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JBaymore

Member Since 06 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Today, 08:52 AM
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#64136 What Are You Working On?

Posted by JBaymore on 07 August 2014 - 09:44 PM

Baymore-KilnArea-8-7-2014.jpg

 

The anagama site is coming along from the last picture I posted earlier in this thread.  Today we unloaded about 1/2 of the refractories off an 18 wheeler in a torrential downpour (that started when the truck arrived... and which stopped when it left, of course).

 

Starting this Sunday morining... this project....teaching this class...... will occupy 110% of my time for 14 straight days. Then I have one day to rest... and the fall semester starts!!!

 

best,

 

................john




#63972 Why Is Our Work Better Than Imported Work?

Posted by JBaymore on 05 August 2014 - 09:06 PM

Hamada Shoji (the great "folk" potter).......... had what amounted to a ceramic engineering degree before he became a potter.

 

I have used his approach as  an inspiration for my approach.  Master the technical... so you can step back and work intuuitively.

 

best,

 

.......................john




#63879 Why Is Our Work Better Than Imported Work?

Posted by JBaymore on 04 August 2014 - 10:41 PM

PabloCasals.jpg

 

best,

 

...............john




#63876 "throwing With The Eye Of The Clay" - Do You?

Posted by JBaymore on 04 August 2014 - 09:37 PM

I spiral wedge (kikumomi).  The spiral aligns with the wheel's axis.

 

Why?

 

Think about what direction the flat clay platelets are tending to be aligned (flat sides) in the spiral wedging process...... what surface they are parallell to.  Then think about what direction the platelets are aligned when you compress ( align actually) the walls.

 

That's why.  Makes a difference.

 

If you are getting S cracking when throwing on the wheelhead .... it is other stuff causing it.

 

Off the hump S cracking is fixed by how you actually DO that process.  There are some tricks... learned them in Japan....... listed them in other threads.

 

The 'center tall and then open' is a Korean/Japanese technique that I sometimes use.  As is the 'pound open the cylinder before ever using water' one.

 

best,

 

.................john




#63744 Why Is Our Work Better Than Imported Work?

Posted by JBaymore on 03 August 2014 - 08:01 AM

"Good" as a goal seems to move further away as I go on.  

 

That pesky "good" is quite a sprinter.......... it outpaces me all the time.

 

best,

 

..........................john




#63734 Why Is Our Work Better Than Imported Work?

Posted by JBaymore on 02 August 2014 - 10:36 PM

I'm right there with Chris.

 

A thought....... it was only when I hit 60 years on the planet, and 40 years making pots professionally that I finally felt that I had a bit of a handle on this crazy medium.

 

A lot depends on where your standards are.

 

best,

 

......................john




#63652 Top 20 Potters From Ceramics History

Posted by JBaymore on 01 August 2014 - 11:35 AM

Probably the "BEST" potters......... none of us have ever heard about by name.  But their work was great, and was important in their time and some of that is likely sitting in museum cases all over the world.

 

Not a lot of time right now... and don't know how "contemporary" you really mean by "not contemporary"........but a few immediately come to mind:

 

Paulus Berenson

Lucy Rie

Hans Coper

Bernard Leach

Hamada Shoji

Peter Volkous

Rudy Autio

Paul Soldner

Robert Arneson

 

best,

 

....................john

 

PS:  I could list a lot more Japanese names......but likely not your focus.




#63563 Air Release Mold Dies

Posted by JBaymore on 30 July 2014 - 11:05 AM

You are hydraulic pressing, right? What is the press pressure you are using? That could give you a hint if the lower psi material is at all suitable. Most of industry is now dry pressing.... with very high pressures. If you are using a SM process, your press pressures are likely lower than the "industry standard" these days.

 

best,

 

..................john

 

PS:  Sheffield's "good folks".




