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JBaymore

Member Since 06 Apr 2010
Offline Last Active Today, 08:07 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Claywork While Going Thru Chemo

Today, 05:54 PM

They should take a list (and MSDSs) of the potential environmental contaminants in that studio (what is used there by everyone), a list of what they will have very close contact with (clay and slip and glaze), info on the kiln effluents that might get into the space (depending on quality of ventilation) and then let their physicians decide.  Make sure the physicians have a detailed and realistic understanding of what ceramists work with (most don't).

 

I teach this toxicology stuff at the college level.  An Internet forum is not the place for this kind of advice...... as well intentioned as it might be.  Same advice goes to anyone that has any kind of health concerns.

 

If you want the best advice on this subject,.... get a referral to an occupational health specialist MD, and then get them in consult with the oncologist(s).

 

best,

 

.......................john


In Topic: I'll Never Be A Real Potter.

Today, 10:19 AM

Real potters spiral wedge meatloaf. ;)   Kiku-meaty.


In Topic: Couple Of Ash Questions

09 February 2016 - 11:26 AM

Mark,

 

Thanks for the offer!!!!!  Much appreciated. 

 

Unfortunately it takes a massive amount of rice husks to make a small amount of ash.  And burning them to get the grey-black ash is a very smoky business........ the neighbors would not like that ;) .

 

The unburned hulls themselves are often used in making wadding for the wood kiln (mixed with refractory clays),... and also for simply spreading between/under pieces as sort of like the way we often sprinkle alumina hydrate powder in firings.

 

I THINK I can get them at Agway here in NH.  Haven't checked in a long time.  I'll let you know via PM if I'd like to try some of that from you. 

 

Even if I don't, THANK YOU for the very kind offer!!!!!!!!!

 

best,

 

................john


In Topic: Couple Of Ash Questions

08 February 2016 - 09:06 PM

Simply put, the "real" nuka typically only goes on my 'higher end' pieces.  $400 (+ up) Chawan and the like.  The glaze is labor intensive to make (two different ash sources... one washed), and the currently imported nuka-bai (rice husk ash) is a bit expensive.  To produce it in the volume that I'd need for all or the work that I use "nuka" glaze on......... too much work and would impact price points. 

 

Example.... If I am making stuff like say more "production oriented" dinner plates....... fake nuka is just fine 99% of the time. 

 

And by the term "fake", really it just means that it is not made in the "traditional way".  Chemically... it is very close to the same (but not exact... since ash glazes are SO complex).  Particle distribution in the batch slurry is the place that the real nuka and the fake nuka part company...... and that DOES have an impact on the way the glaze melts........ and hence some of the "look". 

 

Molecular formulas AND raw materials sourcing need to be looked at in "glaze chemistry".  Both have potential impacts. 

 

best,

 

.................john


In Topic: Couple Of Ash Questions

08 February 2016 - 07:22 PM

 

 Unpredictable, labour intensive to process/make, and dirty.

That said, for whatever reason, I really like using real ash.

 

 

Me too Tyler.

 

Tyler has the idea pretty well covered...... it is totally absurd..... and we still do it.  It also slightly fits the idea of doing wood firing....particular short duration kilns (not much ash effects).  Crazy... and we still do it.

 

I will say that my "fake" nuka recipe and my real nuka side by side... there is a discernible difference.  Only to a seriously obsessed person though. 

 

Brother Thomas did some great stuff with ash glazes.

 

best,

 

.................john