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Marcia Selsor

Member Since 16 May 2010
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 04:20 PM
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#117935 Electric Vs Gas Firing - Surface Look - Clothes Or Skin

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 06 December 2016 - 02:45 AM

I ThInk that is more dependent on the combination of clay, glaze and firing rather than atmosphere. Firing down in oxidation certainly enriches the surfaces on certain glazes. SO in my opinion i would say no. BUt often fast auto firings with commercial glazes I would say yes.
I know the look you are talking about.
Marcia


#117799 Coloring Clay

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 04 December 2016 - 09:29 AM

You can go either way. Making underglazes with a frit would be cheaper in the long run. Val Cushing's ^04 recipe is frit 3110 25%, EPK 25%and stain 25% The 25% stain would depend on what shade you really want.
. It comes to 75 but not my recipe.
COmmercial underglazes can sometimes be pro blematic. Sometimes they scale, or flake. many people in Texas love Mayco underglazes. THey get good results. Amacoalso has several good lines of underglaze for different temperatures.
Marcia


#117662 Magic Ingredient / Simple Ingredient Change To Turn Cone 10 Glazes To Cone 6?

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 02 December 2016 - 08:32 AM

The easiest way is ti start by adding 10% gerstley borate. Adjust from there.
Marcia
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#117642 Bisque Ware History

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 01 December 2016 - 07:28 PM

bisque firing was developed for tin glaze in the Middle East in what was Persia at the time.
Somewhere between 900 and 1000 AD. It was after a battle where the Persians captured the war goods from China . They had a Proto porcelain piece that inspired the king to have his chemist develop a process that imitated the white surface. Due to the sandy low fired clay in the region, the chemist developed the bisque firing for the tin glaze to fit the bisqued clay. Also another step developed closely after this time Minai enamel ware was made. It was only produced for about 80 years. This required a third firing as did lusterware.I have given two Nceca lectures on this. In Las Vegas,in a panel on Single Firing...mine lecture was "Why Once Is Not Enough" and in Louis ville where Stephani Stephenson and I gave a two part presentation on "Architectural Ceramics from Central Asia to Spain" (me) and "Colonial New Spain to Hollywood" by Stephani.

We had a full lecture hall.
Marcia


#117553 Looking For Alternative Ways To Hold Down Pots For Trimming

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 30 November 2016 - 04:06 PM

The most simple way I know is to dip the lip, tap to center, and trim.The wet lip holds it on for long enough to trim.

Marcia


#117488 Qotw: What Is The Coolest And Most Helpful Thingy You Have In Your Studio?

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 29 November 2016 - 12:35 PM

I like this rubbery silicon baking shapes for making plaster forms. Clean release from the plaster. I use them for any excess plaster when I am making larger molds.
Marcia


#117465 Qotw: What Is The Coolest And Most Helpful Thingy You Have In Your Studio?

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 29 November 2016 - 08:07 AM

wheels! As I am packing I am very thankful I made dollies for glaze buckets and clay storage. most things can roll onto the truck They'll still need to be secured, I but I have two big rolling cupboards to put the 5 gallon buckets.
Marcia


#117421 Am I Screwed?

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 28 November 2016 - 05:36 PM

Just keep a log and make that notation. If they look great do it again! If they look interesting , but not what you thought you'd get, fire the next one like you would have on this one. Not a big deal.
Show us the results tomorrow!
Marcia


#117392 Is Cone 6 Practical For Domestic Ware In The Uk?

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 28 November 2016 - 01:15 PM

^6 Frost is a true ^6 body. It also is very translucent at that temperature. My glazes worked on it too.
Marcia


#117344 Is Cone 6 Practical For Domestic Ware In The Uk?

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 27 November 2016 - 09:08 PM

Cone 6 has grown in popularity because it uses less energy and is greener , its cheaper, and the results can be as attractive as any ^9-10. I worked for 20 years on ^6reduction glazes and the last 16 on ^6 oxidation. The results are actually very pleasing and look like ^10. So please continue to investigate. I'd recommend Michael Baileys ^6 Galzes Book since he is based in the UK and the chemicals will be more familiar to you.
Marcia
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#117104 Help Clay Body Craters Or Blisters?

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 24 November 2016 - 09:49 PM

definitely bloating which usually means overtired or gases did not fire out in bisque and were trapped in a fast firing during the ^6 firing in simple terms.How fast was the glaze firing? And how high did you bisque and how fast?

Marcia


#117007 Stool/chair Height?

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 23 November 2016 - 06:25 PM

It isn't just the height but the angle about 20-25 degrees reduces the stress on the lumbar.

Marcia


#116961 Why Are Some Glazes Nicer To Deal With?

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 23 November 2016 - 08:17 AM

I think glazes that have a good amount of clay in them are easier to work with. frits can be persnickety.
Just me 2 cents.
Marcia


#116916 Glazes For Reduction Firings

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 22 November 2016 - 02:30 PM

Here is a copy of my ^6 reduction workshop I taught in Corpus Christi

Attached File  ^6 Reduction workshop.pdf   131.57KB   33 downloads


#116868 Is Cone 6 Practical For Domestic Ware In The Uk?

Posted by Marcia Selsor on 21 November 2016 - 06:38 PM

So you have to find the right clay that matures and adjust your glazes to not craze. I make functional ^6 in Ox. I use to make it in ^6 reduction from 1980-2000. You need to work on it.
Marcia
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