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JBaymore

Member Since 06 Apr 2010
Online Last Active Today, 07:55 PM
*****

#62671 How Fast Do You Run Your Wheel When Centering?

Posted by JBaymore on 17 July 2014 - 09:24 PM

The speed of the shell isn't what dictates the function of the outcome. it is the skill of the hands.

 

Amen... and amen.

 

My favorite wheel is a Korean/Japanese wood kickwheel.  No momentum to speak of.

 

best,

 

........................john




#62630 How Fast Do You Run Your Wheel When Centering?

Posted by JBaymore on 17 July 2014 - 03:43 PM

SLOW>>>>SLOW >>>>>>>SLOW.

 

Speed is the Dark Side........ decieve you it will. :ph34r:

 

Also...............don't confuse speed of revolution with torque (power).  Wheel HP affects torque rather than than speed. 

 

best,

 

....................john




#62617 To Share Or Not To Share

Posted by JBaymore on 17 July 2014 - 12:19 PM

So when does copying happen between professionals?

 

It doesn't happen.  Because if one is copying in that fashion....... there is only one professional present. B)

 

best,

 

.......................john




#62616 Hakeme Slip Recipe

Posted by JBaymore on 17 July 2014 - 12:08 PM

Try the broom bristles..... I have one made with those to that works great.

 

Try every stiff coarse brush you can find.  I've used a toilet bowl brush in the past... that works good. (I'm a frugal potter like most, but in this case...... new... not used ;) ). 

 

Experiment.

 

best,

 

....................john




#62452 Non-Legal Ways To Address Copying Issue

Posted by JBaymore on 14 July 2014 - 08:35 PM

If I spend any more time thinking about it, then I'm just doing what they want me to do: think about them.

 

Back to .... "Stay Calm and Make More Work."

 

best,

 

...................john




#62346 Non-Legal Ways To Address Copying Issue

Posted by JBaymore on 13 July 2014 - 11:13 AM

Here again... like the "black clay" discussion... we simply do not have the WHOLE picture. One side profile.

 

I'd love to see pictures for the work of BOTH individuals side by side.

 

And then .... just for yucks..... put up some pictrues of "well respected" artists by the other two ...... side by side with the people (or works) THEY have been influcenced by.

 

It has often been said that the "originality" of your work is directly linked to the obscurity of your sources.

 

best,

 

....................john




#62340 Mixing Black Clay Body - Cone 10 - Need Expertise

Posted by JBaymore on 13 July 2014 - 10:23 AM

 In this relationship/setting, for the instructor to deliberately share incomplete information without disclosure just strikes me as wrong. 

 

I and my colleagues (at the college level) frequently discuss how we gave a particular student some feedback on something........... and then later discovered that the person had taken that single piece of information and had ignored all the other things that they already knew about the ceramic process... and went off on a total "blinders on" tangent and did something totally absurd with that information.  And that action then of course "bit them in the butt"..........   And then they were flabbergasted that WE had given them that information.  (Eventually ,........ they usually see the context of what they did and how they screwed it all up.  Hindsight can be powerful.)

 

Maybe the instructor would have NEVER anticipated that this particular student would suddenly go off and produce a whole body of work with the untested reformulation and even plan on showing the work produced....... without taking all the knowledge that they already had about ceramics and doing things like the necessary TESTING WORK before ever doing such a thing. 

 

I again come back to the fact that we have NO idea the context of this whole discussion.

 

There are many "styles" of instruction.  In the US we geneally try to give "constructive feedback" and in some cases "prescriptive feedback".  In some cultures the norm is "destructive feedback".  I've heard tales of apprentices who had worked hard for a full day finding hundreds of the forms they'd made broken to bits the next morning with one single one left standing.  No other feedback.  Tough love.

 

I agree that if the instructor did this deliberately to cause the problem .......... NOT good.

 

best,

 

.......................john




#62339 Inspiration, Appropriation Or Downright Copying?

Posted by JBaymore on 13 July 2014 - 10:07 AM

Mel Jacobsen tells a very instructive story about "originality":

 

He was apprenticed in Japan. As the "American" he was looked at as the "creative one" amongst the apprentices. His sensei challenged him to come up with a new form. Most every night after he had completed the studio work he was doing for his senesi... he worked at coming up with a good original form. He would leave the piece on his sensei's shelves. The next day on his shelves would be a book opened to a picture of the form. This went on for about a year.

