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Chris Campbell

Member Since 07 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Aug 17 2016 10:31 AM
*****

#110817 Spooze Peggy Heer's clay patch

Posted by Chris Campbell on 31 July 2016 - 06:52 PM

It was a shock to see Peggy's name here.
She was such a huge influence in my clay life even though I never met her.

She was dying when I first saw her posts on clayart. She could barely get around her home physically, but she always made it to the keyboard so she could share everything she knew.
As her illness got worse, her determination to share got even stronger.
In my mind she was an incredible inspiration and more than made up for the little minds who hoard their precious recipes and tips.


#106763 Painting On 'jet Black Underglaze Stain' To Leatherhard Clay

Posted by Chris Campbell on 12 May 2016 - 10:47 AM

I would recommend painting it on sooner next time ... Maybe at what we call cheese hard ... ( Think of a young cheddar ). If the piece has dried hard you could try painting on a thin coat of water first to open up the surface a bit. This could work better than thinning the underglaze. Thinned out underglaze might not give you solid deep colors.

After you paint it on let it dry until it is dull, then you might want a second coat. Again wait until it is dull to start on sgraffito.
Smudging is one of the challenges which is why you have to work quickly and make the mark you want the first time. You should be able to clean up smudges a bit when the piece is totally dry.
  • oly likes this


#106712 Submit Your Community Challenge Ideas

Posted by Chris Campbell on 11 May 2016 - 04:52 PM

I'd like to see people choose one form ... Bowl, mug, vase, container, casserole ... And execute the form several times using different techniques ... Throwing, coiling, soft slab building, firm slab building, slump molds, hump mods, pinching, free form ... Whatever. Just test how many ways you can get to where you are going.


#106684 Stain Percentage To Make Colored Slip

Posted by Chris Campbell on 11 May 2016 - 09:27 AM

If you just want a small amount of slip for decorating or whatever you can mix it easily in a blender. Add water then add wet clay until the mixture is as thick as you want it. It is much easier to use leftover scraps if you let them dry out then soak in water.
Percentages of Mason stain depend on how intense your want your colors to be. Yellow, pink, violet etc. might need anywhere from 8 - 20% stain whereas dark greens, dark Blues, Browns and blacks only need 5-8%.
Testing with your own clay body is the only way to find out.


#106617 Giving Shoppers A Sense Of Scale

Posted by Chris Campbell on 10 May 2016 - 09:14 AM

I hear you Paul!
For years I saw the work of a famous potter in magazines and was blown away by the work thinking it was massive ... In real life they were about 6" wide and 2" high. Everything then clicked into place.
I have seen people put coins near a piece or a ruler at the bottom if size was deceiving.


#106521 Does Anyone Know How To Achieve Similar Results To This?

Posted by Chris Campbell on 08 May 2016 - 11:07 AM

Welcome to the forum!

That looks like a variation of terra sigilatta combined with a carved surface ...

You can search this forum for many past discussions of terra sigilatta or go to the link on the top left of this page and find a lot of tutorials and videos on the Ceramic Arts Daily site.

It is not that difficult to learn and you will enjoy the process. It involves coating the pot with a thin slip then rubbing it until it shines. It is a low fire process.


#106466 Could Use Yer Opinions/thoughts

Posted by Chris Campbell on 07 May 2016 - 11:16 AM

Wait to read Mea's post for sure ...I too will be waiting as they are always excellent ....

I agree with her that nowadays it is cheap, fast and easy to get business cards printed. So yes, putting them in your work is a good idea. It does not mean you are committing yourself to anything more than identifying yourself.

People ALWAYS say you should sell your work simply because they cannot really imagine any other reason for making pottery ... Or they cannot think of anything else to say. It definitely does not mean they know anything about pottery or the marketplace.
Just smile and thank them for the input, then do whatever you want to do.


#106287 Pricing For Beginner's Piece

Posted by Chris Campbell on 04 May 2016 - 12:27 PM

My head feels like it is going to explode!! No wonder potters are poor.

Price by weight? Price by height?
Going by size and weight, the Mona Lisa is worth less that the black velvet art for sale at the gas station.

Far better to price by comparable work ... be it in the show, on in your local department store or online websites.


#106242 Handbuilding Advice Please For Newbie

Posted by Chris Campbell on 03 May 2016 - 07:00 PM

I think you will find working with coils to be satisfying and fun. Just find a nice terra cotta clay, take your time with it, enjoy the process and post pictures when you are done so we can see.


#106241 New To Clay :where Can I Source Information For Hand Building Tiny Figurines

Posted by Chris Campbell on 03 May 2016 - 06:57 PM

Hi Judy

I would recommend you head into the Ceramic Arts Daily part of the site ... You will end up with hours of great info and videos on working with clay. You will also find that your choices are limitless so don't box yourself in. There are hundreds of clays that will suit your ideas ... and almost as many ways to get there.
Just click the button on the top left of the page and get ready to have fun!


#106230 Qotw: .... What Would Be A Logical Follow Up Question?

Posted by Chris Campbell on 03 May 2016 - 05:17 PM

You would find the start of my 'Throwing Colored Clay Every Way I Can Think Of' project ....

 

Attached Files




#106221 Pricing For Beginner's Piece

Posted by Chris Campbell on 03 May 2016 - 03:59 PM

One aspect that might influence your decision would be ... Where do the profits from the sale of the work go?
If say, you get half and the school gets half then think of it as contributing to your school's future.

If it's for 100% profit to you ... then you just have to consider if you want that piece out in the world with your name on it. Is it worth the $40-$50 you might feel comfortable charging?

You are 100% correct ... it is your opinion that counts when considering the sale of your work. You are most likely correct in your judgement of the piece.

Good luck with your pottery future! : - )


#105986 Large Platter Broke In Half In Bisque Firing. Anything To Do With It?

Posted by Chris Campbell on 30 April 2016 - 11:01 AM

When I am teaching my colored clay/neriage/nerikome classes, my number one piece of advice is ... SLOW DOWN.

 

Consider all the things you are asking your clay to do ...

you have colored it, shaped it into patterns or designs ... it has a hundred places it needs to connect ... you have rolled it, stretched and molded it into your idea of a good form.

That clay has had it!!!

Give it time to settle, treat it gently as you go forward.

You have already invested so much time and attention in the production that it is a shame to lose it all by hurrying the firing.

 

I don't fire slow, but I never fire colored clay on 'fast'. Medium is good.

I usually use the ramping programs to fire up and do controlled cooling down to 1100. Electric kilns cool much too quickly for many kinds of work.




#105981 Etsy Sale Confusion

Posted by Chris Campbell on 30 April 2016 - 10:07 AM

I agree 100% with Mea and Joseph ... Cheap lesson. Give her the refund and the mugs.
You were the one that posted the picture on your site ...
She did not read the fine print but NO ONE does ... That is why shifty people hide stuff there.
Refund and move on ... Lesson learned.


#105881 Making Strong Bond To Survive Bouncing During The Shipment

Posted by Chris Campbell on 28 April 2016 - 06:21 PM

Being a lazy potter, I would try slip and firing them but if that did not work I would just glue them after. You can use a tight epoxy glue or a more forgiving silicone type glue or both. It's the final presentation that counts and Galleris don't like pieces that they have to worry about.