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Arnold Howard

Member Since 26 May 2010
Offline Last Active Oct 14 2014 02:52 PM
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#67511 How To Transport My Kiln

Posted by Arnold Howard on 09 October 2014 - 09:39 AM

Here is a video showing how to crate a top-loading kiln:

 

 

Sincerely,

 

Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com




#64679 Dang!&*&$#--Having Touble Getting Elements To Lay In Groove...

Posted by Arnold Howard on 18 August 2014 - 04:14 PM

Thanks ya'll. I'll keep working on it. I may have to nibble a bit on the firebrick to get the pins to go in at an angle. Maybe some bent-nosed needle nose pliers will do it. I hate to put the pins straight in. AHHHH just had an idea. I may be able to dremel off some 45 degree places on the back side of the lip that's causing the problem. I have an old Jenkins kiln that I hauled off for someone. The element channels ARE beveled at a 45 possibly so pins can be inserted that way. hmmmm               ja

The SnF-24 should not need element pins. If it were my kiln, I would not alter the brick grooves to make room for the pins. Push the element all the way to the back of the groove where the firebricks meet, the element should lie flat in the grooves when you fire the kiln.

 

The video link shows an employee installing an element at the factory. (It is near the 3 minute mark.) Notice that he pushes the element into the groove and maintains a constant pressure against the element. If you let go of the element half way through the installation, the element will not stay in the groove later.

 

 

Sincerely,

 

Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com




#63006 Why Don't Elements Glow Outside The Kiln.

Posted by Arnold Howard on 22 July 2014 - 10:04 AM

Twisting the ends of the element with an extra piece of wire reduces the electrical resistance at the pigtails. If an element connector is loose, however, the connector will glow pink. The connectors and terminals must be tight. A loose connector on a relay will produce enough heat to destroy the relay.

 

Sincerely,

 

Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com




#61363 What I Need To Know About Changing The Thermocouple.

Posted by Arnold Howard on 25 June 2014 - 11:54 AM

I have been doing a cool down program for years, which bring out the speckles in my stoneware nicely. But, when I spoke to the guy at Skutt, he said he never heard of a cool down program like mine(with attitude). So now I am wondering if I have been doing it wrong. I hold at several temperatures and let the kiln cool from one to the other without putting in a rate to slow the cooling from one to the other. But I start holding at 1800 and let it drop at 50 degree intervals until 1550 with the longest hold at 1600.

There are many ways to program the Ramp-Hold mode. To slow the cooling, most people add a segment that contains a specific cooling rate. Adding segments with holds and full rates, as you have done, is another way to achieve similar results. (The full rate allows the kiln to cool at its normal cooling rate.)

 

Including witness cones on at least one shelf in every firing will simplify the calibration of a new thermocouple. The witness cones will also alert you if the thermocouple begins to drift in temperature.

 

Sincerely,

 

Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com




#58454 Controller Upgrade/replacement

Posted by Arnold Howard on 13 May 2014 - 06:06 PM

If you determine that the controller is receiving power from the transformer and that the controller is dead, you can return it to Bartlett Instruments. Sometimes they can refurbish a controller for much less than the cost of a new one.

 

Sincerely,

 

Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P.,

Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com

 




#53072 I'm A Glass Worker Buying A Ceramics/glass Kiln, And I Have A Q About Por...

Posted by Arnold Howard on 21 February 2014 - 12:21 PM

Thank you for reply! I'm limited in my choice because we're working with a 30 amp breaker and re-wiring is not currently an option. I'm not completely up on my electrical knowledge...will pulling only 20 amps mean that it'll take longer to hit max temp, or that there is a chance it will not hit it at all?

I didn't realize that glass was your primary medium. In that case, the Janus-1613 may be a better choice than the TnF- or Xpress-1613-3. At any rate, the 27-amp TnF- and Xpress-1613-3 kilns can fire on a 240 volt, 30 amp circuit. The circuit must be wired with #10 copper or heavier.

