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Member Since 08 Sep 2012
Offline Last Active Today, 08:58 AM

Topics I've Started

Mounting Extruder To Block Wall

Today, 08:57 AM



I'm pretty excited, as I finally got a brand new Scott Creek, aluminum extruder for my classroom.  I had one at a previous district, but the past several years here, I've made due with the handheld variety.


Anyway, I need to get the extruder mounted to the wall.  The instructions suggest mounting it to a wall stud.  The only studded walls in my classroom are metal studs.  Those are not ideals for mounting anything.


But I do have a concrete block wall to use.  What kind of anchor is recommended, that will stand up to the repeated force of using the extruder?


Anyone have any experience with this?



Classroom Work Surfaces And Clean Up Materials

08 August 2016 - 10:04 AM

Ever since I started teaching, I have used canvases to cover my classroom tables.  I realize that many here do not like canvases because of the trapped dust, which I fully understand.  The main reason I have used them, is because they are a lightweight option, to keep chunks of clay off the tables.  A little dust may make it through, but some sponging takes care of that.


But lately, I've been thinking of trying something different.  I thought of plywood or cement board, which could be temporarily bolted to the tables, when in use.

I know Pres said he used boards that laid over his tables, in his room.  I don't have space to store any rigid covering surface, that is the same size as the tables.  My tables are 47" square.  I did think however, that I could halve or quarter that size, which would give me the space to  store them.  This would also allow some versatility, as sometimes the tables aren't full.  So one students wouldn't have to get a large board out, when they are only using a quarter of the space.



Also, I am looking for something better than my current sponges to clean the tables.  I've tried numerous sponges over the years, and they just break down too fast with our use.  I went away from them and started using synthetic chamois.  Those work great, and just do not break down at all.  However, they are not quite as absorbent as a sponge, which frustrates the students.

Do those thick grouting sponges hold up pretty well?  I've seen potters mention them before, but never tried them myself.


Thanks for any suggestions you have.

How To Build A Hand Warmer Mug

12 March 2016 - 12:02 PM

Does anyone have any experience or tips, for how to create a "hand warmer" style of mug?


For those unfamiliar with the term, here is what they look like:




I've never made one, but had a student ask me how to do so.  So, I said I'd look into it, and try to figure something out.


My first instinct, is to just throw the body, then cut out a portion of the wall, for the hand slot.  Then form a thin slab on the inside to fill in the space, score/ slip it in place, and smooth together.


Is that about the gist of it, or is there a better/ easier way?


Edit:  I noticed, that there is a part of the wall that bows out too.  So it's not so much cutting a part of the wall out, as it is making a slice, pushing part out, part in, and then using a slab to make the interior slot?

Underglazes Thinning On Their Own?

02 February 2016 - 11:04 AM

In my classroom, I've occasionally come across some of our commercial underglazes (Amaco), that seem very watery.


They seem fine, when the bottles are opened, but over time thin out.  I am not watering them down, and I've never seen a student do so either.  Most the time, if a glaze or underglaze is too thick, they bring it to my attention.  That's why I don't think they have had water added to them.


Is it possible that underglazes can thin out, due to a change in their chemistry?  They are not settling/ hard panning.  


Is there a solution/ fix to this?


On a somewhat related note, some turn darker in the bottle, regardless of color, and create a lovely smell.  The darkness burns out.  I'm guess this is due to a bacteria or mold eating some of the materials in the underglaze.