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JBaymore

Member Since 06 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Jul 22 2014 09:19 AM
*****

#62163 Refiring Question

Posted by JBaymore on 10 July 2014 - 09:43 AM

Plates are flat objects sitting on THICK thermal masses called kiln shelves. When the kiln is heated up, the exposed thin plate rims will heat pretty quickly and evenly. But because of the thermal mass of the plate bottom and the kiln shelf, the poor circulation with kiln atmosphere on the back side of the plate, and the fact that radiant heat transfer (particularly if this is an electric kiln) is not typically hitting even the plates top surface well......... it can cause the plates (and low wide bowls) to crack.  Rim expands... bottom does not at the same time.

 

Almost the same effect happens in reverse if ther kiln is cooled too quickly due to the cooling retarding of the thermal mass of the plate bottom on the kiln shelf.  Rim contractss... bottom does not at the same time.

 

best,

 

......................john




#62019 Slip Casting. Is It The Best Option For My Project?

Posted by JBaymore on 08 July 2014 - 12:11 PM

. Furthermore, you may want to research the demand for your product. Will these objects in clay stand up to similar products in glass?

 

Yeah... guaranteed.... offshore manufacturers will be doing knock-offs in a heartbeat if there is a market.  You'll need to get in fast, make the money... and be gone before the knockoffs that will be cheaper start to appear.

 

Posting that drawing probably was a bad idea.

 

best,

 

.........................john




#61878 Chimney Build

Posted by JBaymore on 06 July 2014 - 07:36 PM

There are things to be said for having a smaller kiln ALSO. I have a big wood kiln, a medium gas kiln, and a small electric kiln. I am thinking of adding a small gas kiln now......... maybe 6-8 cubic feet. For quick tests of ideas/glazes/bodies.

 

Will you "outgrow" the kiln .... likely. But you have to start somewhere. And starting with something you can fire often as a newer potter........ that is a GOOD thing.

 

Keep in mind.... maybe you can add a second kiln down the road.

 

best,

 

.....................john




#61779 I Know This Has Been Asked Before, But Maybe More Specific Answers? - Shows

Posted by JBaymore on 04 July 2014 - 04:15 PM

I've learned not to rule out items.  Let the customer decide that.

 

I've taken the extreme opposite approach.  Highly critical.

 

best,

 

.....................john




#61762 Some More Noob Questions

Posted by JBaymore on 04 July 2014 - 09:07 AM

The local pottery village is some distance away, but I will go there soon.

 

That is probably the most important thing you can do.  Build relationships there.  You'll learn scads.

 

best,

 

....................john




#61681 Outdoor Kilns And The Elements--Opinions?

Posted by JBaymore on 02 July 2014 - 02:13 PM

Marc,

 

They make a product called "ceramic fiber coating cement"........ it is colloidal silica with ball milled ceramic fiber added.  Seals the surface from dusting.

 

best,

 

..................john




#61667 Factors In Determining A Successful Pottery Business

Posted by JBaymore on 02 July 2014 - 11:26 AM

One factor that should be noted is that many of us did not start out with $40,000 in student loan debt.

 

The arts are not alone in this "broken system" problem.

 

I heard a recent NPR program where LAWYERS were talking about how so many of THEM cannot get jobs that pay enough to offset the huge cost of their necessary college educations either now.  Yeah,... lawyers. 

 

And I've heard friends in the medical profession also complain about this same kind of issue.

 

We need to stay a bit off of politcs in the forums (for good reasons) ... but I will say there is more to this issue than simply art schools and ceramics and such. 

 

Amen to the "practical aspects" to education Chris mentions. Much needed in many places. 

 

We also unfortunately see all to many students coming out of high schools that have been told that they are SO good and SO special and SO talented........ then arriving at the college level and "crashing" because they find out that they are just 'one of the masses' when it is no longer the 'big fish in small pond' thing.... and suddenly realize that only the best and brightest are going to make the art field work as a profession.  And by "best" I do not mean those solely with the best artwork .... but those that have the rare blend of the WHOLE package needed to be "kickin' butt and takin' names (many of those aspects being discussed here).