 

By the way, I hope it doesn't seem that I'm trying to sell Paragon kilns on this forum. I rarely answer posts that ask for purchasing recommendations.

 

Sincerely,

 

Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com




#53052 I'm A Glass Worker Buying A Ceramics/glass Kiln, And I Have A Q About Por...

Posted by Arnold Howard on 21 February 2014 - 10:17 AM

Hi, I'm looking at either

 

http://www.clay-king...ess_11_9_3.html

 

or

 

http://www.clay-king...janus_1613.html

 

for my new studio. We have both 120 and 220 v electric with 30 amp breakers.

 

My question is: will porcelain FULLY vitrify at 2300°F (the first kiln) or 2350°F (the second)?

Thanks for considering a Paragon kiln. Of the two kilns you are looking at, I recommend the 1613, but not in the Janus series. The reason is that since you will fire porcelain, you need a high amperage kiln. The TnF-1613-3 and the Xpress-1613-3 pull 27 amps (6,400 watts). The Janus-1613 pulls only 20 amps (4,800 watts). The TnF-1613-3 was designed by Seeley during the mid-1990s. They tested literally hundreds of porcelain doll heads in the prototypes of that kiln.

 

The only difference between the TnF-1613-3 and the Xpress-1613-3 is the controller. The TnF-series controller has 12 keys, and the Xpress-series has 3 keys. The Sentry Xpress 3-key controller seems to be gaining in popularity over the Sentry 12-key controller, because the 3-key is less expensive and has most of the features of the 12-key. However, programming the 12-key is faster, because you can type the temperatures from a keypad. The temperatures in the Sentry Xpress 3-key are selected by scrolling.

 

Sincerely,

 

Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com




#51709 Kiln Circuit Design.

Posted by Arnold Howard on 04 February 2014 - 10:12 AM

A loose wire connected to a relay will overheat and burn out, causing the relay to fail. When that happens, replace not only the relay but the wires that are connected to it, or at least the wire terminals. This is because once a push-on terminal becomes too hot, the terminal will lose its spring tension, resulting in a loose connection. That, in turn, will cause the new relay to fail prematurely, too.

 

From your description, an element connector is loose. That will cause the element connector to glow pink. I would replace the element connector. Make sure the new connector is tight.

 

I would not redesign the wiring in the switch box. It would be far easier to obtain the original wiring diagram and to use that as a guide. You might be able to identify the kiln from the electrical data plate or by posting a picture of your kiln.

 

Sincerely,

 

Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com

 




#49885 Considering Getting My Own Kiln

Posted by Arnold Howard on 10 January 2014 - 02:01 PM

I'm considering getting my own kiln, but I know next to nothing about how to operate one, where it needs to live while not in use...nothing!  I belong to a city operated studio for a very nominal annual fee where we can have everything fired at no additional cost, so it might be difficult to justify the cost. I'd like to find a "Kilns for Dummys" type book to learn more....is there such a thing?

If you want a copy of our ceramic kiln manual, I will mail it to you. Just email your address to me. A lot of research went into the manual, and most of the information is general.

 

Sincerely,

 

Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com




#42695 Help With Firing A Paragon Model Snf82 Kiln

Posted by Arnold Howard on 16 September 2013 - 12:18 PM

Mark- thank you but I actually already have that info on the service manual and kiln sitter.  That doesn't seem to help me either because it doesn't talk about the specific switches on the kiln which is what confuses me.  When I did a bisque and/or glaze fire it's only taking me 4 hours and not 8 which is why I can't figure out how to slow it down or get it to fire longer. 

I checked the SnF-82 web page. You couldn't find the answer to your question, because one of the instruction manual links at the bottom of the kiln page pointed to an out-dated manual. Sorry. I have updated the link, so it now points to the latest manual. Please see pages 13 - 15 of the following manual:

 

http://www.paragonwe...nfo.cfm?CID=148

 

Here is the updated SnF-82 kiln page:

 

http://www.paragonweb.com/SNF82.cfm

 

Sincerely,

 

Arnold Howard

 

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com




#41230 New Home "studio"

Posted by Arnold Howard on 22 August 2013 - 08:31 AM

So, I'm looking for advise about commercial glazes, firing, electric kilns etc.