#63430 Where Does Clay Stand In Fine Art

Posted by JBaymore on 28 July 2014 - 07:20 PM

Simple.  I don't acknowledge the distinction.  It is all art.  Some works of art are more successful than other works of art.... but it is all an art form.

 

best,

 

......................john




#63372 How Do You Deal With Injuries?

Posted by JBaymore on 27 July 2014 - 10:31 PM

Also make sure that you are throwing in a good bio-mechanical way.  Get someone who KNOWS what that means to watch you and provide feedback.  I see so many people beating up their bodies without realizing it, it is amazing.

 

best,

 

....................john




#63354 How Much Testing Or Tweaking Of Glazes Do You Do?

Posted by JBaymore on 27 July 2014 - 04:36 PM

Unfortunately this kind of understanding takes time.  Particularly since the firing schedule/profile is such a big part of the results.  Plus you have a whole heating/cooling cycle of time lag between every iteration of testing.  It is just like pretty much all other parts of the art form........ each one has a good solid learning curve.  That is why it will NEVER be boring ;) .

 

FYI......... as far as glazes go...... a 15 week, 6 hour class time per week, plus outside homework and testing time college materials course will get the typical relatively motivated student so that they understand the glaze slurry mixing aspects, the raw materials sources for oxides, the chemistry aspects, and core firing issues at a BASIC level.   As well as using Insight glaze calculation software at a basic level.  Basic body information is covered as well, but we start with a focus on glazes/glass/ceramic chemistry. This class (along with the kiln design and operation one) are both required courses.  That is what we consider the minimum to graduate with a BFA tacked on after your name. 

 

We just added a Materials II level course as an elective option for those that are interested in pursuing more.

 

best,

 

.........................john

 

PS:  Personally I am always messing around with something experimentally.  But rarely does it go into production on my own work.  Been using the same main stable of glazes for 35 years or so.  Just added a new Hare's Fur tenmoku to the line... I think.




#63331 Critique My Work - Anyone? - I Want To Send You A Bowl.

Posted by JBaymore on 26 July 2014 - 08:26 PM

Somewhere here John Baymore posted a regimen he gives his students to improve their throwing skills ... I can't find it but many have used it and liked it.

 

It is not on here as a downloadable file, but I will send a microsoft word .docx file to people who send me their email address via a PM.  It is a class handout for one of my intermediate college throwing classes.  it is important to note that it is just a PART of an overrall strategy in teaching how to throw well........ and while it is useful... it is not the ONLY things to do.  Nothing beats hands-on face-to-face instruction.

 

best,

 

......................john




#62994 Granite For Wedging Tabletop/element Wire For Fixed Cut Wire ?

Posted by JBaymore on 21 July 2014 - 11:06 PM

Guitar strings make great cutoff wires. Put a stiff spring on one end. I've got one that's going on 13 years.

 

Fender Super Slinky E.

 

best,

 

..........................john




#62934 What Makes A Good Mizusashi Good?

Posted by JBaymore on 21 July 2014 - 07:25 AM

There seems to be a lot of small details like that to take into account in proper tea ceremony ware.

 

Yeah, there are.  Spending some serious time in a Tearoom helps a potter understand what those aspects are (see my Raku Chawan comments elsewhere).  Also talking to real Chajin (Tea People).

 

Nothiong beats having a Chajin pick up one of your Chawan and say something like "Very interesting bowl."  (That is a SLAM of a critique.)  What that polite comment really means is, "Someone who understands Chanoyu (tea ceremony) would never have made a bowl like that. Can't be used for X reason(s)."

 

They say if you want to make good sake botles...... you have to drink a lot of sake. ;)   Time to study up :lol: .

 

best,

 

.....................john




#62932 What Makes A Good Mizusashi Good?

Posted by JBaymore on 21 July 2014 - 07:21 AM

Tyler,

 

RakuKen is one of the good Chadogu makers out there.

 

Hay Ken-san.... maybe we can get Cory to come over here to the forms too????? 

 

best,

 

.........................john