 

best,

 

.......................john




#61665 Hakeme Slip Recipe

Posted by JBaymore on 02 July 2014 - 11:05 AM

Babs,

 

The "recipe" for Hakeme slips I have from being in Japan and Korea (south) are basically anything from 100% of a specific kaolin-type clay....... to about 80% of a specific kaolin-type clay and 20% of a feldspathic type rock.  Not much more than that.

 

One aspect of the success of this is the really coarse nature of the clay bodys UNDER the slip.... very unlike our dense fine particled highly plastic western clay bodies.

 

But the real key is the BRUSH used.

 

Put many of those slips on with a fine nice quality bruish... and they flake right off the body as it drys.  The key is that the coarse rough brush causes impressions into the underlying clay body... that makes the two different wet to dry shrinkage materials stay together.

 

My best Hakeme brush I made while working in Japan with the bristles from an old used natural fiber broom, some string to bind them, and a piece of rope to bind over the string to make more of a gripping handle.

 

The clay underneath the slip has to be wet enough that the stiff bristles dig into it a little.  Then it has to be applied in a fast direct move.  No "redos".

 

best,

 

......................john




#61613 What Is Your Throwing Position?

Posted by JBaymore on 01 July 2014 - 01:00 PM

The speedball in tempting, but spendy, $200. 

 

Try the cost of a chiropractor or back surgery.  ;)

 

best,

 

....................john




#61315 Speed Drying In Kiln?

Posted by JBaymore on 23 June 2014 - 10:06 PM

Speaking of speeding things up........ in case people reading this thread have never seen this kind of stuff..............

 

Here is why as a handcraft ceramist you simply can't "win" the Walmart buyer price point battle:

 

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=uMD9T6O6bWk

 

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=w7Tk_7_9qck

 

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=LBJVmLTdF_k

 

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=PQ36tG1mXs8

 

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=M-QkWsrZSzc

 

Think of making the work special rather than fast. You can't compete with automation on the speed front. Do what it can't.

 

best,

 

..................john




#61299 Clay For Extrusion

Posted by JBaymore on 23 June 2014 - 03:07 PM

-they decied in past few years to generally have softer clay as stock.

 

Hum.... clay is sold by the pound, wet.  X pounds dry materials @ X $ per pound = ???  X pounds of WATER @ Y $ per pound = ??? 

 

Wonder why the change to softer clay......... hummmmmmmmmmmm..........  :rolleyes:

 

best,

 

......................john




#61289 homemade trimming tools

Posted by JBaymore on 23 June 2014 - 09:59 AM

One of the things that I share with students.................

 

If you are trying to make you work "your own"........ to have a visual and tactile identity that is personal,........... then you make things harder for yourself when you use generic clay bodies, generic glazes, and generic tools.

 

Aside from the uniqueness of your own particular set of hands touching the clay, the tools that you use to form and alter the clay DO have a huge impact on the way the clay is formed. 

 

Most tools have a distinct way they "like" to be manipulated.  As you use them, you find this aspect in them, and then tend to repeat it becasue it just seems to "work best" that way.  Many others will find the same brand / model of tool works the same way for them too.  So you all start finding "solutions" that look like each other's.

 

Make your own tools whenever you can.  Develop your own clay bodies and glazes.  At the least, realize the potential that this is happening.

 

If you don't want to make stuff......... at least try to find ones that not 'everyone' is usiing. 

 

If you are worried about the time involved.... charge more for your work.  It is likely you are underpricing your work already.

 

best,

 

....................john




#61266 What Is The Packing Material In Old Orton Cone Boxes?

Posted by JBaymore on 22 June 2014 - 11:05 AM

And the old vermiculite packing is likely contaminated with asbestos. See the history of vermiculite processing in the US for background on that.

 

best,

 

....................john




#61166 Segar Cone

Posted by JBaymore on 19 June 2014 - 11:22 AM

Do you take boxes of Orton cones for gifts when you go? Do your friends / colleagues there use cones? 

 

Yup.

 

I also ship them over sometimes.

 

best,

 

...............john




#61060 Shimpo Rk2

Posted by JBaymore on 17 June 2014 - 09:11 PM

I wouldn't trade even a Brent C for a Whisper.  Awful torque.

 

Silent.... great for classrooms...... but very low torque.

 

best,

 

.................john