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JBaymore

Member Since 06 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Today, 08:52 PM
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#109127 Artsy Babble Translation Please

Posted by JBaymore on 21 June 2016 - 10:13 AM

FYI.... my artist's statement for an upcoming solo exhibition in February and March:

 

"I have chosen the demanding approach of wood firing for finishing my work because no other firing process allows the mark of the flame to be documented in such a direct and literal way upon the wares. Ceramics is formed from very basic earth materials and is based upon the same kind of metamorphic forces that have helped to form our planet. I try to capture some of this materiality in my works, as do many artists I have met while working in Japan. Like the diverse textures and subtle colors of desert and canyon landscapes in the American Southwest which have served to inspire me, there is much to explore and find if you take the time to let your eyes wander and explore my works. Sometimes a wildflower grows in the most unexpected place. Other times one finds the clear marks of the formation processes that create the forms. Occasionally, one even finds a little tiny bit of gold. My pieces are intentionally quiet and subtle, often layering the stark contrast potential of differing types of ceramic materials. With each new firing of the wood kiln, I continue to learn."

 

best,

 

.....................john




#108996 Hiring Studio Potters Question

Posted by JBaymore on 18 June 2016 - 07:23 PM

Would it fly in today's society?

Absolutely, I would say average people still need jobs and it could work if you are willing to deal with the sheer numbers of the people it will take to find one good potter looking for a steady pay check.

 

BUT....... you are competing with this:  https://www.youtube....h?v=kUuJF9xUof4

 

best,

 

.......................john




#108918 Qotw: What Is Your Biggest Safety Fault?

Posted by JBaymore on 17 June 2016 - 09:53 AM

When loading large kilns... I do not typically wear a respirator.  I know I should. 

 

best,

 

.....................john




#108880 K26 Versus K23

Posted by JBaymore on 16 June 2016 - 09:01 PM

If you don't have a wet cooled brick saw................. one of the best saws for cutting IFB is a 24" bow pruning saw.  The snarly teeth rip right thru the bricks... and it is easy to grind new teeth into it when needed (metal grinder).

 

Takes a little practice to get straight cuts.... but works great.

 

best,

 

.......................john


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#108445 Startup Cost

Posted by JBaymore on 08 June 2016 - 07:14 PM

Also, when I did this I still had another full-time occupation, so I didn't need the pottery studio to provide a livable income. If your pottery studio is your only income, you also need to have enough capital to live off until your pottery starts to make money, which could take a few years.

 

 

That is some of the most important advice in this thread.  :)

 

 

best,

 

........................john




#108415 Looking For A Food Safe Orange

Posted by JBaymore on 08 June 2016 - 02:15 PM

Uranium oxide in a high sodium environment.  ;)   "Out of the frying pan, into the fire."

 

best,

 

................john




#108072 Qotw: Are You Already "thinking Big"?

Posted by JBaymore on 03 June 2016 - 10:30 AM

glazenerd and Marcia,

 

Some colleges still include the "skills based" part of ceramic education.  But yes, I see that shrinking also. 

 

Ours (NHIA), for one, still includes it.  Both ceramic materials (clay and glaze chemistry) and kiln design and firing are required parts of our undergrad curriculum.  3 credits in materials and 6 credits in kilns.  They have the option of also taking second level courses in both, as studio electives should they desire to go that route (some do).

 

I teach all of those tech-type courses at NHIA (along with various other studio courses and one ceramic art history course in the Art History department).  My goal in those tech courses is to get them a START on their lifelong education in the "technical side".  In the short time frame available in a 4 year undergrad program... there is only time to scratch the surface...and hopefully make it interesting.  So that they'll hopefully continue to explore it a bit.

 

best,

 

......................john




#108028 Cone 10 With Lp Gas And Soft Brick?

Posted by JBaymore on 02 June 2016 - 05:29 PM

I had a friend build a test kiln in college that fired to ^10 with a bunsen burner. It was the size of a small shoe box. It depends on size you are talking about. You should have double walls 9" thick and the higher temperature soft bricks. They come in various grades for temperature.  K-28 etc.

 

Marcia

 

 

In my kiln class, to make a point, I have sometimes demo-ed making a tiny gas kiln with a few IFBS, and a plumber's propane torch.  Works just fine.

 

best,

 

......................john




#108027 Cone 10 With Lp Gas And Soft Brick?

Posted by JBaymore on 02 June 2016 - 05:27 PM

Can be done.  The core task is keeping the combustion happening inside the small chamber....and not having a flame path that causes a good portion of the heat energy to be realized after it exits... or not at all (unburned gases).  For best luck, get (or build) a small forced air burner.

 

Most commercial larger gas kilns (like Bailey's) are no more than 4 1/2" of insulating firebrick.  They are not as efficient as better insulated kilns nor do they cool as slowly (less insulation value AND less thermal mass),,,,, but they work fine. 

 

The size of the liquid fuel storage relative to the total BTU requirement will be the next 'challenge point'.  As you draw gas it uses the heat energy stored in the fuel to cause evaporation.  As you evaporate gas, it cools the storage.  As the storage cools, less will evaporate.  So you need to be able to continue to evaporate enough BTUs throughout the whole cycle to reach temperature. 

 

Do some research.  There is a lot here in the CAD forums and in other places online that should point you in the right direction.

 

best,

 

......................john




#106962 Nhia Ceramics Bfa Course Of Study Outline

Posted by JBaymore on 16 May 2016 - 08:44 AM

Got the BFA. Got any MFA's?

 

Yes....... we have MFA, MAAE, and MAT programs also.

 

http://www.nhia.edu/...-in-visual-arts

 

best,

 

......................john




#106570 Tomobako: Construction Of Traditional Japanese Boxes For Ceramic Art?

Posted by JBaymore on 09 May 2016 - 07:20 AM

Busy right now...... end of semester at the college ................more later.

 

I import some from Japan.  I also have a local woodworker make some (American local woods).

 

In Japan they can be anywhere from very inexpensive to quite expensive... depending on the quality.

 

Here in the US... they are kinda' expensive.  Just like good pots....... good boxes require a good craftsman.

 

best,

 

....................john




#106427 Nceca Conference 2016 - Youtube Video Content

Posted by JBaymore on 06 May 2016 - 04:38 PM

NCECA has a playlist of the 2016 conference content up on Youtube:

 

https://www.youtube....x9xkOHmRXfeiymI




#106103 Help - My Kiln Shelves Melted!

Posted by JBaymore on 02 May 2016 - 10:41 AM

If it is an analog meter.... that increase in inaccuracy with increasing temperature is a well known normal aspect of the system.

 

best,

 

.................john




#105988 Large Platter Broke In Half In Bisque Firing. Anything To Do With It?

Posted by JBaymore on 30 April 2016 - 11:08 AM

Alpha/beta quartz inversion is at 1063 F.  It is sudden... at 1062 nothing...... at 1064 expansion.  Reversible on all crystalline silica (not glassy phase nor the cristobalite form).

 

Given the inaccuracy of most pyrometers folks are using... (not to mention thermal lag in the load) the safe bet is to go slowly up and down between about 1000 F and 1100 F.

 

best,

 

...............john




#105593 Simple Wadding For Supporting Pots In Electric Kiln Glaze Firing

Posted by JBaymore on 23 April 2016 - 07:41 AM

I think you are maybe mis-reading the above posting.

 

One particular wadding mix is 50% alumina hydrate and 50% EPK.  Does that help?

 

It is not 50% EPK wadding MIX that is half of the recipe.

 

best,

 

...................john