For the first firing, place the shelves, posts, pyrometric witness cones, and a couple of test pieces in the kiln. Space the shelves evenly throughout the kiln with posts. I would not load the kiln with prized pieces until you are confident that the kiln will fire to your satisfaction.

 

Before you decide on firing to cone 10, make sure the kiln will actually fire that hot. Also, you may decide that cone 6 is more feasible than cone 10, because you will get more firings out of a set of elements at cone 6 than you will at cone 10.

 

Sincerely,Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com




#36877 Applying Kiln Wash

Posted by Arnold Howard on 12 June 2013 - 11:04 AM

Thank you Oldlady, Mark and Pres.

Oldlady - I'm sorry I guess I typed what I knew I meant not what it sounded like? I meant the inside of the bottom of the kiln, the floor part inside where you would sit stuff on. The kiln is fairly small with a chamber about 15x23 so not sure if putting a whole shelf in there just above the bottom is feasible.


You should apply kiln wash to the kiln's firebrick bottom. Be careful not to get kiln wash into an element groove. The kiln wash should last for years and will help to protect the bottom from glaze should you ever overfire the kiln.

Sincerely,

Arnold Howard
Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA / www.twitter.com/arnoldhoward
ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com


#28714 lithography decal

Posted by Arnold Howard on 31 January 2013 - 02:10 PM

Thank you Arnold I am waiting for your news ,


I wasn't clear. Sorry. I meant that if I were you, I would ask Atlas Ink. You can contact them on their website. They are very knowledgeable. They may have already produced ceramic decal ink or know if it is feasible. Silk screening can lay down a much thicker layer of ink than is possible with offset printing. Bumper stickers are generally printed by silk screen, because the thicker the layer of ink, the longer it tends to last in sunlight. A thick layer of silk screen ink would probably also fire better than a thin layer of offset ink.

Sincerely,

Arnold Howard
Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA
ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com


#28669 lithography decal

Posted by Arnold Howard on 29 January 2013 - 05:55 PM

Hello
I want to know if there is a kind of ceramic offset lithography ink that can print ceramic decals by offset machine instead of current methods?


That is an interesting question. I would ask Atlas Ink in Dallas, Texas if they could make an offset ink that could print ceramic decals. Atlas is a very good ink company. We use that ink for the Paragon catalog and manuals.

Sincerely,

Arnold Howard
Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA
ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com


#14031 Kiln comparisons

Posted by Arnold Howard on 23 February 2012 - 09:24 AM

Thanks Mark. I never thought about the quality of the pyrometers...but that is important to me. Do you know if the digital controllers are all made by the same manufacturing company? My husband and I have had a run of bad luck with digital controllers on everything lately, including our gas stove, furnace thermostat and eliptical machine!


Skutt, L&L, and Olympic use the Bartlett Instruments controller. Paragon uses the Orton controller. In 1987 we introduced the DTC 100 controller, which we designed. In the early 1990s we gave that technology to Bartlett Instruments. They improved upon the DTC 100 for us by adding segments and controlled cooling. We introduced their updated controller as the DTC 600, which later became the DTC 800 and DTC 1000. In 2001 we switched over the the Orton controller, which we call the Sentry.

By pyrometer, do you mean thermocouple? The S-type is the best thermocouple for potters. The thermocouple wires in the S-type are extremely thin, but as long as the thermocouple is not jarred, it will last for many years, and without temperature drift. If you bump the S-type thermocouple and break the ceramic protection tube, you will most likely destroy the thermocouple, which is quite expensive. The K-type thermocouple is standard throughout the industry because of the cost, but the S-type is far superior. It is optional on both the Orton and the newest Bartlett controllers. If you change thermocouple types, however, you must configure the controller for the new thermocouple.

Sincerely,

Arnold Howard
Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA
ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com