to me was, "Find the imperfection and work with it, make it the central focus." It didn't sink in at the time. But, after several more slabs made and stretched at home, his words finally resonated as I'd look over the slab before me. Not every slab had imperfections, but those that do, I cherish. And, if I try to add imperfections intentionally, the slabs look contrive and unnatural. You learn to work with what the clay gives you.

As for picture envy, not for me. I'll look, appreciate, and learn . . . but rather than replicate, I'll try to apply that technique to my own work. Everything that we see can be improved upon. There is nothing wrong in copying; just don't be content to copy -- make it your own. In Chinese brush painting, students would learn by copying the paintings of the master/teacher . . . until the master/teacher was satisfied with the student's copies. That could take months, years of practice and copying. At that point, the master/teacher would allow the student to paint their own compositions.


#61984 Taste And Feeling Hamada

Posted by bciskepottery on 08 July 2014 - 07:00 AM

http://www.art-newze...0/books0403.htm

Of himself, Hamada has said that it was after reaching the age of seventy that he began to feel mature. In talking about his approach to pot-making he has commented that techniques are difficult enough to learn: '... it took me ten years to learn them but twenty years to forget them... it is the experience - how the experience is accepted - that is important... knowing things sometimes impedes the power of the observation. .. "Good taste" is a formula, but it is not so with "feeling" . . . I often wish that people would take a step further and apply non-established, non-accepted standards and select work that has the true directness of feeling, even if it is lacking in the expected taste. .. If we reflect on our motive for making pottery we can make a start without mistakes.'

Mature at seventy Bciske my friend you may have to wait a little longer than that! :D
So it is the viewer who brings taste, and the pot which gives feeling?
Feel i could sit forever in the presence of some pots.
Zombie in the pottery
Thanks people I'll keep reading a while, too cold to pot here at mo.


I'm told that the potter makes vessels, not tea bowls, and that it is the tea master who chooses which vessels become tea bowls. So, yes, the pot gives feeling and the user determines function.

I may be a smart-ass, but I'm an old smart-ass on the downward trajectory toward maturity.


#61957 Taste And Feeling Hamada

Posted by bciskepottery on 07 July 2014 - 07:37 PM

http://www.art-newze...0/books0403.htm

Of himself, Hamada has said that it was after reaching the age of seventy that he began to feel mature. In talking about his approach to pot-making he has commented that techniques are difficult enough to learn: '... it took me ten years to learn them but twenty years to forget them... it is the experience - how the experience is accepted - that is important... knowing things sometimes impedes the power of the observation. .. "Good taste" is a formula, but it is not so with "feeling" . . . I often wish that people would take a step further and apply non-established, non-accepted standards and select work that has the true directness of feeling, even if it is lacking in the expected taste. .. If we reflect on our motive for making pottery we can make a start without mistakes.'


#61649 Hakame

Posted by bciskepottery on 01 July 2014 - 08:55 PM

http://lucyfagellapo...om-and-slip.jpg
nice image of Catherine white applying slip hakeme method  spelling/ hakame ?




Jump to about 8:50 and see Don Reitz loading up the mop for little brushwork action.


#61641 Hakame

Posted by bciskepottery on 01 July 2014 - 06:47 PM

With glaze, you'll want one that is "stiff" or "fat" . . . one that stays in place and doesn't move when melting. The second bowl seems more shallow than the first picture; gravity will come into play. It also looks like your glaze melts and flows easily at temperature. Perhaps for the hakeme decoration you'll want a more matte or semi matte glaze that does not melt completely and stays in place. Another key is how the two glazes interact; the first picture seems to show the two glazes melting together nicely, probably because they are similar in composition; two glazes with the same base recipe are not likely to work well. You don't have that happening in the second picture.

As for getting the flow, you'll need to practice on paper. Loading a hakeme brush made of broom bristles is far different than loading a brush of animal hair. Also experiment with different viscosities of glaze . . . thick glaze vs. thinned glaze. Once you find you can get the effect you want on paper, move on to your pottery.


#61300 Clay For Extrusion

Posted by bciskepottery on 23 June 2014 - 03:20 PM

-they decied in past few years to generally have softer clay as stock.

 
Hum.... clay is sold by the pound, wet.  X pounds dry materials @ X $ per pound = ???  X pounds of WATER @ Y $ per pound = ??? 
 
Wonder why the change to softer clay......... hummmmmmmmmmmm..........  :rolleyes:
 
best,
 
......................john


Given the warnings about water shortages in the future, in the not too distant future we may see the day where the water costs more than the raw materials.

But, really, you don't think the clay makers would add more water just to increase . . . profits? What happened to clay being dirt cheap. Why, that's Un-American and crony capitalism at it's worse.


#60978 Canvas Texture On Handbuilt Work

Posted by bciskepottery on 16 June 2014 - 09:33 PM

It seems like you are paying for a name, not a piece of pottery. I have nothing against simple forms; in fact, I try to keep my forms as simple as possible -- its an aesthetic I like. I use a lot of texture myself. Glaze colors are so-so; nothing screamed to me, you gotta add that glaze to your palette. Nothing seems to warrant $175 for a cheeseboard, $250 for a platter, or $95 for a spoon -- none of which look like they could withstand any regular use. But, if there are folks willing to shell out that kind of money, then go for it; but I expect she has a following and would fall under "trendy" as opposed to "trend" (see thread on cool trends in ceramics).


#60968 What Is The Most Dangerous Thing In Your Studio?

Posted by bciskepottery on 16 June 2014 - 08:07 PM

What I think I know vs. What I don't know.


#60874 Black Interior On Terracotta?

Posted by bciskepottery on 15 June 2014 - 08:23 PM

Welcome!
 
I'm curious about where you go the idea to use a grill to fire your pots.  You're like the third person in a month to think of using a cooking device to do so.  Is there a youtube video on it?
 
I recommend saving the grill for grilling and joining a pottery club to fire your work, even pit firing benefits from a bisque.


A while back CAD featured Sumi Van Dassow doing a pit fire in a Webber kettle grill as an alternate firing method.

http://ceramicartsda...rilling-season/


#60873 Possible Scumming On Glaze?

Posted by bciskepottery on 15 June 2014 - 08:20 PM

Is there any ingredient in the glaze (white) that could be forming crystals in the glaze bucket (e.g., tin oxide)? and have you eliminated flakes of kiln wash as a source?


#60610 10 Cool Trends In Contemporary Ceramics

Posted by bciskepottery on 11 June 2014 - 02:04 PM

If your sales are slumping or are feeling uninspired, maybe you need to reinvigorate your wares with the latest trends . . .

http://www.artnews.c...ry-ceramic-art/

 
 
I'm not sure if some of these will help slumping sales; Customer:  "How am I supposed to use this mug?  It was cut apart, rearranged, and has holes everywhere!"


Yeah, but now you can charge 10X for it . . . and maybe make the cover of a monthly ceramics mag. After which you can double the price again.


#60519 Garlic Plates

Posted by bciskepottery on 10 June 2014 - 06:53 PM

Attended a workshop with Tony Clennell this past weekend; he always leaves attendees with any number of quotable quotes. One seems appropriate here:

"The better they work in the kitchen, the less money you'll get." (Can you get any lower than $9.99 for a set, plus $6.99 shipping/handling?)

His other top quote was:

"No body needs anything we make."