 

One assignment I use in my advanced BFA throwing course is a "copy the masters" assignment. I give the students a series of choices of a piece to recreate. (I do some specific editing as to who gets which choices.) These are to look like "3 dimentional Xerox copies". Finish fired... to match (brings in the full spectruim of the ceramic process learning). This assognment is intended to develop the EYE, and to develop handling skills. They never fully succeed........ and I don't really expect them to.  It is the pursuit that is important... not who "wins". Nothing wrong with copying..... if it is done in the appropriate context for the appropriate reasons. (Pieces are signed as "copies".)

 

So next we get to "traditional" ceramic work.

 

Master and apprentice. The apprentice spends (typically) something like 7 years working to make the master's pots. By the time they become independent, the work they produce looks basically identical to the master's. In a lot of cultures, this skill anmd trained eye is greatly applauded. The passing on of a tradition.

 

When your work stops loooking like other's pieces and look like yours... you've matured as an artist (not necessarily as a craftsperson). When you have amassed the technical and handling skills to flawlessly (most of the time) execute your ideas...... you've also matured as a craftsperson.

 

When you put the two togetehr.... you probably actually know what you are doing. :)

 

best,

 

.....................john




#62335 Non-Legal Ways To Address Copying Issue

Posted by JBaymore on 13 July 2014 - 09:42 AM

For non-legal ways of dealing with the copying......... you could blow up her workspace in the studio. That would certainly be "non-legal". ;)

 

Seriously.... keep making your work. You'll do it differently. Look at how many people try to make Malcom Davis and Tom Coleman American Shino pots. They don't.

 

"Stay Calm and Make More Work."

 

best,

 

..........................john




#62289 Mixing Black Clay Body - Cone 10 - Need Expertise

Posted by JBaymore on 12 July 2014 - 01:55 PM

One thing I have leared from teaching for 40 some years is that when you hear a story being told by someone else about what transpired... you are not always getting the 'whole picture'.  You are getting a single viewpoint on the genesis of the situation.   

 

Sometimes what the student hears/sees and what the instructor was saying/doing are completely different.

 

It would be interesting to hear the instructor's side of the same story about how the situation reached this point.

 

Iverall, Chris summed it all up nicely in her posting above.

 

best,

 

.................john




#62163 Refiring Question

Posted by JBaymore on 10 July 2014 - 09:43 AM

Plates are flat objects sitting on THICK thermal masses called kiln shelves. When the kiln is heated up, the exposed thin plate rims will heat pretty quickly and evenly. But because of the thermal mass of the plate bottom and the kiln shelf, the poor circulation with kiln atmosphere on the back side of the plate, and the fact that radiant heat transfer (particularly if this is an electric kiln) is not typically hitting even the plates top surface well......... it can cause the plates (and low wide bowls) to crack.  Rim expands... bottom does not at the same time.

 

Almost the same effect happens in reverse if ther kiln is cooled too quickly due to the cooling retarding of the thermal mass of the plate bottom on the kiln shelf.  Rim contractss... bottom does not at the same time.

 

best,

 

......................john




#62019 Slip Casting. Is It The Best Option For My Project?

Posted by JBaymore on 08 July 2014 - 12:11 PM

. Furthermore, you may want to research the demand for your product. Will these objects in clay stand up to similar products in glass?

 

Yeah... guaranteed.... offshore manufacturers will be doing knock-offs in a heartbeat if there is a market.  You'll need to get in fast, make the money... and be gone before the knockoffs that will be cheaper start to appear.

 

Posting that drawing probably was a bad idea.

 

best,

 

.........................john




#61878 Chimney Build

Posted by JBaymore on 06 July 2014 - 07:36 PM

There are things to be said for having a smaller kiln ALSO. I have a big wood kiln, a medium gas kiln, and a small electric kiln. I am thinking of adding a small gas kiln now......... maybe 6-8 cubic feet. For quick tests of ideas/glazes/bodies.

 

Will you "outgrow" the kiln .... likely. But you have to start somewhere. And starting with something you can fire often as a newer potter........ that is a GOOD thing.

 

Keep in mind.... maybe you can add a second kiln down the road.

 

best,

 

.....................john




#61779 I Know This Has Been Asked Before, But Maybe More Specific Answers? - Shows

Posted by JBaymore on 04 July 2014 - 04:15 PM

I've learned not to rule out items.  Let the customer decide that.

 

I've taken the extreme opposite approach.  Highly critical.

 

best,

 

.....................john




#61762 Some More Noob Questions

Posted by JBaymore on 04 July 2014 - 09:07 AM

The local pottery village is some distance away, but I will go there soon.

 

That is probably the most important thing you can do.  Build relationships there.  You'll learn scads.

 

best,

 

....................john